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A prospective cohort study investigating readmission, symptom attribution and psychological health within six months of primary percutaneous coronary intervention.
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs 2015; 14(6):506-15EJ

Abstract

AIMS

Following primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) for ST-elevation myocardial infarction, some patients are readmitted with potential ischaemic heart disease symptoms. This study investigated the proportion of PPCI patients readmitted due to potential ischaemic heart disease symptoms within six months, and the cause of symptoms and associated factors.

METHODS AND RESULTS

A prospective cohort study included consecutive PPCI patients. Baseline variables incorporated the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events, the Charlson Comorbidity Index and self-report measures ENRICHD Social Support Inventory, Seattle Angina Questionnaire (SAQ) and Hospital and Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). At six months, repeat SAQ, HADS and readmission data were collected. Of 202 PPCI patients (mean 59.7 years (SD 13.9), 75.7% male), 38 (18.8%; 95% confidence interval 14.0-24.8%) were readmitted due to potential ischaemic heart disease symptoms (16 cardiac events, 22 indeterminate diagnosis) at six months. Mean HADS anxiety scores were higher for the readmission compared with the non-readmission group (baseline 9.5 vs. 7.1, p=0.006; six months 9.4 vs. 6.0, p<0.001). Angina symptoms were stable and infrequent throughout for both groups. Logistic regression modelling, including predictors HADS anxiety, SAQ angina stability, SAQ angina frequency, the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events and the Charlson Comorbidity Index, determined HADS anxiety as a predictor of readmission with adjusted odds ratio of 1.12 (95% confidence interval 1.03-1.22, p=0.008).

CONCLUSION

One in six patients were readmitted due to potential ischaemic heart disease symptoms, with the largest proportion receiving an indeterminate readmission diagnosis. Elevated levels of anxiety at baseline were predictive of readmission with potential ischaemic heart disease symptoms at six months.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester Royal Infirmary, UK heather@iles-smith.co.uk.Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester Royal Infirmary, UK.Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester Royal Infirmary, UK.Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester Royal Infirmary, UK.Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester Royal Infirmary, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Evaluation Studies
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25022832

Citation

Iles-Smith, Heather, et al. "A Prospective Cohort Study Investigating Readmission, Symptom Attribution and Psychological Health Within Six Months of Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention." European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing : Journal of the Working Group On Cardiovascular Nursing of the European Society of Cardiology, vol. 14, no. 6, 2015, pp. 506-15.
Iles-Smith H, McGowan L, Campbell M, et al. A prospective cohort study investigating readmission, symptom attribution and psychological health within six months of primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2015;14(6):506-15.
Iles-Smith, H., McGowan, L., Campbell, M., Mercer, C., & Deaton, C. (2015). A prospective cohort study investigating readmission, symptom attribution and psychological health within six months of primary percutaneous coronary intervention. European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing : Journal of the Working Group On Cardiovascular Nursing of the European Society of Cardiology, 14(6), pp. 506-15. doi:10.1177/1474515114543227.
Iles-Smith H, et al. A Prospective Cohort Study Investigating Readmission, Symptom Attribution and Psychological Health Within Six Months of Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention. Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2015;14(6):506-15. PubMed PMID: 25022832.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A prospective cohort study investigating readmission, symptom attribution and psychological health within six months of primary percutaneous coronary intervention. AU - Iles-Smith,Heather, AU - McGowan,Linda, AU - Campbell,Malcolm, AU - Mercer,Cat, AU - Deaton,Christi, Y1 - 2014/07/14/ PY - 2013/08/05/received PY - 2014/06/23/accepted PY - 2014/7/16/entrez PY - 2014/7/16/pubmed PY - 2016/9/1/medline KW - Myocardial infarction KW - anxiety KW - chest pain KW - primary percutaneous coronary intervention KW - psychological health KW - readmission KW - symptom attribution SP - 506 EP - 15 JF - European journal of cardiovascular nursing : journal of the Working Group on Cardiovascular Nursing of the European Society of Cardiology JO - Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs VL - 14 IS - 6 N2 - AIMS: Following primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) for ST-elevation myocardial infarction, some patients are readmitted with potential ischaemic heart disease symptoms. This study investigated the proportion of PPCI patients readmitted due to potential ischaemic heart disease symptoms within six months, and the cause of symptoms and associated factors. METHODS AND RESULTS: A prospective cohort study included consecutive PPCI patients. Baseline variables incorporated the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events, the Charlson Comorbidity Index and self-report measures ENRICHD Social Support Inventory, Seattle Angina Questionnaire (SAQ) and Hospital and Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). At six months, repeat SAQ, HADS and readmission data were collected. Of 202 PPCI patients (mean 59.7 years (SD 13.9), 75.7% male), 38 (18.8%; 95% confidence interval 14.0-24.8%) were readmitted due to potential ischaemic heart disease symptoms (16 cardiac events, 22 indeterminate diagnosis) at six months. Mean HADS anxiety scores were higher for the readmission compared with the non-readmission group (baseline 9.5 vs. 7.1, p=0.006; six months 9.4 vs. 6.0, p<0.001). Angina symptoms were stable and infrequent throughout for both groups. Logistic regression modelling, including predictors HADS anxiety, SAQ angina stability, SAQ angina frequency, the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events and the Charlson Comorbidity Index, determined HADS anxiety as a predictor of readmission with adjusted odds ratio of 1.12 (95% confidence interval 1.03-1.22, p=0.008). CONCLUSION: One in six patients were readmitted due to potential ischaemic heart disease symptoms, with the largest proportion receiving an indeterminate readmission diagnosis. Elevated levels of anxiety at baseline were predictive of readmission with potential ischaemic heart disease symptoms at six months. SN - 1873-1953 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25022832/A_prospective_cohort_study_investigating_readmission_symptom_attribution_and_psychological_health_within_six_months_of_primary_percutaneous_coronary_intervention_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1474515114543227?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -