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Sources and correlates of sodium consumption in the first 2 years of life.
J Acad Nutr Diet 2014; 114(10):1525-1532.e2JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

High sodium intake during infancy and early childhood can change salt preference and blood pressure trajectories across life, representing a modifiable cardiovascular risk factor. Describing young children's sodium intake is important for informing effective targets for sodium reduction.

OBJECTIVE

This study aimed to describe food sources and demographic and behavioral correlates of sodium intake in 295 young Australian children using three unscheduled 24-hour recalls (when children were 9 and then 18 months of age) with mothers participating within an existing randomized controlled trial, the Melbourne Infant Feeding Activity and Nutrition Trial (InFANT) Program.

METHODS

Differences in individual-level and family-level demographic and behavioral variables were assessed across tertiles of sodium density (mg/1,000 kcal). Descriptive statistics were used to describe food-group contributions to total energy and sodium intakes at both ages.

RESULTS

Mean sodium intake was 486 mg (standard deviation=232 mg) at 9 months and had more than doubled to 1,069 mg (standard deviation=331 mg) at 18 months of age. Fifty-four percent of children at 18 months exceeded the Recommended Daily Upper Level for sodium intake, with bread, cheese, breakfast cereal, soup, and mixed dishes all important sources of sodium at both ages. Yeast extracts, processed meats, and bread products became important additional sources at 18 months. A greater proportion of children in the highest sodium-density tertile had ceased breastfeeding and had commenced solids at an earlier age.

CONCLUSIONS

The key food sources of sodium for children younger than 2 years are those that contribute to the whole population's high salt burden and highlight the essential role governments and food industry must play to reduce salt in commonly consumed foods.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25022834

Citation

Campbell, Karen J., et al. "Sources and Correlates of Sodium Consumption in the First 2 Years of Life." Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, vol. 114, no. 10, 2014, pp. 1525-1532.e2.
Campbell KJ, Hendrie G, Nowson C, et al. Sources and correlates of sodium consumption in the first 2 years of life. J Acad Nutr Diet. 2014;114(10):1525-1532.e2.
Campbell, K. J., Hendrie, G., Nowson, C., Grimes, C. A., Riley, M., Lioret, S., & McNaughton, S. A. (2014). Sources and correlates of sodium consumption in the first 2 years of life. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 114(10), pp. 1525-1532.e2. doi:10.1016/j.jand.2014.04.028.
Campbell KJ, et al. Sources and Correlates of Sodium Consumption in the First 2 Years of Life. J Acad Nutr Diet. 2014;114(10):1525-1532.e2. PubMed PMID: 25022834.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sources and correlates of sodium consumption in the first 2 years of life. AU - Campbell,Karen J, AU - Hendrie,Gilly, AU - Nowson,Caryl, AU - Grimes,Carley A, AU - Riley,Malcolm, AU - Lioret,Sandrine, AU - McNaughton,Sarah A, Y1 - 2014/07/08/ PY - 2013/07/25/received PY - 2014/04/25/accepted PY - 2014/7/16/entrez PY - 2014/7/16/pubmed PY - 2015/1/27/medline KW - Child KW - Dietary KW - Food sources KW - Infant KW - Sodium SP - 1525 EP - 1532.e2 JF - Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics JO - J Acad Nutr Diet VL - 114 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: High sodium intake during infancy and early childhood can change salt preference and blood pressure trajectories across life, representing a modifiable cardiovascular risk factor. Describing young children's sodium intake is important for informing effective targets for sodium reduction. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to describe food sources and demographic and behavioral correlates of sodium intake in 295 young Australian children using three unscheduled 24-hour recalls (when children were 9 and then 18 months of age) with mothers participating within an existing randomized controlled trial, the Melbourne Infant Feeding Activity and Nutrition Trial (InFANT) Program. METHODS: Differences in individual-level and family-level demographic and behavioral variables were assessed across tertiles of sodium density (mg/1,000 kcal). Descriptive statistics were used to describe food-group contributions to total energy and sodium intakes at both ages. RESULTS: Mean sodium intake was 486 mg (standard deviation=232 mg) at 9 months and had more than doubled to 1,069 mg (standard deviation=331 mg) at 18 months of age. Fifty-four percent of children at 18 months exceeded the Recommended Daily Upper Level for sodium intake, with bread, cheese, breakfast cereal, soup, and mixed dishes all important sources of sodium at both ages. Yeast extracts, processed meats, and bread products became important additional sources at 18 months. A greater proportion of children in the highest sodium-density tertile had ceased breastfeeding and had commenced solids at an earlier age. CONCLUSIONS: The key food sources of sodium for children younger than 2 years are those that contribute to the whole population's high salt burden and highlight the essential role governments and food industry must play to reduce salt in commonly consumed foods. SN - 2212-2672 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25022834/Sources_and_correlates_of_sodium_consumption_in_the_first_2_years_of_life_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2212-2672(14)00495-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -