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Cytokine profiles in polymyositis and dermatomyositis complicated by rapidly progressive or chronic interstitial lung disease.
Rheumatology (Oxford) 2014; 53(12):2196-203R

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

PM and DM are often complicated by interstitial lung disease (ILD). In this study we aimed to evaluate various serum cytokines in patients with PM/DM with ILD so as to clarify the differences in pathophysiology between anti-melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 antibody-associated ILD (anti-MDA5-ILD) and anti-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase antibody-associated ILD (anti-ARS-ILD).

METHODS

We evaluated the serum cytokine profiles of 38 patients with PM/DM and compared the cytokine profiles of the non-ILD and ILD subsets as well as the anti-MDA5-ILD and anti-ARS-ILD subsets.

RESULTS

The myositis intention-to-treat activity index score, which indicates whole disease activity, significantly correlated with serum IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and IP-10. These cytokine levels were significantly higher in the ILD subset than the non-ILD subset and were lower in the ILD subset following treatment. By multivariate analysis, TNF-α was the most significant cytokine [P = 0.0006, odds ratio (OR) 1.4, CI 1.1, 2.2] associated with PM/DM with ILD. IL-8 levels were significantly higher in anti-MDA5-ILD than in anti-ARS-ILD, although IL-6, TNF-α and IP-10 levels were high in both subsets. IL-8 was the most significant cytokine (P = 0.0006, OR 1.5, CI 1.1, 3.0) associated with anti-MDA5-ILD by multivariate analysis. Moreover, the ratio of IL-4 to IFN-γ was lower in anti-MDA5-ILD than in anti-ARS-ILD.

CONCLUSION

IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and IP-10 are associated with global disease activity in PM/DM. These cytokine levels were high, especially in the ILD subset. Serum IL-8 levels and the balance between IL-4 and IFN-γ may contribute to the differences in pathophysiology between anti-ARS-ILD and anti-MDA5-ILD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University and Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University and Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University and Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. y-kawa@ior.twmu.ac.jp.Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University and Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University and Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University and Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University and Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University and Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University and Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University and Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University and Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University and Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24970922

Citation

Gono, Takahisa, et al. "Cytokine Profiles in Polymyositis and Dermatomyositis Complicated By Rapidly Progressive or Chronic Interstitial Lung Disease." Rheumatology (Oxford, England), vol. 53, no. 12, 2014, pp. 2196-203.
Gono T, Kaneko H, Kawaguchi Y, et al. Cytokine profiles in polymyositis and dermatomyositis complicated by rapidly progressive or chronic interstitial lung disease. Rheumatology (Oxford). 2014;53(12):2196-203.
Gono, T., Kaneko, H., Kawaguchi, Y., Hanaoka, M., Kataoka, S., Kuwana, M., ... Yamanaka, H. (2014). Cytokine profiles in polymyositis and dermatomyositis complicated by rapidly progressive or chronic interstitial lung disease. Rheumatology (Oxford, England), 53(12), pp. 2196-203. doi:10.1093/rheumatology/keu258.
Gono T, et al. Cytokine Profiles in Polymyositis and Dermatomyositis Complicated By Rapidly Progressive or Chronic Interstitial Lung Disease. Rheumatology (Oxford). 2014;53(12):2196-203. PubMed PMID: 24970922.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cytokine profiles in polymyositis and dermatomyositis complicated by rapidly progressive or chronic interstitial lung disease. AU - Gono,Takahisa, AU - Kaneko,Hirotaka, AU - Kawaguchi,Yasushi, AU - Hanaoka,Masanori, AU - Kataoka,Sayuri, AU - Kuwana,Masataka, AU - Takagi,Kae, AU - Ichida,Hisae, AU - Katsumata,Yasuhiro, AU - Ota,Yuko, AU - Kawasumi,Hidenaga, AU - Yamanaka,Hisashi, Y1 - 2014/06/26/ PY - 2014/6/28/entrez PY - 2014/6/28/pubmed PY - 2015/1/30/medline KW - IL-6 KW - IL-8 KW - TNF-α KW - dermatomyositis KW - interstitial lung disease KW - polymyositis SP - 2196 EP - 203 JF - Rheumatology (Oxford, England) JO - Rheumatology (Oxford) VL - 53 IS - 12 N2 - OBJECTIVE: PM and DM are often complicated by interstitial lung disease (ILD). In this study we aimed to evaluate various serum cytokines in patients with PM/DM with ILD so as to clarify the differences in pathophysiology between anti-melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 antibody-associated ILD (anti-MDA5-ILD) and anti-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase antibody-associated ILD (anti-ARS-ILD). METHODS: We evaluated the serum cytokine profiles of 38 patients with PM/DM and compared the cytokine profiles of the non-ILD and ILD subsets as well as the anti-MDA5-ILD and anti-ARS-ILD subsets. RESULTS: The myositis intention-to-treat activity index score, which indicates whole disease activity, significantly correlated with serum IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and IP-10. These cytokine levels were significantly higher in the ILD subset than the non-ILD subset and were lower in the ILD subset following treatment. By multivariate analysis, TNF-α was the most significant cytokine [P = 0.0006, odds ratio (OR) 1.4, CI 1.1, 2.2] associated with PM/DM with ILD. IL-8 levels were significantly higher in anti-MDA5-ILD than in anti-ARS-ILD, although IL-6, TNF-α and IP-10 levels were high in both subsets. IL-8 was the most significant cytokine (P = 0.0006, OR 1.5, CI 1.1, 3.0) associated with anti-MDA5-ILD by multivariate analysis. Moreover, the ratio of IL-4 to IFN-γ was lower in anti-MDA5-ILD than in anti-ARS-ILD. CONCLUSION: IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and IP-10 are associated with global disease activity in PM/DM. These cytokine levels were high, especially in the ILD subset. Serum IL-8 levels and the balance between IL-4 and IFN-γ may contribute to the differences in pathophysiology between anti-ARS-ILD and anti-MDA5-ILD. SN - 1462-0332 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24970922/Cytokine_profiles_in_polymyositis_and_dermatomyositis_complicated_by_rapidly_progressive_or_chronic_interstitial_lung_disease_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/rheumatology/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/rheumatology/keu258 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -