Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Excess Maternal Weight Gain and Large for Gestational Age Risk among Women with Gestational Diabetes.
Am J Perinatol. 2015 Feb; 32(3):251-6.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether, among women with gestational diabetes (GDM), gestational weight gain above Institute of Medicine (IOM) guidelines increases the risk of large for gestational age (LGA) neonates.

STUDY DESIGN

We conducted a retrospective cohort study of singleton term pregnancies with GDM delivered at University of North Carolina Women's Hospital, Chapel Hill, NC from January 2002 to May 2010. We used Poisson regression modeling to estimate LGA risk (birth weight > 90th percentile for gestational age), by body mass index class and adherence to 2009 IOM weight gain guidelines. Women meeting IOM guidelines were the referent group. Final adjusted models included race/ethnicity, medical management of GDM, and gestational age at delivery.

RESULTS

Among the 466 women studied, mean ± standard deviation birth weight was 3,526 ± 544 g; 18% (82/466) delivered LGA neonates. Birth weight was greatest among women exceeding, compared with meeting or gaining less than, IOM guidelines (3,703 ± 545 vs. 3,490 ± 505 vs. 3,328 ± 503, p = 0.001). Exceeding IOM guideline was associated with LGA among obese women (adjusted risk ratio 2.62, 95% confidence interval 1.25, 5.50) but not among overweight or normal weight women.

CONCLUSION

Targeting gestational weight gain, a modifiable risk factor, independent of GDM treatment, may decrease LGA risk. Women with GDM may benefit from tailored weight gain recommendations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24971567

Citation

Berggren, Erica K., et al. "Excess Maternal Weight Gain and Large for Gestational Age Risk Among Women With Gestational Diabetes." American Journal of Perinatology, vol. 32, no. 3, 2015, pp. 251-6.
Berggren EK, Stuebe AM, Boggess KA. Excess Maternal Weight Gain and Large for Gestational Age Risk among Women with Gestational Diabetes. Am J Perinatol. 2015;32(3):251-6.
Berggren, E. K., Stuebe, A. M., & Boggess, K. A. (2015). Excess Maternal Weight Gain and Large for Gestational Age Risk among Women with Gestational Diabetes. American Journal of Perinatology, 32(3), 251-6. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0034-1383848
Berggren EK, Stuebe AM, Boggess KA. Excess Maternal Weight Gain and Large for Gestational Age Risk Among Women With Gestational Diabetes. Am J Perinatol. 2015;32(3):251-6. PubMed PMID: 24971567.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Excess Maternal Weight Gain and Large for Gestational Age Risk among Women with Gestational Diabetes. AU - Berggren,Erica K, AU - Stuebe,Alison M, AU - Boggess,Kim A, Y1 - 2014/06/27/ PY - 2014/6/28/entrez PY - 2014/6/28/pubmed PY - 2015/12/15/medline SP - 251 EP - 6 JF - American journal of perinatology JO - Am J Perinatol VL - 32 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine whether, among women with gestational diabetes (GDM), gestational weight gain above Institute of Medicine (IOM) guidelines increases the risk of large for gestational age (LGA) neonates. STUDY DESIGN: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of singleton term pregnancies with GDM delivered at University of North Carolina Women's Hospital, Chapel Hill, NC from January 2002 to May 2010. We used Poisson regression modeling to estimate LGA risk (birth weight > 90th percentile for gestational age), by body mass index class and adherence to 2009 IOM weight gain guidelines. Women meeting IOM guidelines were the referent group. Final adjusted models included race/ethnicity, medical management of GDM, and gestational age at delivery. RESULTS: Among the 466 women studied, mean ± standard deviation birth weight was 3,526 ± 544 g; 18% (82/466) delivered LGA neonates. Birth weight was greatest among women exceeding, compared with meeting or gaining less than, IOM guidelines (3,703 ± 545 vs. 3,490 ± 505 vs. 3,328 ± 503, p = 0.001). Exceeding IOM guideline was associated with LGA among obese women (adjusted risk ratio 2.62, 95% confidence interval 1.25, 5.50) but not among overweight or normal weight women. CONCLUSION: Targeting gestational weight gain, a modifiable risk factor, independent of GDM treatment, may decrease LGA risk. Women with GDM may benefit from tailored weight gain recommendations. SN - 1098-8785 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24971567/Excess_Maternal_Weight_Gain_and_Large_for_Gestational_Age_Risk_among_Women_with_Gestational_Diabetes_ L2 - http://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-0034-1383848 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -