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Serum levels of soluble receptor for advanced glycation end-products and metabolic syndrome: the Northern Manhattan Study.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Recent studies have shown a strong link between serum soluble receptor for advanced glycation end-products (sRAGE) levels and cardiovascular risk factors and disease. What is less clear is the relationship between metabolic risk factors and sRAGE levels. Here, we tested the hypothesis that lower sRAGE levels may be associated with the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in an urban multi ethnic population.

MATERIALS/METHODS

From the Northern Manhattan Study (NOMAS), we included 1101 stroke-free participants (mean age: 71 ± 9 years, 60% women, 64% Hispanic, 18% black, 16% white). Serum sRAGE was measured by ELISA. Quantile regression analysis was performed to evaluate the association between sRAGE and MetS components and MetS, after adjusting for sociodemographics, smoking status and kidney function.

RESULTS

The median (interquartile) sRAGE was 899 pg/ml (647-1248 pg/ml), 42% had metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of unfavorable metabolic factors was 50% for waist circumference (WC), 81% for blood pressure, 39% for fasting glucose, 35% for reduced high density lipoproteins (HDL), and 23% for triglycerides. After adjustment, the median sRAGE levels were at least 120 pg/ml lower in those who had elevated WC (p<0.0001), blood pressure (p=0.0014), and fasting glucose (p<0.0001), and those who had 2 or more unfavorable metabolic factors. No relationship was seen between sRAGE levels and elevated triglycerides or reduced HDL levels. Interaction and stratified analyses revealed that the association of sRAGE with MetS was more prominent in Hispanics compared to whites, and displaying no association with components of MetS in blacks.

CONCLUSIONS

sRAGE levels were mainly associated with MetS factors related to obesity, diabetes and hypertension, and displayed variation with ethnicity in a multi-ethnic population. Further studies of sRAGE, MetS and their relationship to cardiovascular disease are warranted.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism, Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA. Electronic address: bhudson@med.miami.edu.

    ,

    Department of Neurology, Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA; Evelyn F. McKnight Brain Institute, Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA.

    ,

    Department of Neurology, Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA.

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    Stroke Division, Department of Neurology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA; Department of Epidemiology, Mailman Public School of Health, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.

    ,

    Department of Neurology, Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA; Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA; Evelyn F. McKnight Brain Institute, Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA; Neuroscience Program, Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA.

    ,

    Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism, Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA.

    ,

    Department of Neurology, Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA; Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA; Evelyn F. McKnight Brain Institute, Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA.

    Department of Neurology, Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA; Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA; Evelyn F. McKnight Brain Institute, Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA.

    Source

    Metabolism: clinical and experimental 63:9 2014 Sep pg 1125-30

    MeSH

    African Americans
    Aged
    Biomarkers
    Body Mass Index
    Cohort Studies
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Down-Regulation
    European Continental Ancestry Group
    Female
    Hispanic Americans
    Humans
    Hyperglycemia
    Hypertension
    Male
    Metabolic Syndrome
    New York City
    Obesity, Abdominal
    Prevalence
    Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products
    Receptors, Immunologic
    Solubility
    Urban Health
    Waist Circumference

    Pub Type(s)

    Comparative Study
    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    25012910

    Citation

    Hudson, Barry I., et al. "Serum Levels of Soluble Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-products and Metabolic Syndrome: the Northern Manhattan Study." Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, vol. 63, no. 9, 2014, pp. 1125-30.
    Hudson BI, Dong C, Gardener H, et al. Serum levels of soluble receptor for advanced glycation end-products and metabolic syndrome: the Northern Manhattan Study. Metab Clin Exp. 2014;63(9):1125-30.
    Hudson, B. I., Dong, C., Gardener, H., Elkind, M. S., Wright, C. B., Goldberg, R., ... Rundek, T. (2014). Serum levels of soluble receptor for advanced glycation end-products and metabolic syndrome: the Northern Manhattan Study. Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, 63(9), pp. 1125-30. doi:10.1016/j.metabol.2014.05.011.
    Hudson BI, et al. Serum Levels of Soluble Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-products and Metabolic Syndrome: the Northern Manhattan Study. Metab Clin Exp. 2014;63(9):1125-30. PubMed PMID: 25012910.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Serum levels of soluble receptor for advanced glycation end-products and metabolic syndrome: the Northern Manhattan Study. AU - Hudson,Barry I, AU - Dong,Chuanhui, AU - Gardener,Hannah, AU - Elkind,Mitchell S V, AU - Wright,Clinton B, AU - Goldberg,Ron, AU - Sacco,Ralph L, AU - Rundek,Tatjana, Y1 - 2014/06/04/ PY - 2014/03/28/received PY - 2014/05/22/revised PY - 2014/05/22/accepted PY - 2014/7/12/entrez PY - 2014/7/12/pubmed PY - 2014/10/11/medline KW - Biomarker KW - Cardiovascular disease KW - Diabetes KW - Metabolic syndrome KW - RAGE SP - 1125 EP - 30 JF - Metabolism: clinical and experimental JO - Metab. Clin. Exp. VL - 63 IS - 9 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Recent studies have shown a strong link between serum soluble receptor for advanced glycation end-products (sRAGE) levels and cardiovascular risk factors and disease. What is less clear is the relationship between metabolic risk factors and sRAGE levels. Here, we tested the hypothesis that lower sRAGE levels may be associated with the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in an urban multi ethnic population. MATERIALS/METHODS: From the Northern Manhattan Study (NOMAS), we included 1101 stroke-free participants (mean age: 71 ± 9 years, 60% women, 64% Hispanic, 18% black, 16% white). Serum sRAGE was measured by ELISA. Quantile regression analysis was performed to evaluate the association between sRAGE and MetS components and MetS, after adjusting for sociodemographics, smoking status and kidney function. RESULTS: The median (interquartile) sRAGE was 899 pg/ml (647-1248 pg/ml), 42% had metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of unfavorable metabolic factors was 50% for waist circumference (WC), 81% for blood pressure, 39% for fasting glucose, 35% for reduced high density lipoproteins (HDL), and 23% for triglycerides. After adjustment, the median sRAGE levels were at least 120 pg/ml lower in those who had elevated WC (p<0.0001), blood pressure (p=0.0014), and fasting glucose (p<0.0001), and those who had 2 or more unfavorable metabolic factors. No relationship was seen between sRAGE levels and elevated triglycerides or reduced HDL levels. Interaction and stratified analyses revealed that the association of sRAGE with MetS was more prominent in Hispanics compared to whites, and displaying no association with components of MetS in blacks. CONCLUSIONS: sRAGE levels were mainly associated with MetS factors related to obesity, diabetes and hypertension, and displayed variation with ethnicity in a multi-ethnic population. Further studies of sRAGE, MetS and their relationship to cardiovascular disease are warranted. SN - 1532-8600 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25012910/Serum_levels_of_soluble_receptor_for_advanced_glycation_end_products_and_metabolic_syndrome:_the_Northern_Manhattan_Study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0026-0495(14)00160-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -