Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

A higher proportion of iron-rich leafy vegetables in a typical Burkinabe maize meal does not increase the amount of iron absorbed in young women.

Abstract

Food-to-food fortification can be a promising approach to improve the low dietary iron intake and bioavailability from monotonous diets based on a small number of staple plant foods. In Burkina Faso, the common diet consists of a thick, cereal-based paste consumed with sauces composed of mainly green leaves, such as amaranth and jute leaves. Increasing the quantity of leaves in the sauces substantially increases their iron concentration. To evaluate whether increasing the quantity of leaves in sauces would provide additional bioavailable iron, an iron absorption study in 18 young women was conducted in Zurich, Switzerland. Burkinabe composite test meals consisting of the maize paste tô accompanied by an iron-improved amaranth sauce, an iron-improved jute sauce, or a traditional amaranth sauce were provided as multiple meals twice a day for 2 consecutive days. Iron absorption was measured as erythrocyte incorporation of stable iron isotopes. Mean fractional iron absorption from maize paste consumed with an iron-improved amaranth sauce (4.9%) did not differ from the same meal consumed with an iron-improved jute sauce (4.9%; P = 0.9), resulting in a similar quantity of total iron absorbed (679 vs. 578 μg; P = 0.3). Mean fractional iron absorption from maize paste accompanied by a traditional amaranth sauce (7.4%) was significantly higher than that from the other 2 meal types (P < 0.05), but the quantity of total iron absorbed was similar (591 μg; P = 0.4 and 0.7, respectively). A food-to-food fortification approach based on an increase in leafy vegetables does not provide additional bioavailable iron, presumably due to the high phenolic compound concentration of the leaves tested. Alternative measures, such as adding iron absorption enhancers to the sauces, need to be investigated to improve iron nutrition from Burkinabe maize meals.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Laboratory of Human Nutrition, Institute of Food, Nutrition, and Health, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland ccolin@ethz.ch.

    ,

    UMR 204 Nutripass, Institut de Recherche et Développement, Montpellier, France.

    ,

    ETH-Board, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.

    ,

    UMR 204 Nutripass, Institut de Recherche et Développement, Montpellier, France.

    ,

    Département de Technologie Alimentaire, Institut de Recherche en Sciences Appliquées et Technologies, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso; and.

    ,

    Division of Human Nutrition, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands.

    ,

    Laboratory of Human Nutrition, Institute of Food, Nutrition, and Health, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.

    ,

    UMR 204 Nutripass, Institut de Recherche et Développement, Montpellier, France.

    ,

    Laboratory of Human Nutrition, Institute of Food, Nutrition, and Health, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.

    UMR 204 Nutripass, Institut de Recherche et Développement, Montpellier, France.

    Source

    The Journal of nutrition 144:9 2014 Sep pg 1394-400

    MeSH

    Adult
    Amaranthus
    Biological Availability
    Burkina Faso
    Corchorus
    Diet
    Erythrocytes
    Female
    Food, Fortified
    Humans
    Intestinal Absorption
    Iron
    Iron Isotopes
    Iron, Dietary
    Meals
    Plant Leaves
    Vegetables
    Young Adult
    Zea mays

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Randomized Controlled Trial
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    25031328

    Citation

    Cercamondi, Colin I., et al. "A Higher Proportion of Iron-rich Leafy Vegetables in a Typical Burkinabe Maize Meal Does Not Increase the Amount of Iron Absorbed in Young Women." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 144, no. 9, 2014, pp. 1394-400.
    Cercamondi CI, Icard-Vernière C, Egli IM, et al. A higher proportion of iron-rich leafy vegetables in a typical Burkinabe maize meal does not increase the amount of iron absorbed in young women. J Nutr. 2014;144(9):1394-400.
    Cercamondi, C. I., Icard-Vernière, C., Egli, I. M., Vernay, M., Hama, F., Brouwer, I. D., ... Mouquet-Rivier, C. (2014). A higher proportion of iron-rich leafy vegetables in a typical Burkinabe maize meal does not increase the amount of iron absorbed in young women. The Journal of Nutrition, 144(9), pp. 1394-400. doi:10.3945/jn.114.194670.
    Cercamondi CI, et al. A Higher Proportion of Iron-rich Leafy Vegetables in a Typical Burkinabe Maize Meal Does Not Increase the Amount of Iron Absorbed in Young Women. J Nutr. 2014;144(9):1394-400. PubMed PMID: 25031328.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - A higher proportion of iron-rich leafy vegetables in a typical Burkinabe maize meal does not increase the amount of iron absorbed in young women. AU - Cercamondi,Colin I, AU - Icard-Vernière,Christèle, AU - Egli,Ines M, AU - Vernay,Marlène, AU - Hama,Fatoumata, AU - Brouwer,Inge D, AU - Zeder,Christophe, AU - Berger,Jacques, AU - Hurrell,Richard F, AU - Mouquet-Rivier,Claire, Y1 - 2014/07/16/ PY - 2014/7/18/entrez PY - 2014/7/18/pubmed PY - 2014/12/17/medline SP - 1394 EP - 400 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 144 IS - 9 N2 - Food-to-food fortification can be a promising approach to improve the low dietary iron intake and bioavailability from monotonous diets based on a small number of staple plant foods. In Burkina Faso, the common diet consists of a thick, cereal-based paste consumed with sauces composed of mainly green leaves, such as amaranth and jute leaves. Increasing the quantity of leaves in the sauces substantially increases their iron concentration. To evaluate whether increasing the quantity of leaves in sauces would provide additional bioavailable iron, an iron absorption study in 18 young women was conducted in Zurich, Switzerland. Burkinabe composite test meals consisting of the maize paste tô accompanied by an iron-improved amaranth sauce, an iron-improved jute sauce, or a traditional amaranth sauce were provided as multiple meals twice a day for 2 consecutive days. Iron absorption was measured as erythrocyte incorporation of stable iron isotopes. Mean fractional iron absorption from maize paste consumed with an iron-improved amaranth sauce (4.9%) did not differ from the same meal consumed with an iron-improved jute sauce (4.9%; P = 0.9), resulting in a similar quantity of total iron absorbed (679 vs. 578 μg; P = 0.3). Mean fractional iron absorption from maize paste accompanied by a traditional amaranth sauce (7.4%) was significantly higher than that from the other 2 meal types (P < 0.05), but the quantity of total iron absorbed was similar (591 μg; P = 0.4 and 0.7, respectively). A food-to-food fortification approach based on an increase in leafy vegetables does not provide additional bioavailable iron, presumably due to the high phenolic compound concentration of the leaves tested. Alternative measures, such as adding iron absorption enhancers to the sauces, need to be investigated to improve iron nutrition from Burkinabe maize meals. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25031328/A_higher_proportion_of_iron_rich_leafy_vegetables_in_a_typical_Burkinabe_maize_meal_does_not_increase_the_amount_of_iron_absorbed_in_young_women_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/jn.114.194670 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -