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The addition of whey protein to a carbohydrate-electrolyte drink does not influence post-exercise rehydration.

Abstract

The addition of whey protein to a carbohydrate-electrolyte drink has been shown to enhance post-exercise rehydration when a volume below that recommended for full fluid balance restoration is provided. We investigated if this held true when volumes sufficient to restore fluid balance were consumed and if differences might be explained by changes in plasma albumin content. Sixteen participants lost ~1.9% of their pre-exercise body mass by cycling in the heat and rehydrated with 150% of body mass lost with either a 60 g · L(-1) carbohydrate drink (CHO) or a 60 g · L(-1) carbohydrate, 20 g · L(-1) whey protein isolate drink (CHO-P). Urine and blood samples were collected pre-exercise, post-exercise, post-rehydration and every hour for 4 h post-rehydration. There was no difference between trials for total urine production (CHO 1057 ± 319 mL; CHO-P 970 ± 334 mL; P = 0.209), drink retention (CHO 51 ± 12%; CHO-P 55 ± 15%; P = 0.195) or net fluid balance (CHO -393 ± 272 mL; CHO-P -307 ± 331 mL; P = 0.284). Plasma albumin content relative to pre-exercise was increased from 2 to 4 h during CHO-P only. These results demonstrate that the addition of whey protein isolate to a carbohydrate-electrolyte drink neither enhances nor inhibits rehydration. Therefore, where post-exercise protein ingestion might benefit recovery, this can be consumed without effecting rehydration.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    a School of Science and Technology , Nottingham Trent University , Nottingham , UK.

    Source

    Journal of sports sciences 33:1 2015 pg 77-84

    MeSH

    Adult
    Beverages
    Blood Glucose
    Dietary Carbohydrates
    Electrolytes
    Exercise
    Female
    Hot Temperature
    Humans
    Male
    Milk Proteins
    Plasma Volume
    Rehydration Solutions
    Serum Albumin
    Urine
    Water-Electrolyte Balance
    Whey Proteins
    Young Adult

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    25030530

    Citation

    Hobson, Ruth, and Lewis James. "The Addition of Whey Protein to a Carbohydrate-electrolyte Drink Does Not Influence Post-exercise Rehydration." Journal of Sports Sciences, vol. 33, no. 1, 2015, pp. 77-84.
    Hobson R, James L. The addition of whey protein to a carbohydrate-electrolyte drink does not influence post-exercise rehydration. J Sports Sci. 2015;33(1):77-84.
    Hobson, R., & James, L. (2015). The addition of whey protein to a carbohydrate-electrolyte drink does not influence post-exercise rehydration. Journal of Sports Sciences, 33(1), pp. 77-84. doi:10.1080/02640414.2014.925570.
    Hobson R, James L. The Addition of Whey Protein to a Carbohydrate-electrolyte Drink Does Not Influence Post-exercise Rehydration. J Sports Sci. 2015;33(1):77-84. PubMed PMID: 25030530.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - The addition of whey protein to a carbohydrate-electrolyte drink does not influence post-exercise rehydration. AU - Hobson,Ruth, AU - James,Lewis, Y1 - 2014/07/17/ PY - 2014/7/18/entrez PY - 2014/7/18/pubmed PY - 2015/7/21/medline KW - dehydration KW - fluid balance KW - hydration KW - hypohydration KW - macronutrients KW - plasma albumin SP - 77 EP - 84 JF - Journal of sports sciences JO - J Sports Sci VL - 33 IS - 1 N2 - The addition of whey protein to a carbohydrate-electrolyte drink has been shown to enhance post-exercise rehydration when a volume below that recommended for full fluid balance restoration is provided. We investigated if this held true when volumes sufficient to restore fluid balance were consumed and if differences might be explained by changes in plasma albumin content. Sixteen participants lost ~1.9% of their pre-exercise body mass by cycling in the heat and rehydrated with 150% of body mass lost with either a 60 g · L(-1) carbohydrate drink (CHO) or a 60 g · L(-1) carbohydrate, 20 g · L(-1) whey protein isolate drink (CHO-P). Urine and blood samples were collected pre-exercise, post-exercise, post-rehydration and every hour for 4 h post-rehydration. There was no difference between trials for total urine production (CHO 1057 ± 319 mL; CHO-P 970 ± 334 mL; P = 0.209), drink retention (CHO 51 ± 12%; CHO-P 55 ± 15%; P = 0.195) or net fluid balance (CHO -393 ± 272 mL; CHO-P -307 ± 331 mL; P = 0.284). Plasma albumin content relative to pre-exercise was increased from 2 to 4 h during CHO-P only. These results demonstrate that the addition of whey protein isolate to a carbohydrate-electrolyte drink neither enhances nor inhibits rehydration. Therefore, where post-exercise protein ingestion might benefit recovery, this can be consumed without effecting rehydration. SN - 1466-447X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25030530/The_addition_of_whey_protein_to_a_carbohydrate_electrolyte_drink_does_not_influence_post_exercise_rehydration_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02640414.2014.925570 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -