Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Estimating the costs of opioid abuse and dependence from an employer perspective: a retrospective analysis using administrative claims data.
Appl Health Econ Health Policy. 2014 Aug; 12(4):435-46.AH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Opioid abuse and dependence is problematic across many age groups, including the working-age population and their dependents. Little is known, however, about the economic costs of opioid abuse/dependence imposed on employers, who pay for a substantial portion of healthcare costs through their contributions to employer-sponsored health insurance and are also affected by indirect costs such as those due to disability and workplace absenteeism.

OBJECTIVE

To provide a comprehensive, current estimate of the economic burden of prescription opioid abuse/dependence to employers.

METHODS

Administrative claims from beneficiaries covered by large self-insured companies throughout the USA were used to identify patients, including employees and dependents, who were diagnosed with opioid abuse and/or dependence ('abusers') between 2006 and 2012. Healthcare and work-loss costs for abusers were assessed over a 12-month period and compared with those for patients not diagnosed with abuse ('comparison patients'), using propensity score matching.

RESULTS

7,658 matched pairs of abusers and comparison patients were analysed. Relative to comparison patients, abusers had significantly higher annual healthcare resource utilization, leading to US$10,627 in per-patient incremental annual healthcare costs. Additionally, abusers had US$1,244 in excess annual work-loss costs. Together, this implies an employer burden for diagnosed abuse of US$1.71 per member per month.

CONCLUSION

Opioid abuse/dependence impose a substantial economic burden on employers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Analysis Group, Inc., 111 Huntington Avenue, 10th Floor, Boston, MA, 02199, USA, brice@analysisgroup.com.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24919646

Citation

Rice, J Bradford, et al. "Estimating the Costs of Opioid Abuse and Dependence From an Employer Perspective: a Retrospective Analysis Using Administrative Claims Data." Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, vol. 12, no. 4, 2014, pp. 435-46.
Rice JB, Kirson NY, Shei A, et al. Estimating the costs of opioid abuse and dependence from an employer perspective: a retrospective analysis using administrative claims data. Appl Health Econ Health Policy. 2014;12(4):435-46.
Rice, J. B., Kirson, N. Y., Shei, A., Cummings, A. K., Bodnar, K., Birnbaum, H. G., & Ben-Joseph, R. (2014). Estimating the costs of opioid abuse and dependence from an employer perspective: a retrospective analysis using administrative claims data. Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, 12(4), 435-46. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40258-014-0102-0
Rice JB, et al. Estimating the Costs of Opioid Abuse and Dependence From an Employer Perspective: a Retrospective Analysis Using Administrative Claims Data. Appl Health Econ Health Policy. 2014;12(4):435-46. PubMed PMID: 24919646.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Estimating the costs of opioid abuse and dependence from an employer perspective: a retrospective analysis using administrative claims data. AU - Rice,J Bradford, AU - Kirson,Noam Y, AU - Shei,Amie, AU - Cummings,Alice Kate G, AU - Bodnar,Katharine, AU - Birnbaum,Howard G, AU - Ben-Joseph,Rami, PY - 2014/6/13/entrez PY - 2014/6/13/pubmed PY - 2015/4/14/medline SP - 435 EP - 46 JF - Applied health economics and health policy JO - Appl Health Econ Health Policy VL - 12 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Opioid abuse and dependence is problematic across many age groups, including the working-age population and their dependents. Little is known, however, about the economic costs of opioid abuse/dependence imposed on employers, who pay for a substantial portion of healthcare costs through their contributions to employer-sponsored health insurance and are also affected by indirect costs such as those due to disability and workplace absenteeism. OBJECTIVE: To provide a comprehensive, current estimate of the economic burden of prescription opioid abuse/dependence to employers. METHODS: Administrative claims from beneficiaries covered by large self-insured companies throughout the USA were used to identify patients, including employees and dependents, who were diagnosed with opioid abuse and/or dependence ('abusers') between 2006 and 2012. Healthcare and work-loss costs for abusers were assessed over a 12-month period and compared with those for patients not diagnosed with abuse ('comparison patients'), using propensity score matching. RESULTS: 7,658 matched pairs of abusers and comparison patients were analysed. Relative to comparison patients, abusers had significantly higher annual healthcare resource utilization, leading to US$10,627 in per-patient incremental annual healthcare costs. Additionally, abusers had US$1,244 in excess annual work-loss costs. Together, this implies an employer burden for diagnosed abuse of US$1.71 per member per month. CONCLUSION: Opioid abuse/dependence impose a substantial economic burden on employers. SN - 1179-1896 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24919646/Estimating_the_costs_of_opioid_abuse_and_dependence_from_an_employer_perspective:_a_retrospective_analysis_using_administrative_claims_data_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40258-014-0102-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -