Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

T-category remains an important prognostic factor for oropharyngeal carcinoma in the era of human papillomavirus.
Clin Oncol (R Coll Radiol) 2014; 26(10):643-7CO

Abstract

AIMS

To determine prognostic factors for locoregional relapse (LRR), distant relapse and all-cause death in a contemporary cohort of locoregionally advanced oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy alone.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

OSCC patients treated with definitive radiotherapy between 2005 and 2010 were identified from a prospective head and neck database. Patient age, gender, smoking history, human papillomavirus (HPV) status, T- and N-category, lowest involved nodal level and gross tumour volume of the primary (GTV-p) and nodal (GTV-n) disease were analysed in relation to LRR, distant relapse and death by way of univariate and multivariate analysis.

RESULTS

In total, 130 patients were identified, 88 HPV positive, with a median follow-up of 42 months. On multivariate analysis HPV status was a significant predictor of LRR (hazard ratio 0.15; 95% confidence interval 0.05-0.51) and death (hazard ratio 0.29; 95% confidence interval 0.14-0.59) but not distant relapse (hazard ratio 0.53, 95% confidence interval 0.22-1.27). Increasing T-category was associated with a higher risk of LRR (hazard ratio 1.80 for T3/4 versus T1/2; 95% confidence interval 1.08-2.99), death (hazard ratio 1.37, 95% confidence interval 1.06-1.77) and distant relapse (hazard ratio 1.35; 95% confidence interval 1.00-1.83). Increasing GTV-p was associated with increased risk of distant relapse and death. N3 disease and low neck nodes were significant for LRR, distant relapse and death on univariate analysis only.

CONCLUSION

Tumour HPV status was the strongest predictor of LRR and death. T-category is more predictive of distant relapse and may provide additional prognostic value for LRR and death when accounting for HPV status.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; School of Medicine, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; School of Medicine, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. Electronic address: david_pryor@health.qld.gov.au.Nursing Practice Development Unit, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Centre for Health Practice Innovation, Griffith University, Nathan, Queensland, Australia.Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; School of Medicine, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.School of Medicine, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Head and Neck Surgical Service, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; School of Medicine, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; School of Medicine, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25001635

Citation

Mackenzie, P, et al. "T-category Remains an Important Prognostic Factor for Oropharyngeal Carcinoma in the Era of Human Papillomavirus." Clinical Oncology (Royal College of Radiologists (Great Britain)), vol. 26, no. 10, 2014, pp. 643-7.
Mackenzie P, Pryor D, Burmeister E, et al. T-category remains an important prognostic factor for oropharyngeal carcinoma in the era of human papillomavirus. Clin Oncol (R Coll Radiol). 2014;26(10):643-7.
Mackenzie, P., Pryor, D., Burmeister, E., Foote, M., Panizza, B., Burmeister, B., & Porceddu, S. (2014). T-category remains an important prognostic factor for oropharyngeal carcinoma in the era of human papillomavirus. Clinical Oncology (Royal College of Radiologists (Great Britain)), 26(10), pp. 643-7. doi:10.1016/j.clon.2014.06.007.
Mackenzie P, et al. T-category Remains an Important Prognostic Factor for Oropharyngeal Carcinoma in the Era of Human Papillomavirus. Clin Oncol (R Coll Radiol). 2014;26(10):643-7. PubMed PMID: 25001635.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - T-category remains an important prognostic factor for oropharyngeal carcinoma in the era of human papillomavirus. AU - Mackenzie,P, AU - Pryor,D, AU - Burmeister,E, AU - Foote,M, AU - Panizza,B, AU - Burmeister,B, AU - Porceddu,S, Y1 - 2014/07/04/ PY - 2013/11/07/received PY - 2014/03/31/revised PY - 2014/05/07/accepted PY - 2014/7/9/entrez PY - 2014/7/9/pubmed PY - 2015/5/29/medline KW - Human papillomavirus KW - oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma KW - p16 KW - prognosis KW - radiotherapy KW - staging SP - 643 EP - 7 JF - Clinical oncology (Royal College of Radiologists (Great Britain)) JO - Clin Oncol (R Coll Radiol) VL - 26 IS - 10 N2 - AIMS: To determine prognostic factors for locoregional relapse (LRR), distant relapse and all-cause death in a contemporary cohort of locoregionally advanced oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy alone. MATERIALS AND METHODS: OSCC patients treated with definitive radiotherapy between 2005 and 2010 were identified from a prospective head and neck database. Patient age, gender, smoking history, human papillomavirus (HPV) status, T- and N-category, lowest involved nodal level and gross tumour volume of the primary (GTV-p) and nodal (GTV-n) disease were analysed in relation to LRR, distant relapse and death by way of univariate and multivariate analysis. RESULTS: In total, 130 patients were identified, 88 HPV positive, with a median follow-up of 42 months. On multivariate analysis HPV status was a significant predictor of LRR (hazard ratio 0.15; 95% confidence interval 0.05-0.51) and death (hazard ratio 0.29; 95% confidence interval 0.14-0.59) but not distant relapse (hazard ratio 0.53, 95% confidence interval 0.22-1.27). Increasing T-category was associated with a higher risk of LRR (hazard ratio 1.80 for T3/4 versus T1/2; 95% confidence interval 1.08-2.99), death (hazard ratio 1.37, 95% confidence interval 1.06-1.77) and distant relapse (hazard ratio 1.35; 95% confidence interval 1.00-1.83). Increasing GTV-p was associated with increased risk of distant relapse and death. N3 disease and low neck nodes were significant for LRR, distant relapse and death on univariate analysis only. CONCLUSION: Tumour HPV status was the strongest predictor of LRR and death. T-category is more predictive of distant relapse and may provide additional prognostic value for LRR and death when accounting for HPV status. SN - 1433-2981 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25001635/T_category_remains_an_important_prognostic_factor_for_oropharyngeal_carcinoma_in_the_era_of_human_papillomavirus_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0936-6555(14)00261-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -