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Central amygdala nicotinic and 5-HT1A receptors mediate the reversal effect of nicotine and MDMA on morphine-induced amnesia.
Neuroscience. 2014 Sep 26; 277:392-402.N

Abstract

The present study was designed to investigate possible involvement of the central amygdala (CeA) nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) and 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A (5-HT1A) receptors in the reversal effect of nicotine and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA or ecstasy) on morphine-induced amnesia. Two guide cannulas were stereotaxically implanted in the CeA regions and a step-through passive avoidance task was used for the assessment of memory retrieval in adult male Wistar rats. Our results indicated that post-training s.c. administration of morphine (3-7-mg/kg) impaired memory retrieval. Pre-test administration of nicotine (0.3- and 0.5-mg/kg, s.c.) reversed morphine-induced amnesia. In addition, pre-test intra-CeA injection of MDMA (1-2-μg/rat) with an ineffective dose of nicotine (0.1-mg/kg, s.c.) improved memory retrieval, suggesting the interactive effect of the drugs on memory formation. It should be noted that that pre-test intra-CeA injection of 2-μg/rat of MDMA by itself produced amnesia. Interestingly, pre-test intra-CeA injection of mecamylamine, a nACh receptor antagonist (1-2-μg/rat) or (S)-WAY 100135 (0.25-1-μg/rat), a selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist inhibited the improvement of morphine-induced amnesia which was produced by pre-test co-injection of nicotine and MDMA. Pre-test intra-CeA injection of the same doses of MDMA, mecamylamine or (S)-WAY 100135 by itself had no effect on morphine-induced amnesia. Moreover, pre-test injection of the same doses of mecamylamine or (S)-WAY 100135 into the CeA alone could not change memory retrieval. Taken together, it can be concluded that there is a functional interaction between morphine, nicotine and MDMA via the CeA nicotinic and serotonergic receptor mechanisms in passive avoidance memory retrieval. Moreover, cross state-dependent memory retrieval may have been induced between the drugs and this probably depends on the rewarding effects of the drugs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Animal Biology, School of Biology and Center of Excellence in Phylogeny of Living Organisms, College of Science, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran.Department of Animal Biology, School of Biology and Center of Excellence in Phylogeny of Living Organisms, College of Science, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address: rezayof@khayam.ut.ac.ir.Department of Neuroscience, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine and Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; School of Cognitive Sciences, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), Tehran, Iran.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25050820

Citation

Tirgar, F, et al. "Central Amygdala Nicotinic and 5-HT1A Receptors Mediate the Reversal Effect of Nicotine and MDMA On Morphine-induced Amnesia." Neuroscience, vol. 277, 2014, pp. 392-402.
Tirgar F, Rezayof A, Zarrindast MR. Central amygdala nicotinic and 5-HT1A receptors mediate the reversal effect of nicotine and MDMA on morphine-induced amnesia. Neuroscience. 2014;277:392-402.
Tirgar, F., Rezayof, A., & Zarrindast, M. R. (2014). Central amygdala nicotinic and 5-HT1A receptors mediate the reversal effect of nicotine and MDMA on morphine-induced amnesia. Neuroscience, 277, 392-402. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroscience.2014.07.014
Tirgar F, Rezayof A, Zarrindast MR. Central Amygdala Nicotinic and 5-HT1A Receptors Mediate the Reversal Effect of Nicotine and MDMA On Morphine-induced Amnesia. Neuroscience. 2014 Sep 26;277:392-402. PubMed PMID: 25050820.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Central amygdala nicotinic and 5-HT1A receptors mediate the reversal effect of nicotine and MDMA on morphine-induced amnesia. AU - Tirgar,F, AU - Rezayof,A, AU - Zarrindast,M-R, Y1 - 2014/07/19/ PY - 2014/04/07/received PY - 2014/06/22/revised PY - 2014/07/11/accepted PY - 2014/7/23/entrez PY - 2014/7/23/pubmed PY - 2015/6/9/medline KW - cholinergic and serotonergic systems KW - drugs of abuse KW - memory retrieval KW - rat(s) SP - 392 EP - 402 JF - Neuroscience JO - Neuroscience VL - 277 N2 - The present study was designed to investigate possible involvement of the central amygdala (CeA) nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) and 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A (5-HT1A) receptors in the reversal effect of nicotine and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA or ecstasy) on morphine-induced amnesia. Two guide cannulas were stereotaxically implanted in the CeA regions and a step-through passive avoidance task was used for the assessment of memory retrieval in adult male Wistar rats. Our results indicated that post-training s.c. administration of morphine (3-7-mg/kg) impaired memory retrieval. Pre-test administration of nicotine (0.3- and 0.5-mg/kg, s.c.) reversed morphine-induced amnesia. In addition, pre-test intra-CeA injection of MDMA (1-2-μg/rat) with an ineffective dose of nicotine (0.1-mg/kg, s.c.) improved memory retrieval, suggesting the interactive effect of the drugs on memory formation. It should be noted that that pre-test intra-CeA injection of 2-μg/rat of MDMA by itself produced amnesia. Interestingly, pre-test intra-CeA injection of mecamylamine, a nACh receptor antagonist (1-2-μg/rat) or (S)-WAY 100135 (0.25-1-μg/rat), a selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist inhibited the improvement of morphine-induced amnesia which was produced by pre-test co-injection of nicotine and MDMA. Pre-test intra-CeA injection of the same doses of MDMA, mecamylamine or (S)-WAY 100135 by itself had no effect on morphine-induced amnesia. Moreover, pre-test injection of the same doses of mecamylamine or (S)-WAY 100135 into the CeA alone could not change memory retrieval. Taken together, it can be concluded that there is a functional interaction between morphine, nicotine and MDMA via the CeA nicotinic and serotonergic receptor mechanisms in passive avoidance memory retrieval. Moreover, cross state-dependent memory retrieval may have been induced between the drugs and this probably depends on the rewarding effects of the drugs. SN - 1873-7544 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25050820/Central_amygdala_nicotinic_and_5_HT1A_receptors_mediate_the_reversal_effect_of_nicotine_and_MDMA_on_morphine_induced_amnesia_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0306-4522(14)00577-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -