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Predicting depressive symptoms from acculturative family distancing: A study of Taiwanese parachute kids in adulthood.
Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2014 Jul; 20(3):458-62.CD

Abstract

We applied Hwang's (2006a) acculturative family distancing (AFD) theory to Taiwanese "parachute kids," who had immigrated to the United States or Canada as unaccompanied minors and remained in North American as adults. It was hypothesized that each dimension of AFD-communication breakdown and cultural value incongruence-would uniquely predict conflict with participants' family members in Taiwan, which would, in turn, predict their depressive symptoms. In a sample of 68 former parachute kids aged 18 to 36 years, the relation between communication breakdown and depressive symptoms was fully mediated by family conflict. On the other hand, the mediation effect was not found for cultural value incongruence. Moreover, a suppression effect occurred, suggesting the likelihood that an additional, unknown variable accounts for the relation between cultural value incongruence and depressive symptoms. We concluded, from these results, that the 2 AFD dimensions operate differently in this population than in previous AFD research. This conclusion was further supported by the finding that participants reported significantly more communication breakdown than cultural value incongruence with family members residing in Taiwan.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology, University at Albany, State University at New York.Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology, University at Albany, State University at New York.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25045956

Citation

Lee, Hsin-Hua, and Myrna L. Friedlander. "Predicting Depressive Symptoms From Acculturative Family Distancing: a Study of Taiwanese Parachute Kids in Adulthood." Cultural Diversity & Ethnic Minority Psychology, vol. 20, no. 3, 2014, pp. 458-62.
Lee HH, Friedlander ML. Predicting depressive symptoms from acculturative family distancing: A study of Taiwanese parachute kids in adulthood. Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2014;20(3):458-62.
Lee, H. H., & Friedlander, M. L. (2014). Predicting depressive symptoms from acculturative family distancing: A study of Taiwanese parachute kids in adulthood. Cultural Diversity & Ethnic Minority Psychology, 20(3), 458-62. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0036524
Lee HH, Friedlander ML. Predicting Depressive Symptoms From Acculturative Family Distancing: a Study of Taiwanese Parachute Kids in Adulthood. Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2014;20(3):458-62. PubMed PMID: 25045956.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Predicting depressive symptoms from acculturative family distancing: A study of Taiwanese parachute kids in adulthood. AU - Lee,Hsin-Hua, AU - Friedlander,Myrna L, PY - 2014/7/22/entrez PY - 2014/7/22/pubmed PY - 2015/10/9/medline SP - 458 EP - 62 JF - Cultural diversity & ethnic minority psychology JO - Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol VL - 20 IS - 3 N2 - We applied Hwang's (2006a) acculturative family distancing (AFD) theory to Taiwanese "parachute kids," who had immigrated to the United States or Canada as unaccompanied minors and remained in North American as adults. It was hypothesized that each dimension of AFD-communication breakdown and cultural value incongruence-would uniquely predict conflict with participants' family members in Taiwan, which would, in turn, predict their depressive symptoms. In a sample of 68 former parachute kids aged 18 to 36 years, the relation between communication breakdown and depressive symptoms was fully mediated by family conflict. On the other hand, the mediation effect was not found for cultural value incongruence. Moreover, a suppression effect occurred, suggesting the likelihood that an additional, unknown variable accounts for the relation between cultural value incongruence and depressive symptoms. We concluded, from these results, that the 2 AFD dimensions operate differently in this population than in previous AFD research. This conclusion was further supported by the finding that participants reported significantly more communication breakdown than cultural value incongruence with family members residing in Taiwan. SN - 1099-9809 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25045956/Predicting_depressive_symptoms_from_acculturative_family_distancing:_A_study_of_Taiwanese_parachute_kids_in_adulthood_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/cdp/20/3/458 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -