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School climate and bullying victimization: a latent class growth model analysis.
Sch Psychol Q. 2014 Sep; 29(3):256-271.SP

Abstract

Researchers investigating school-level approaches for bullying prevention are beginning to discuss and target school climate as a construct that (a) may predict prevalence and (b) be an avenue for school-wide intervention efforts (i.e., increasing positive school climate). Although promising, research has not fully examined and established the social-ecological link between school climate factors and bullying/peer aggression. To address this gap, we examined the association between school climate factors and bullying victimization for 4,742 students in Grades 3-12 across 3 school years in a large, very diverse urban school district using latent class growth modeling. Across 3 different models (elementary, secondary, and transition to middle school), a 3-class model was identified, which included students at high-risk for bullying victimization. Results indicated that, for all students, respect for diversity and student differences (e.g., racial diversity) predicted within-class decreases in reports of bullying. High-risk elementary students reported that adult support in school was a significant predictor of within-class reduction of bullying, and high-risk secondary students report peer support as a significant predictor of within-class reduction of bullying.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Special Education, School Psychology, & Early Childhood Studies, College of Education, University of Florida.School of Special Education, School Psychology, & Early Childhood Studies, College of Education, University of Florida.Meriden Public Schools.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24933216

Citation

Gage, Nicholas A., et al. "School Climate and Bullying Victimization: a Latent Class Growth Model Analysis." School Psychology Quarterly : the Official Journal of the Division of School Psychology, American Psychological Association, vol. 29, no. 3, 2014, pp. 256-271.
Gage NA, Prykanowski DA, Larson A. School climate and bullying victimization: a latent class growth model analysis. Sch Psychol Q. 2014;29(3):256-271.
Gage, N. A., Prykanowski, D. A., & Larson, A. (2014). School climate and bullying victimization: a latent class growth model analysis. School Psychology Quarterly : the Official Journal of the Division of School Psychology, American Psychological Association, 29(3), 256-271. https://doi.org/10.1037/spq0000064
Gage NA, Prykanowski DA, Larson A. School Climate and Bullying Victimization: a Latent Class Growth Model Analysis. Sch Psychol Q. 2014;29(3):256-271. PubMed PMID: 24933216.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - School climate and bullying victimization: a latent class growth model analysis. AU - Gage,Nicholas A, AU - Prykanowski,Debra A, AU - Larson,Alvin, Y1 - 2014/06/16/ PY - 2014/6/17/entrez PY - 2014/6/17/pubmed PY - 2015/9/25/medline SP - 256 EP - 271 JF - School psychology quarterly : the official journal of the Division of School Psychology, American Psychological Association JO - Sch Psychol Q VL - 29 IS - 3 N2 - Researchers investigating school-level approaches for bullying prevention are beginning to discuss and target school climate as a construct that (a) may predict prevalence and (b) be an avenue for school-wide intervention efforts (i.e., increasing positive school climate). Although promising, research has not fully examined and established the social-ecological link between school climate factors and bullying/peer aggression. To address this gap, we examined the association between school climate factors and bullying victimization for 4,742 students in Grades 3-12 across 3 school years in a large, very diverse urban school district using latent class growth modeling. Across 3 different models (elementary, secondary, and transition to middle school), a 3-class model was identified, which included students at high-risk for bullying victimization. Results indicated that, for all students, respect for diversity and student differences (e.g., racial diversity) predicted within-class decreases in reports of bullying. High-risk elementary students reported that adult support in school was a significant predictor of within-class reduction of bullying, and high-risk secondary students report peer support as a significant predictor of within-class reduction of bullying. SN - 1939-1560 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24933216/School_climate_and_bullying_victimization:_a_latent_class_growth_model_analysis_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/spq/29/3/256 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -