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The interplay of friendship networks and social networking sites: longitudinal analysis of selection and influence effects on adolescent smoking and alcohol use.
Am J Public Health. 2014 Aug; 104(8):e51-9.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

We examined the coevolution of adolescent friendships and peer influences with respect to their risk behaviors and social networking site use.

METHODS

Investigators of the Social Network Study collected longitudinal data during fall 2010 and spring 2011 from 10th-grade students in 5 Southern California high schools (n = 1434). We used meta-analyses of stochastic actor-based models to estimate changes in friendship ties and risk behaviors and the effects of Facebook and MySpace use.

RESULTS

Significant shifts in adolescent smoking and drinking occurred despite little change in overall prevalence rates. Students with higher levels of alcohol use were more likely to send and receive friendship nominations and become friends with other drinkers. They were also more likely to increase alcohol use if their friends drank more. Adolescents selected friends with similar Facebook and MySpace use habits. Exposure to friends' risky online pictures increased smoking behaviors but had no significant effects on alcohol use.

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings support a greater focus on friendship selection mechanisms in school-based alcohol use interventions. Social media platforms may help identify at-risk adolescent groups and foster positive norms about risk behaviors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Grace C. Huang, Daniel Soto, and Thomas W. Valente are with the Institute for Prevention Research, Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles. Kayo Fujimoto is with the Division of Health Promotion and Behavioral Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Texas at Houston.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24922126

Citation

Huang, Grace C., et al. "The Interplay of Friendship Networks and Social Networking Sites: Longitudinal Analysis of Selection and Influence Effects On Adolescent Smoking and Alcohol Use." American Journal of Public Health, vol. 104, no. 8, 2014, pp. e51-9.
Huang GC, Soto D, Fujimoto K, et al. The interplay of friendship networks and social networking sites: longitudinal analysis of selection and influence effects on adolescent smoking and alcohol use. Am J Public Health. 2014;104(8):e51-9.
Huang, G. C., Soto, D., Fujimoto, K., & Valente, T. W. (2014). The interplay of friendship networks and social networking sites: longitudinal analysis of selection and influence effects on adolescent smoking and alcohol use. American Journal of Public Health, 104(8), e51-9. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2014.302038
Huang GC, et al. The Interplay of Friendship Networks and Social Networking Sites: Longitudinal Analysis of Selection and Influence Effects On Adolescent Smoking and Alcohol Use. Am J Public Health. 2014;104(8):e51-9. PubMed PMID: 24922126.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The interplay of friendship networks and social networking sites: longitudinal analysis of selection and influence effects on adolescent smoking and alcohol use. AU - Huang,Grace C, AU - Soto,Daniel, AU - Fujimoto,Kayo, AU - Valente,Thomas W, Y1 - 2014/06/12/ PY - 2014/6/13/entrez PY - 2014/6/13/pubmed PY - 2014/9/27/medline SP - e51 EP - 9 JF - American journal of public health JO - Am J Public Health VL - 104 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVES: We examined the coevolution of adolescent friendships and peer influences with respect to their risk behaviors and social networking site use. METHODS: Investigators of the Social Network Study collected longitudinal data during fall 2010 and spring 2011 from 10th-grade students in 5 Southern California high schools (n = 1434). We used meta-analyses of stochastic actor-based models to estimate changes in friendship ties and risk behaviors and the effects of Facebook and MySpace use. RESULTS: Significant shifts in adolescent smoking and drinking occurred despite little change in overall prevalence rates. Students with higher levels of alcohol use were more likely to send and receive friendship nominations and become friends with other drinkers. They were also more likely to increase alcohol use if their friends drank more. Adolescents selected friends with similar Facebook and MySpace use habits. Exposure to friends' risky online pictures increased smoking behaviors but had no significant effects on alcohol use. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings support a greater focus on friendship selection mechanisms in school-based alcohol use interventions. Social media platforms may help identify at-risk adolescent groups and foster positive norms about risk behaviors. SN - 1541-0048 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24922126/The_interplay_of_friendship_networks_and_social_networking_sites:_longitudinal_analysis_of_selection_and_influence_effects_on_adolescent_smoking_and_alcohol_use_ L2 - https://www.ajph.org/doi/10.2105/AJPH.2014.302038?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -