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Yogurt and fermented-then-pasteurized milk: effects of short-term and long-term ingestion on lactose absorption and mucosal lactase activity in lactase-deficient subjects.
Am J Clin Nutr 1989; 49(5):823-7AJ

Abstract

Lactase-deficient subjects absorb lactose in yogurt more effectively than lactose in other dairy products. However, as all previous studies were performed without a double-blind design and only after a single ingestion of the test product, the mechanism of this enhanced absorption remains unclear. The aims of this double-blind study were 1) to evaluate lactose absorption after prolonged ingestion of yogurt and fermented-then-pasteurized milk (FPM) and 2) to assess the modification of the lactase activity of the duodenal mucosa. In 16 lactase-deficient subjects we confirmed that yogurt enhances lactose digestion, this beneficial effect being destroyed by pasteurization. Moreover, the long-term (8 d) ingestion of either yogurt or FPM does not modify the results of hydrogen breath tests in comparison with a 24-h ingestion. The mucosal lactase (Dahlquist method) and beta-galactosidase (ONPG method) activities were not significantly modified by yogurt or FPM ingestion. These results suggest that in lactase-deficient subjects no adaptation occurs after eating yogurt or FPM and that the increased lactose absorption in yogurt must be mainly related to an intraluminal process.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Groupe de Biochimie et de Physiologie Digestive et Nutritionnelle, Rouen, France.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Controlled Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2497632

Citation

Lerebours, E, et al. "Yogurt and Fermented-then-pasteurized Milk: Effects of Short-term and Long-term Ingestion On Lactose Absorption and Mucosal Lactase Activity in Lactase-deficient Subjects." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 49, no. 5, 1989, pp. 823-7.
Lerebours E, N'Djitoyap Ndam C, Lavoine A, et al. Yogurt and fermented-then-pasteurized milk: effects of short-term and long-term ingestion on lactose absorption and mucosal lactase activity in lactase-deficient subjects. Am J Clin Nutr. 1989;49(5):823-7.
Lerebours, E., N'Djitoyap Ndam, C., Lavoine, A., Hellot, M. F., Antoine, J. M., & Colin, R. (1989). Yogurt and fermented-then-pasteurized milk: effects of short-term and long-term ingestion on lactose absorption and mucosal lactase activity in lactase-deficient subjects. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 49(5), pp. 823-7.
Lerebours E, et al. Yogurt and Fermented-then-pasteurized Milk: Effects of Short-term and Long-term Ingestion On Lactose Absorption and Mucosal Lactase Activity in Lactase-deficient Subjects. Am J Clin Nutr. 1989;49(5):823-7. PubMed PMID: 2497632.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Yogurt and fermented-then-pasteurized milk: effects of short-term and long-term ingestion on lactose absorption and mucosal lactase activity in lactase-deficient subjects. AU - Lerebours,E, AU - N'Djitoyap Ndam,C, AU - Lavoine,A, AU - Hellot,M F, AU - Antoine,J M, AU - Colin,R, PY - 1989/5/1/pubmed PY - 1989/5/1/medline PY - 1989/5/1/entrez SP - 823 EP - 7 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 49 IS - 5 N2 - Lactase-deficient subjects absorb lactose in yogurt more effectively than lactose in other dairy products. However, as all previous studies were performed without a double-blind design and only after a single ingestion of the test product, the mechanism of this enhanced absorption remains unclear. The aims of this double-blind study were 1) to evaluate lactose absorption after prolonged ingestion of yogurt and fermented-then-pasteurized milk (FPM) and 2) to assess the modification of the lactase activity of the duodenal mucosa. In 16 lactase-deficient subjects we confirmed that yogurt enhances lactose digestion, this beneficial effect being destroyed by pasteurization. Moreover, the long-term (8 d) ingestion of either yogurt or FPM does not modify the results of hydrogen breath tests in comparison with a 24-h ingestion. The mucosal lactase (Dahlquist method) and beta-galactosidase (ONPG method) activities were not significantly modified by yogurt or FPM ingestion. These results suggest that in lactase-deficient subjects no adaptation occurs after eating yogurt or FPM and that the increased lactose absorption in yogurt must be mainly related to an intraluminal process. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2497632/Yogurt_and_fermented_then_pasteurized_milk:_effects_of_short_term_and_long_term_ingestion_on_lactose_absorption_and_mucosal_lactase_activity_in_lactase_deficient_subjects_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/49.5.823 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -