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Antioxidative properties and ability of phenolic compounds of Myrtus communis leaves to counteract in vitro LDL and phospholipid aqueous dispersion oxidation.
J Food Sci. 2014 Jul; 79(7):C1260-70.JF

Abstract

Antioxidant activities of Myrtus communis leaf phenolic compounds (McPCs) were investigated on 2,2'-9-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS(+) •) and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) tests or on oxidation of biological models, human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and phospholipid aqueous dispersion (L-α-phosphatidylcholine stabilized by bile salts). Two extraction techniques, microwave-assisted (MAE) and conventional (CE), were used to isolate McPCs, producing similar results of phenolic compound content. ABTS(+) • assay showed clearly that myrtle extracts exhibited a stronger scavenging effect than butylated hydroxyanisole and α-tocopherol, with a slight advantage for myrtle CE extract. In ORAC assay, the both McPC extracts were similarly less effective than the pure compounds as caffeic acid and myricitrin (myricetin 3-O-rhamnoside) but stronger than butylated hydroxytoluene. Moreover, myrtle CE and MAE extracts, and myricitrin were able to inhibit similarly the production of conjugated dienes and to prolong the lag phase (Tlag) during Cu(2+)-induced LDL oxidation with a dose-response effect. The cryo-electron microscopy observations on studied phospholipid dispersion stabilized by bile salts (BS) revealed the presence of bilayer vesicles and micelles. In 2,2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane) hydrochloride-induced phospholipid/BS oxidation, myrtle CE and MAE extracts gave similar effects to α-tocopherol and caffeic acid but myricitrin showed a higher protective effect than myrtle extracts. We showed also that no synergic or additive effect between α-tocopherol and myrtle extracts or caffeic acid in α-tocopherol-enriched phospholipid/BS dispersion, but myricitrin showed an additive effect and thus promoted the total antioxidant activity. These data showed that myrtle extract could be used as potential natural antioxidants, food stabilizers, or natural health products.

PRACTICAL APPLICATION

We show that microwave-assisted extraction could be an alternative method for plant phenolic compound recovery allowing important gain in time extraction.We report inhibition of low-density lipoprotein oxidation in vitro initiated by Cu(2+) ions. We report that myrtle extract may be a source of natural antioxidants to counteract phospholipid peroxidation as well as α-tocopherol.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty of Nature and Life Sciences, 3BS Laboratory A. Mira Univ, Bejaia, 06000, Algeria; UMR 204 NUTRIPASS, - Univ., Inst. of Clinical Research - -641, Av. Doyen Gaston Giraud, 34093 Montpellier Cedex 5, France.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24962212

Citation

Dairi, Sofiane, et al. "Antioxidative Properties and Ability of Phenolic Compounds of Myrtus Communis Leaves to Counteract in Vitro LDL and Phospholipid Aqueous Dispersion Oxidation." Journal of Food Science, vol. 79, no. 7, 2014, pp. C1260-70.
Dairi S, Madani K, Aoun M, et al. Antioxidative properties and ability of phenolic compounds of Myrtus communis leaves to counteract in vitro LDL and phospholipid aqueous dispersion oxidation. J Food Sci. 2014;79(7):C1260-70.
Dairi, S., Madani, K., Aoun, M., Him, J. L., Bron, P., Lauret, C., Cristol, J. P., & Carbonneau, M. A. (2014). Antioxidative properties and ability of phenolic compounds of Myrtus communis leaves to counteract in vitro LDL and phospholipid aqueous dispersion oxidation. Journal of Food Science, 79(7), C1260-70. https://doi.org/10.1111/1750-3841.12517
Dairi S, et al. Antioxidative Properties and Ability of Phenolic Compounds of Myrtus Communis Leaves to Counteract in Vitro LDL and Phospholipid Aqueous Dispersion Oxidation. J Food Sci. 2014;79(7):C1260-70. PubMed PMID: 24962212.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Antioxidative properties and ability of phenolic compounds of Myrtus communis leaves to counteract in vitro LDL and phospholipid aqueous dispersion oxidation. AU - Dairi,Sofiane, AU - Madani,Khodir, AU - Aoun,Manar, AU - Him,Joséphine Lai Kee, AU - Bron,Patrick, AU - Lauret,Céline, AU - Cristol,Jean-Paul, AU - Carbonneau,Marie-Annette, Y1 - 2014/06/24/ PY - 2013/11/19/received PY - 2014/03/29/accepted PY - 2014/6/26/entrez PY - 2014/6/26/pubmed PY - 2015/5/23/medline KW - AAPH-mediated phospholipid dispersion oxidation KW - ABTS+• test KW - Myrtus communis KW - ORAC test KW - low-density lipoprotein Cu2+-mediated oxidation SP - C1260 EP - 70 JF - Journal of food science JO - J Food Sci VL - 79 IS - 7 N2 - UNLABELLED: Antioxidant activities of Myrtus communis leaf phenolic compounds (McPCs) were investigated on 2,2'-9-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS(+) •) and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) tests or on oxidation of biological models, human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and phospholipid aqueous dispersion (L-α-phosphatidylcholine stabilized by bile salts). Two extraction techniques, microwave-assisted (MAE) and conventional (CE), were used to isolate McPCs, producing similar results of phenolic compound content. ABTS(+) • assay showed clearly that myrtle extracts exhibited a stronger scavenging effect than butylated hydroxyanisole and α-tocopherol, with a slight advantage for myrtle CE extract. In ORAC assay, the both McPC extracts were similarly less effective than the pure compounds as caffeic acid and myricitrin (myricetin 3-O-rhamnoside) but stronger than butylated hydroxytoluene. Moreover, myrtle CE and MAE extracts, and myricitrin were able to inhibit similarly the production of conjugated dienes and to prolong the lag phase (Tlag) during Cu(2+)-induced LDL oxidation with a dose-response effect. The cryo-electron microscopy observations on studied phospholipid dispersion stabilized by bile salts (BS) revealed the presence of bilayer vesicles and micelles. In 2,2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane) hydrochloride-induced phospholipid/BS oxidation, myrtle CE and MAE extracts gave similar effects to α-tocopherol and caffeic acid but myricitrin showed a higher protective effect than myrtle extracts. We showed also that no synergic or additive effect between α-tocopherol and myrtle extracts or caffeic acid in α-tocopherol-enriched phospholipid/BS dispersion, but myricitrin showed an additive effect and thus promoted the total antioxidant activity. These data showed that myrtle extract could be used as potential natural antioxidants, food stabilizers, or natural health products. PRACTICAL APPLICATION: We show that microwave-assisted extraction could be an alternative method for plant phenolic compound recovery allowing important gain in time extraction.We report inhibition of low-density lipoprotein oxidation in vitro initiated by Cu(2+) ions. We report that myrtle extract may be a source of natural antioxidants to counteract phospholipid peroxidation as well as α-tocopherol. SN - 1750-3841 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24962212/Antioxidative_properties_and_ability_of_phenolic_compounds_of_Myrtus_communis_leaves_to_counteract_in_vitro_LDL_and_phospholipid_aqueous_dispersion_oxidation_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/1750-3841.12517 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -