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Association between total, processed, red and white meat consumption and all-cause, CVD and IHD mortality: a meta-analysis of cohort studies.

Abstract

An association between processed and red meat consumption and total mortality has been reported by epidemiological studies; however, there are many controversial reports regarding the association between meat consumption and CVD and IHD mortality. The present meta-analysis was carried out to summarise the evidence from prospective cohort studies on the association between consumption of meat (total, red, white and processed) and all-cause, CVD and IHD mortality. Cohort studies were identified by searching the PubMed and ISI Web of Knowledge databases. Risk estimates for the highest v. the lowest consumption category and dose-response meta-analysis were calculated using a random-effects model. Heterogeneity among the studies was also evaluated. A total of thirteen cohort studies were identified (1 674 272 individuals). Subjects in the highest category of processed meat consumption had 22 and 18 % higher risk of mortality from any cause and CVD, respectively. Red meat consumption was found to be associated with a 16 % higher risk of CVD mortality, while no association was found for total and white meat consumption. In the dose-response meta-analysis, an increase of 50 g/d in processed meat intake was found to be positively associated with all-cause and CVD mortality, while an increase of 100 g/d in red meat intake was found to be positively associated with CVD mortality. No significant associations were observed between consumption of any type of meat and IHD mortality. The results of the present meta-analysis indicate that processed meat consumption could increase the risk of mortality from any cause and CVD, while red meat consumption is positively but weakly associated with CVD mortality. These results should be interpreted with caution due to the high heterogeneity observed in most of the analyses as well as the possibility of residual confounding.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, School of Public Health, Imperial College London,St Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, Paddington,LondonW2 1PG,UK.

    ,

    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, School of Public Health, Imperial College London,St Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, Paddington,LondonW2 1PG,UK.

    ,

    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, School of Public Health, Imperial College London,St Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, Paddington,LondonW2 1PG,UK.

    ,

    Department of Neuroscience, Institute Biodonostia,San Sebastián,Spain.

    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, School of Public Health, Imperial College London,St Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, Paddington,LondonW2 1PG,UK.

    Source

    The British journal of nutrition 112:5 2014 Sep 14 pg 762-75

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Animals
    Asia
    Australia
    Cardiovascular Diseases
    Cause of Death
    Cohort Studies
    Diet
    Europe
    Female
    Food Handling
    Humans
    Male
    Meat
    Meat Products
    Middle Aged
    Myocardial Ischemia
    Prospective Studies
    United States

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Meta-Analysis

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    24932617

    Citation

    Abete, Itziar, et al. "Association Between Total, Processed, Red and White Meat Consumption and All-cause, CVD and IHD Mortality: a Meta-analysis of Cohort Studies." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 112, no. 5, 2014, pp. 762-75.
    Abete I, Romaguera D, Vieira AR, et al. Association between total, processed, red and white meat consumption and all-cause, CVD and IHD mortality: a meta-analysis of cohort studies. Br J Nutr. 2014;112(5):762-75.
    Abete, I., Romaguera, D., Vieira, A. R., Lopez de Munain, A., & Norat, T. (2014). Association between total, processed, red and white meat consumption and all-cause, CVD and IHD mortality: a meta-analysis of cohort studies. The British Journal of Nutrition, 112(5), pp. 762-75. doi:10.1017/S000711451400124X.
    Abete I, et al. Association Between Total, Processed, Red and White Meat Consumption and All-cause, CVD and IHD Mortality: a Meta-analysis of Cohort Studies. Br J Nutr. 2014 Sep 14;112(5):762-75. PubMed PMID: 24932617.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Association between total, processed, red and white meat consumption and all-cause, CVD and IHD mortality: a meta-analysis of cohort studies. AU - Abete,Itziar, AU - Romaguera,Dora, AU - Vieira,Ana Rita, AU - Lopez de Munain,Adolfo, AU - Norat,Teresa, Y1 - 2014/06/16/ PY - 2014/6/17/entrez PY - 2014/6/17/pubmed PY - 2014/11/2/medline SP - 762 EP - 75 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br. J. Nutr. VL - 112 IS - 5 N2 - An association between processed and red meat consumption and total mortality has been reported by epidemiological studies; however, there are many controversial reports regarding the association between meat consumption and CVD and IHD mortality. The present meta-analysis was carried out to summarise the evidence from prospective cohort studies on the association between consumption of meat (total, red, white and processed) and all-cause, CVD and IHD mortality. Cohort studies were identified by searching the PubMed and ISI Web of Knowledge databases. Risk estimates for the highest v. the lowest consumption category and dose-response meta-analysis were calculated using a random-effects model. Heterogeneity among the studies was also evaluated. A total of thirteen cohort studies were identified (1 674 272 individuals). Subjects in the highest category of processed meat consumption had 22 and 18 % higher risk of mortality from any cause and CVD, respectively. Red meat consumption was found to be associated with a 16 % higher risk of CVD mortality, while no association was found for total and white meat consumption. In the dose-response meta-analysis, an increase of 50 g/d in processed meat intake was found to be positively associated with all-cause and CVD mortality, while an increase of 100 g/d in red meat intake was found to be positively associated with CVD mortality. No significant associations were observed between consumption of any type of meat and IHD mortality. The results of the present meta-analysis indicate that processed meat consumption could increase the risk of mortality from any cause and CVD, while red meat consumption is positively but weakly associated with CVD mortality. These results should be interpreted with caution due to the high heterogeneity observed in most of the analyses as well as the possibility of residual confounding. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24932617/Association_between_total_processed_red_and_white_meat_consumption_and_all_cause_CVD_and_IHD_mortality:_a_meta_analysis_of_cohort_studies_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S000711451400124X/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -