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Higher intake of carotenoid is associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer in Chinese adults: a case-control study.
Eur J Nutr 2015; 54(4):619-28EJ

Abstract

PURPOSE

The associations between specific carotenoid intake and colorectal cancer risk remain inconsistent. The aim of this study was to examine the association between specific dietary carotenoid intake with colorectal cancer risk in Chinese adults.

METHOD

From July 2010 to October 2013, 845 eligible colorectal cancer cases and 845 frequency-matched controls (age and sex) completed in-person interviews. A validated food frequency questionnaire was used to estimate dietary intake. Multivariate logistical regression models were used to calculate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) of colorectal cancer risk after adjusting for various confounders.

RESULTS

A strong inverse association was found between β-cryptoxanthin intake and colorectal cancer risk. Compared with the lowest quartile, the highest quartile intake showed a risk reduction of 77% (OR 0.23, 95% CI 0.17-0.33, P trend < 0.01) after adjustment for various confounding variables. The inverse associations were also observed for α-carotene (OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.37-0.68, P trend < 0.01), β-carotene (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.49-0.91, P trend < 0.01), and lycopene (OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.37-0.70, P trend < 0.01). There was no statistically significant association between lutein/zeaxanthin intake and colorectal cancer risk. These findings were consistent across cancer site, sources of controls, and smoking status. The inverse associations between dietary α-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, and lycopene intake and colorectal cancer risk were found in both males and females, while inverse associations between β-carotene intake and colorectal cancer risk were only observed in males.

CONCLUSIONS

Consumption of α-carotene, β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, and lycopene was inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk. No significant association was found between lutein/zeaxanthin intake and colorectal cancer risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510080, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25049110

Citation

Lu, Min-Shan, et al. "Higher Intake of Carotenoid Is Associated With a Lower Risk of Colorectal Cancer in Chinese Adults: a Case-control Study." European Journal of Nutrition, vol. 54, no. 4, 2015, pp. 619-28.
Lu MS, Fang YJ, Chen YM, et al. Higher intake of carotenoid is associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer in Chinese adults: a case-control study. Eur J Nutr. 2015;54(4):619-28.
Lu, M. S., Fang, Y. J., Chen, Y. M., Luo, W. P., Pan, Z. Z., Zhong, X., & Zhang, C. X. (2015). Higher intake of carotenoid is associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer in Chinese adults: a case-control study. European Journal of Nutrition, 54(4), pp. 619-28. doi:10.1007/s00394-014-0743-7.
Lu MS, et al. Higher Intake of Carotenoid Is Associated With a Lower Risk of Colorectal Cancer in Chinese Adults: a Case-control Study. Eur J Nutr. 2015;54(4):619-28. PubMed PMID: 25049110.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Higher intake of carotenoid is associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer in Chinese adults: a case-control study. AU - Lu,Min-Shan, AU - Fang,Yu-Jing, AU - Chen,Yu-Ming, AU - Luo,Wei-Ping, AU - Pan,Zhi-Zhong, AU - Zhong,Xiao, AU - Zhang,Cai-Xia, Y1 - 2014/07/22/ PY - 2014/03/24/received PY - 2014/07/10/accepted PY - 2014/7/23/entrez PY - 2014/7/23/pubmed PY - 2016/2/26/medline SP - 619 EP - 28 JF - European journal of nutrition JO - Eur J Nutr VL - 54 IS - 4 N2 - PURPOSE: The associations between specific carotenoid intake and colorectal cancer risk remain inconsistent. The aim of this study was to examine the association between specific dietary carotenoid intake with colorectal cancer risk in Chinese adults. METHOD: From July 2010 to October 2013, 845 eligible colorectal cancer cases and 845 frequency-matched controls (age and sex) completed in-person interviews. A validated food frequency questionnaire was used to estimate dietary intake. Multivariate logistical regression models were used to calculate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) of colorectal cancer risk after adjusting for various confounders. RESULTS: A strong inverse association was found between β-cryptoxanthin intake and colorectal cancer risk. Compared with the lowest quartile, the highest quartile intake showed a risk reduction of 77% (OR 0.23, 95% CI 0.17-0.33, P trend < 0.01) after adjustment for various confounding variables. The inverse associations were also observed for α-carotene (OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.37-0.68, P trend < 0.01), β-carotene (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.49-0.91, P trend < 0.01), and lycopene (OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.37-0.70, P trend < 0.01). There was no statistically significant association between lutein/zeaxanthin intake and colorectal cancer risk. These findings were consistent across cancer site, sources of controls, and smoking status. The inverse associations between dietary α-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, and lycopene intake and colorectal cancer risk were found in both males and females, while inverse associations between β-carotene intake and colorectal cancer risk were only observed in males. CONCLUSIONS: Consumption of α-carotene, β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, and lycopene was inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk. No significant association was found between lutein/zeaxanthin intake and colorectal cancer risk. SN - 1436-6215 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25049110/Higher_intake_of_carotenoid_is_associated_with_a_lower_risk_of_colorectal_cancer_in_Chinese_adults:_a_case_control_study_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00394-014-0743-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -