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Impact of endothelin blockade on acute exercise-induced changes in blood flow and endothelial function in type 2 diabetes mellitus.
Exp Physiol. 2014 Sep; 99(9):1253-64.EP

Abstract

Positive vascular effects of exercise training are mediated by acute increases in blood flow. Type 2 diabetes patients show attenuated exercise-induced increases in blood flow, possibly mediated by the endothelin pathway, preventing an optimal stimulus for vascular adaptation. We examined the impact of endothelin receptor blockade (bosentan) on exercise-induced blood flow in the brachial artery and on pre- and postexercise endothelial function in type 2 diabetes patients (n = 9, 60 ± 7 years old) and control subjects (n = 10, 60 ± 5 years old). Subjects reported twice to the laboratory to perform hand-grip exercise in the presence of endothelin receptor blockade or placebo. We examined brachial artery endothelial function (via flow-mediated dilatation) before and after exercise, as well as blood flow during exercise. Endothelin receptor blockade resulted in a larger increase in blood flow during exercise in type 2 diabetes patients (P = 0.046), but not in control subjects (P = 0.309). Exercise increased shear rate across the exercise protocol, unaffected by endothelin receptor blockade. Exercise did not alter brachial artery diameter in either group, but endothelin receptor blockade resulted in a larger brachial artery diameter in type 2 diabetes patients (P = 0.033). Exercise significantly increased brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation in both groups, unaffected by endothelin receptor blockade. Endothelin receptor blockade increased exercise-induced brachial artery blood flow in type 2 diabetes patients, but not in control subjects. Despite this effect of endothelin receptor blockade on blood flow, we found no impact on baseline or post-exercise endothelial function in type 2 diabetes patients or control subjects, possibly related to normalization of the shear stimulus during exercise. The successful increase in blood flow during exercise in type 2 diabetes patients through endothelin receptor blockade may have beneficial effects in repeated exercise training.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Physiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.Department of Physiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.Department of Physiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.Department of Physiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands Research Institute for Sports and Exercise Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK dick.thijssen@radboudumc.nl.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24928953

Citation

Schreuder, Tim H A., et al. "Impact of Endothelin Blockade On Acute Exercise-induced Changes in Blood Flow and Endothelial Function in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus." Experimental Physiology, vol. 99, no. 9, 2014, pp. 1253-64.
Schreuder TH, van Lotringen JH, Hopman MT, et al. Impact of endothelin blockade on acute exercise-induced changes in blood flow and endothelial function in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Exp Physiol. 2014;99(9):1253-64.
Schreuder, T. H., van Lotringen, J. H., Hopman, M. T., & Thijssen, D. H. (2014). Impact of endothelin blockade on acute exercise-induced changes in blood flow and endothelial function in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Experimental Physiology, 99(9), 1253-64. https://doi.org/10.1113/expphysiol.2013.077297
Schreuder TH, et al. Impact of Endothelin Blockade On Acute Exercise-induced Changes in Blood Flow and Endothelial Function in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Exp Physiol. 2014;99(9):1253-64. PubMed PMID: 24928953.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impact of endothelin blockade on acute exercise-induced changes in blood flow and endothelial function in type 2 diabetes mellitus. AU - Schreuder,Tim H A, AU - van Lotringen,Jaap H, AU - Hopman,Maria T E, AU - Thijssen,Dick H J, Y1 - 2014/05/16/ PY - 2014/6/15/entrez PY - 2014/6/15/pubmed PY - 2015/7/3/medline SP - 1253 EP - 64 JF - Experimental physiology JO - Exp. Physiol. VL - 99 IS - 9 N2 - Positive vascular effects of exercise training are mediated by acute increases in blood flow. Type 2 diabetes patients show attenuated exercise-induced increases in blood flow, possibly mediated by the endothelin pathway, preventing an optimal stimulus for vascular adaptation. We examined the impact of endothelin receptor blockade (bosentan) on exercise-induced blood flow in the brachial artery and on pre- and postexercise endothelial function in type 2 diabetes patients (n = 9, 60 ± 7 years old) and control subjects (n = 10, 60 ± 5 years old). Subjects reported twice to the laboratory to perform hand-grip exercise in the presence of endothelin receptor blockade or placebo. We examined brachial artery endothelial function (via flow-mediated dilatation) before and after exercise, as well as blood flow during exercise. Endothelin receptor blockade resulted in a larger increase in blood flow during exercise in type 2 diabetes patients (P = 0.046), but not in control subjects (P = 0.309). Exercise increased shear rate across the exercise protocol, unaffected by endothelin receptor blockade. Exercise did not alter brachial artery diameter in either group, but endothelin receptor blockade resulted in a larger brachial artery diameter in type 2 diabetes patients (P = 0.033). Exercise significantly increased brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation in both groups, unaffected by endothelin receptor blockade. Endothelin receptor blockade increased exercise-induced brachial artery blood flow in type 2 diabetes patients, but not in control subjects. Despite this effect of endothelin receptor blockade on blood flow, we found no impact on baseline or post-exercise endothelial function in type 2 diabetes patients or control subjects, possibly related to normalization of the shear stimulus during exercise. The successful increase in blood flow during exercise in type 2 diabetes patients through endothelin receptor blockade may have beneficial effects in repeated exercise training. SN - 1469-445X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24928953/Impact_of_endothelin_blockade_on_acute_exercise_induced_changes_in_blood_flow_and_endothelial_function_in_type_2_diabetes_mellitus_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1113/expphysiol.2013.077297 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -