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Screening for germline mismatch repair mutations following diagnosis of sebaceous neoplasm.
JAMA Dermatol. 2014 Dec; 150(12):1315-21.JD

Abstract

IMPORTANCE Sebaceous neoplasms (SNs) define the Muir-Torre syndrome variant of Lynch syndrome (LS), which is associated with increased risk for colon and other cancers necessitating earlier and more frequent screening to reduce morbidity and mortality.Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for mismatch repair (MMR) proteins in SNs can be used to screen for LS, but data on subsequent germline genetic testing to confirm LS diagnosis are limited.OBJECTIVE To characterize the utility of IHC screening of SNs in identification of germline MMR mutations confirming LS.DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective study at 2 academic cancer centers of 86 adult patients referred for clinical genetics evaluation after diagnosis of SN.MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Results of tumor IHC testing and germline genetic testing were reviewed to determine positive predictive value and sensitivity of IHC testing in diagnosis of LS. Clinical variables, including age at diagnosis of SN, clinical diagnostic criteria for LS and Muir-Torre syndrome, and family history characteristics were compared between mutation carriers and noncarriers.RESULTS Of 86 patients with SNs, 25 (29%) had germline MMR mutations confirming LS.Among 77 patients with IHC testing on SNs, 38 (49%) had loss of staining of 1 or more MMR proteins and 14 had germline MMR mutations. Immunohistochemical analysis correctly identified 13 of 16 MMR mutation carriers, corresponding to 81% sensitivity. Ten of 12 patients(83%) with more than 1 SN had MMR mutations. Fifty-two percent of MMR mutation carriers did not meet clinical diagnostic criteria for LS, and 11 of 25 (44%) did not meet the clinical definition of Muir-Torre syndrome. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Immunohistochemical screening of SNs is effective in identifying patients with germline MMR mutations and can be used as a first-line test when LSis suspected. Abnormal IHC results, including absence of MSH2, are not diagnostic of LS and should be interpreted cautiously in conjunction with family history and germline genetic testing. Use of family history to select patients for IHC screening has substantial limitations,suggesting that universal IHC screening of SNs merits further study. Clinical genetics evaluation is warranted for patients with abnormal IHC test results, normal IHC test results with personal or family history of other LS-associated neoplasms, and/or multiple SNs.

Authors

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Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25006859

Citation

Everett, Jessica N., et al. "Screening for Germline Mismatch Repair Mutations Following Diagnosis of Sebaceous Neoplasm." JAMA Dermatology, vol. 150, no. 12, 2014, pp. 1315-21.
Everett JN, Raymond VM, Dandapani M, et al. Screening for germline mismatch repair mutations following diagnosis of sebaceous neoplasm. JAMA Dermatol. 2014;150(12):1315-21.
Everett, J. N., Raymond, V. M., Dandapani, M., Marvin, M., Kohlmann, W., Chittenden, A., Koeppe, E., Gustafson, S. L., Else, T., Fullen, D. R., Johnson, T. M., Syngal, S., Gruber, S. B., & Stoffel, E. M. (2014). Screening for germline mismatch repair mutations following diagnosis of sebaceous neoplasm. JAMA Dermatology, 150(12), 1315-21.
Everett JN, et al. Screening for Germline Mismatch Repair Mutations Following Diagnosis of Sebaceous Neoplasm. JAMA Dermatol. 2014;150(12):1315-21. PubMed PMID: 25006859.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Screening for germline mismatch repair mutations following diagnosis of sebaceous neoplasm. AU - Everett,Jessica N, AU - Raymond,Victoria M, AU - Dandapani,Monica, AU - Marvin,Monica, AU - Kohlmann,Wendy, AU - Chittenden,Anu, AU - Koeppe,Erika, AU - Gustafson,Shanna L, AU - Else,Tobias, AU - Fullen,Douglas R, AU - Johnson,Timothy M, AU - Syngal,Sapna, AU - Gruber,Stephen B, AU - Stoffel,Elena M, PY - 2014/7/10/entrez PY - 2014/7/10/pubmed PY - 2015/3/10/medline SP - 1315 EP - 21 JF - JAMA dermatology JO - JAMA Dermatol VL - 150 IS - 12 N2 - IMPORTANCE Sebaceous neoplasms (SNs) define the Muir-Torre syndrome variant of Lynch syndrome (LS), which is associated with increased risk for colon and other cancers necessitating earlier and more frequent screening to reduce morbidity and mortality.Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for mismatch repair (MMR) proteins in SNs can be used to screen for LS, but data on subsequent germline genetic testing to confirm LS diagnosis are limited.OBJECTIVE To characterize the utility of IHC screening of SNs in identification of germline MMR mutations confirming LS.DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective study at 2 academic cancer centers of 86 adult patients referred for clinical genetics evaluation after diagnosis of SN.MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Results of tumor IHC testing and germline genetic testing were reviewed to determine positive predictive value and sensitivity of IHC testing in diagnosis of LS. Clinical variables, including age at diagnosis of SN, clinical diagnostic criteria for LS and Muir-Torre syndrome, and family history characteristics were compared between mutation carriers and noncarriers.RESULTS Of 86 patients with SNs, 25 (29%) had germline MMR mutations confirming LS.Among 77 patients with IHC testing on SNs, 38 (49%) had loss of staining of 1 or more MMR proteins and 14 had germline MMR mutations. Immunohistochemical analysis correctly identified 13 of 16 MMR mutation carriers, corresponding to 81% sensitivity. Ten of 12 patients(83%) with more than 1 SN had MMR mutations. Fifty-two percent of MMR mutation carriers did not meet clinical diagnostic criteria for LS, and 11 of 25 (44%) did not meet the clinical definition of Muir-Torre syndrome. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Immunohistochemical screening of SNs is effective in identifying patients with germline MMR mutations and can be used as a first-line test when LSis suspected. Abnormal IHC results, including absence of MSH2, are not diagnostic of LS and should be interpreted cautiously in conjunction with family history and germline genetic testing. Use of family history to select patients for IHC screening has substantial limitations,suggesting that universal IHC screening of SNs merits further study. Clinical genetics evaluation is warranted for patients with abnormal IHC test results, normal IHC test results with personal or family history of other LS-associated neoplasms, and/or multiple SNs. SN - 2168-6084 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25006859/Screening_for_germline_mismatch_repair_mutations_following_diagnosis_of_sebaceous_neoplasm_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamadermatology/fullarticle/10.1001/jamadermatol.2014.1217 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -