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Childhood brain tumours: associations with parental occupational exposure to solvents.
Br J Cancer. 2014 Aug 26; 111(5):998-1003.BJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Parental occupational exposures have been associated with childhood brain tumours (CBT), but results are inconsistent. Few studies have studied CBT risk and parental solvent exposure, suggesting a possible association. We examined the association between CBT and parental occupational exposure to solvents in a case-control study.

METHODS

Parents of 306 cases and 950 controls completed detailed occupational histories. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated for both maternal and paternal exposure to benzene, other aromatics, aliphatics and chlorinated solvents in key time periods relative to the birth of their child. Adjustments were made for matching variables (child's age, sex and state of residence), best parental education and occupational exposure to diesel exhaust.

RESULTS

An increased risk of CBT was observed with maternal occupational exposures to chlorinated solvents (OR=8.59, 95% CI 0.94-78.9) any time before birth. Paternal exposure to solvents in the year before conception was associated with an increased CBT risk: OR=1.55 (95% CI 0.99-2.43). This increased risk appeared to be mainly attributable to exposure to aromatic solvents: OR=2.72 (95% CI 0.94-7.86) for benzene and OR=1.76 (95% CI 1.10-2.82) for other aromatics.

CONCLUSIONS

Our results indicate that parental occupational exposures to solvents may be related to an increased risk of CBT.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Occupational Respiratory Epidemiology, School of Population Health, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia 6009, Australia.Monash Centre for Occupational and Environmental Health, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria 3004, Australia.Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia 6008, Australia.1] Sax Institute, Haymarket, New South Wales 2000, Australia [2] Sydney School of Public Health, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia.Department of Haematology & Oncology, Women's and Children's Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia 5006, Australia.Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia 6008, Australia.School of Public Health, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia 6845, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24960405

Citation

Peters, S, et al. "Childhood Brain Tumours: Associations With Parental Occupational Exposure to Solvents." British Journal of Cancer, vol. 111, no. 5, 2014, pp. 998-1003.
Peters S, Glass DC, Greenop KR, et al. Childhood brain tumours: associations with parental occupational exposure to solvents. Br J Cancer. 2014;111(5):998-1003.
Peters, S., Glass, D. C., Greenop, K. R., Armstrong, B. K., Kirby, M., Milne, E., & Fritschi, L. (2014). Childhood brain tumours: associations with parental occupational exposure to solvents. British Journal of Cancer, 111(5), 998-1003. https://doi.org/10.1038/bjc.2014.358
Peters S, et al. Childhood Brain Tumours: Associations With Parental Occupational Exposure to Solvents. Br J Cancer. 2014 Aug 26;111(5):998-1003. PubMed PMID: 24960405.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Childhood brain tumours: associations with parental occupational exposure to solvents. AU - Peters,S, AU - Glass,D C, AU - Greenop,K R, AU - Armstrong,B K, AU - Kirby,M, AU - Milne,E, AU - Fritschi,L, Y1 - 2014/06/24/ PY - 2014/01/30/received PY - 2014/05/16/revised PY - 2014/06/03/accepted PY - 2014/6/25/entrez PY - 2014/6/25/pubmed PY - 2014/10/18/medline SP - 998 EP - 1003 JF - British journal of cancer JO - Br J Cancer VL - 111 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Parental occupational exposures have been associated with childhood brain tumours (CBT), but results are inconsistent. Few studies have studied CBT risk and parental solvent exposure, suggesting a possible association. We examined the association between CBT and parental occupational exposure to solvents in a case-control study. METHODS: Parents of 306 cases and 950 controls completed detailed occupational histories. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated for both maternal and paternal exposure to benzene, other aromatics, aliphatics and chlorinated solvents in key time periods relative to the birth of their child. Adjustments were made for matching variables (child's age, sex and state of residence), best parental education and occupational exposure to diesel exhaust. RESULTS: An increased risk of CBT was observed with maternal occupational exposures to chlorinated solvents (OR=8.59, 95% CI 0.94-78.9) any time before birth. Paternal exposure to solvents in the year before conception was associated with an increased CBT risk: OR=1.55 (95% CI 0.99-2.43). This increased risk appeared to be mainly attributable to exposure to aromatic solvents: OR=2.72 (95% CI 0.94-7.86) for benzene and OR=1.76 (95% CI 1.10-2.82) for other aromatics. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that parental occupational exposures to solvents may be related to an increased risk of CBT. SN - 1532-1827 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24960405/Childhood_brain_tumours:_associations_with_parental_occupational_exposure_to_solvents_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/bjc.2014.358 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -