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Transamidation of gluten proteins during the bread-making process of wheat flour to produce breads with less immunoreactive gluten.
Food Funct. 2014 Aug; 5(8):1813-8.FF

Abstract

Due to an increasing incidence of celiac disease (CD) and other gluten-related disorders, different gluten-free breads have been developed using starches and additives as a substitute for gluten. Thus, patients miss not only the taste and aroma of wheat bread but also risk their sensitive intestines. Therefore, modifying gluten to avoid an immune response in CD and its application to baking is in progress. The aim of the study was to enzymatically modify gluten on wheat flour, during bread-making avoiding the use of additives, to reduce immunoreactivity, preserving its properties. Microbial transglutaminase (mTG) or chymotrypsin (ChT) was used to bind lysine or valine to gluten proteins in a model system. The best conditions were directly applied to wheat flour for bread-making with and without punching at 45 min. Subsequently, the rheological properties of the doughs, specific volume of the loaves, immunoreactive gluten content and modification of the extracted proteins were evaluated. ChT-treated breads presented a better appearance with a more homogeneous crumb, higher specific volume values (3.34-4.25 cm(3) g(-1)) and higher reactive gluten reduction (up to 71%) than the mTG-treated ones (1.23-2.66 cm(3) g(-1)) with only a 42% reactive gluten reduction. Thus, transpeptidation during bread-making is a promising technology, although it is necessary to improve the modification process to obtain the reactive gluten reduction required in breads for the treatment of CD patients and other gluten-related disorders.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centro de Investigación en Alimentación y Desarrollo, A. C. Carretera a la Victoria, km 0.6, Hermosillo 83304, Sonora, Mexico. amc@ciad.mx.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24917417

Citation

Heredia-Sandoval, Nina Gisella, et al. "Transamidation of Gluten Proteins During the Bread-making Process of Wheat Flour to Produce Breads With Less Immunoreactive Gluten." Food & Function, vol. 5, no. 8, 2014, pp. 1813-8.
Heredia-Sandoval NG, Islas-Rubio AR, Cabrera-Chávez F, et al. Transamidation of gluten proteins during the bread-making process of wheat flour to produce breads with less immunoreactive gluten. Food Funct. 2014;5(8):1813-8.
Heredia-Sandoval, N. G., Islas-Rubio, A. R., Cabrera-Chávez, F., & Calderón de la Barca, A. M. (2014). Transamidation of gluten proteins during the bread-making process of wheat flour to produce breads with less immunoreactive gluten. Food & Function, 5(8), 1813-8. https://doi.org/10.1039/c4fo00118d
Heredia-Sandoval NG, et al. Transamidation of Gluten Proteins During the Bread-making Process of Wheat Flour to Produce Breads With Less Immunoreactive Gluten. Food Funct. 2014;5(8):1813-8. PubMed PMID: 24917417.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Transamidation of gluten proteins during the bread-making process of wheat flour to produce breads with less immunoreactive gluten. AU - Heredia-Sandoval,Nina Gisella, AU - Islas-Rubio,Alma Rosa, AU - Cabrera-Chávez,Francisco, AU - Calderón de la Barca,Ana María, PY - 2014/6/12/entrez PY - 2014/6/12/pubmed PY - 2015/3/31/medline SP - 1813 EP - 8 JF - Food & function JO - Food Funct VL - 5 IS - 8 N2 - Due to an increasing incidence of celiac disease (CD) and other gluten-related disorders, different gluten-free breads have been developed using starches and additives as a substitute for gluten. Thus, patients miss not only the taste and aroma of wheat bread but also risk their sensitive intestines. Therefore, modifying gluten to avoid an immune response in CD and its application to baking is in progress. The aim of the study was to enzymatically modify gluten on wheat flour, during bread-making avoiding the use of additives, to reduce immunoreactivity, preserving its properties. Microbial transglutaminase (mTG) or chymotrypsin (ChT) was used to bind lysine or valine to gluten proteins in a model system. The best conditions were directly applied to wheat flour for bread-making with and without punching at 45 min. Subsequently, the rheological properties of the doughs, specific volume of the loaves, immunoreactive gluten content and modification of the extracted proteins were evaluated. ChT-treated breads presented a better appearance with a more homogeneous crumb, higher specific volume values (3.34-4.25 cm(3) g(-1)) and higher reactive gluten reduction (up to 71%) than the mTG-treated ones (1.23-2.66 cm(3) g(-1)) with only a 42% reactive gluten reduction. Thus, transpeptidation during bread-making is a promising technology, although it is necessary to improve the modification process to obtain the reactive gluten reduction required in breads for the treatment of CD patients and other gluten-related disorders. SN - 2042-650X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24917417/Transamidation_of_gluten_proteins_during_the_bread_making_process_of_wheat_flour_to_produce_breads_with_less_immunoreactive_gluten_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1039/c4fo00118d DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -