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Severe physical violence and Black women's health and well-being.
Am J Public Health. 2015 Apr; 105(4):719-24.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

We evaluated the association between intimate partner violence and the mental and physical health status of US Caribbean Black and African American women.

METHODS

We used 2001 to 2003 cross-sectional data from the National Survey of American Life-the most detailed study to date of physical and mental health disorders of Americans of African descent. We assessed participants' health conditions by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (Washington, DC; American Psychological Association) Composite International Diagnostic Interview.

RESULTS

We found differences in health conditions between abused African American and Caribbean Black women. There were increased risks for lifetime dysthymia, alcohol dependence, drug abuse, and poor perceived health for African American victims of partner abuse, and binge eating disorder was associated with partner violence among Caribbean Black women.

CONCLUSIONS

Severe intimate partner violence was associated with negative mental and physical health outcomes for US Black women, with different patterns between African American and Caribbean Blacks. Understanding intimate partner violence experiences of US Black women requires recognition of key intragroup differences, including nativity and immigrant status, and their differential relationships to women's health.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Krim K. Lacey, Niki Matsuko, and James S. Jackson are with the Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Karen Powell Sears is with Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Denison University, Granville, OH.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24922123

Citation

Lacey, Krim K., et al. "Severe Physical Violence and Black Women's Health and Well-being." American Journal of Public Health, vol. 105, no. 4, 2015, pp. 719-24.
Lacey KK, Sears KP, Matusko N, et al. Severe physical violence and Black women's health and well-being. Am J Public Health. 2015;105(4):719-24.
Lacey, K. K., Sears, K. P., Matusko, N., & Jackson, J. S. (2015). Severe physical violence and Black women's health and well-being. American Journal of Public Health, 105(4), 719-24. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2014.301886
Lacey KK, et al. Severe Physical Violence and Black Women's Health and Well-being. Am J Public Health. 2015;105(4):719-24. PubMed PMID: 24922123.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Severe physical violence and Black women's health and well-being. AU - Lacey,Krim K, AU - Sears,Karen Powell, AU - Matusko,Niki, AU - Jackson,James S, Y1 - 2014/06/12/ PY - 2014/6/13/entrez PY - 2014/6/13/pubmed PY - 2015/5/20/medline SP - 719 EP - 24 JF - American journal of public health JO - Am J Public Health VL - 105 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVES: We evaluated the association between intimate partner violence and the mental and physical health status of US Caribbean Black and African American women. METHODS: We used 2001 to 2003 cross-sectional data from the National Survey of American Life-the most detailed study to date of physical and mental health disorders of Americans of African descent. We assessed participants' health conditions by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (Washington, DC; American Psychological Association) Composite International Diagnostic Interview. RESULTS: We found differences in health conditions between abused African American and Caribbean Black women. There were increased risks for lifetime dysthymia, alcohol dependence, drug abuse, and poor perceived health for African American victims of partner abuse, and binge eating disorder was associated with partner violence among Caribbean Black women. CONCLUSIONS: Severe intimate partner violence was associated with negative mental and physical health outcomes for US Black women, with different patterns between African American and Caribbean Blacks. Understanding intimate partner violence experiences of US Black women requires recognition of key intragroup differences, including nativity and immigrant status, and their differential relationships to women's health. SN - 1541-0048 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24922123/Severe_physical_violence_and_Black_women's_health_and_well_being_ L2 - https://www.ajph.org/doi/10.2105/AJPH.2014.301886?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -