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Zinc bioaccumulation and ionoregulatory impacts in Fundulus heteroclitus exposed to sublethal waterborne zinc at different salinities.

Abstract

Exposure of Fundulus heteroclitus to an environmentally relevant Zn concentration (500 μg L⁻¹) at different salinities (0, 3.5, 10.5, and 35 ppt) revealed the following effects: (i) plasma [Zn] doubled after exposure at 0 ppt, a response which was eliminated at 35 ppt. Tissue [Zn] also increased in gill, liver, intestine, and carcass at 0 ppt. (ii) Both branchial and intestinal Ca2⁺ ATPase activities decreased in response to Zn at 0 ppt and were elevated at 35 ppt. Plasma [Ca] decreased by 50% at 0 ppt and by 30% at 3.5 ppt and increased by 20% at 35 ppt. Gill [Ca] decreased by 35% at 0 ppt and increased by about 30% at all higher salinities. (iii) Branchial Na⁺,K⁺ ATPase activity decreased by 50% at 0 ppt, increased by 30% and 90% at 10.5 and 35 ppt respectively. Intestinal Na⁺,K⁺ ATPase activity was reduced by 30% at 0 ppt. (iv) Plasma [Na] decreased by 30% at 0 ppt in Zn-exposed. Zn exposure also disturbed the homeostasis of tissue cations (Na⁺, K⁺, Ca⁺⁺, Mg⁺⁺) in a tissue-specific and salinity-dependent manner. (v) Drinking rate was not altered by Zn exposure. In toxicity tests, acute Zn lethality (96-h LC50) increased in a close to linear fashion from 9.8 mg L⁻¹ at 0 ppt to 75.0 mg L⁻¹ at 35 ppt. We conclude that sublethal Zn exposure causes pathological changes in both Ca⁺⁺ and Na⁺ homeostases, and that increasing salinity exerts protective effects against both sublethal and lethal Zn toxicities.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM), Av. Roraima 1000, Santa Maria, RS, Brazil 97105-900. Electronic address: vania.loro@gmail.com.Universidade Federal do Rio Grande (FURG), Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Rio Grande, RS, Brazil 96201-900.Dept. of Biology, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4K1.Dept. of Biology, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4K1.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25051304

Citation

Loro, Vania Lucia, et al. "Zinc Bioaccumulation and Ionoregulatory Impacts in Fundulus Heteroclitus Exposed to Sublethal Waterborne Zinc at Different Salinities." Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Toxicology & Pharmacology : CBP, vol. 166, 2014, pp. 96-104.
Loro VL, Nogueira L, Nadella SR, et al. Zinc bioaccumulation and ionoregulatory impacts in Fundulus heteroclitus exposed to sublethal waterborne zinc at different salinities. Comp Biochem Physiol C Toxicol Pharmacol. 2014;166:96-104.
Loro, V. L., Nogueira, L., Nadella, S. R., & Wood, C. M. (2014). Zinc bioaccumulation and ionoregulatory impacts in Fundulus heteroclitus exposed to sublethal waterborne zinc at different salinities. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Toxicology & Pharmacology : CBP, 166, 96-104. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpc.2014.07.004
Loro VL, et al. Zinc Bioaccumulation and Ionoregulatory Impacts in Fundulus Heteroclitus Exposed to Sublethal Waterborne Zinc at Different Salinities. Comp Biochem Physiol C Toxicol Pharmacol. 2014;166:96-104. PubMed PMID: 25051304.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Zinc bioaccumulation and ionoregulatory impacts in Fundulus heteroclitus exposed to sublethal waterborne zinc at different salinities. AU - Loro,Vania Lucia, AU - Nogueira,Lygia, AU - Nadella,Sunita R, AU - Wood,Chris M, Y1 - 2014/07/19/ PY - 2014/03/19/received PY - 2014/06/09/revised PY - 2014/07/14/accepted PY - 2014/7/23/entrez PY - 2014/7/23/pubmed PY - 2015/5/16/medline KW - Ca(2+) ATPase KW - Calcium homeostasis KW - Killifish KW - Na(+),K(+) ATPase KW - Salinity KW - Sodium homeostasis KW - Zinc SP - 96 EP - 104 JF - Comparative biochemistry and physiology. Toxicology & pharmacology : CBP JO - Comp. Biochem. Physiol. C Toxicol. Pharmacol. VL - 166 N2 - Exposure of Fundulus heteroclitus to an environmentally relevant Zn concentration (500 μg L⁻¹) at different salinities (0, 3.5, 10.5, and 35 ppt) revealed the following effects: (i) plasma [Zn] doubled after exposure at 0 ppt, a response which was eliminated at 35 ppt. Tissue [Zn] also increased in gill, liver, intestine, and carcass at 0 ppt. (ii) Both branchial and intestinal Ca2⁺ ATPase activities decreased in response to Zn at 0 ppt and were elevated at 35 ppt. Plasma [Ca] decreased by 50% at 0 ppt and by 30% at 3.5 ppt and increased by 20% at 35 ppt. Gill [Ca] decreased by 35% at 0 ppt and increased by about 30% at all higher salinities. (iii) Branchial Na⁺,K⁺ ATPase activity decreased by 50% at 0 ppt, increased by 30% and 90% at 10.5 and 35 ppt respectively. Intestinal Na⁺,K⁺ ATPase activity was reduced by 30% at 0 ppt. (iv) Plasma [Na] decreased by 30% at 0 ppt in Zn-exposed. Zn exposure also disturbed the homeostasis of tissue cations (Na⁺, K⁺, Ca⁺⁺, Mg⁺⁺) in a tissue-specific and salinity-dependent manner. (v) Drinking rate was not altered by Zn exposure. In toxicity tests, acute Zn lethality (96-h LC50) increased in a close to linear fashion from 9.8 mg L⁻¹ at 0 ppt to 75.0 mg L⁻¹ at 35 ppt. We conclude that sublethal Zn exposure causes pathological changes in both Ca⁺⁺ and Na⁺ homeostases, and that increasing salinity exerts protective effects against both sublethal and lethal Zn toxicities. SN - 1532-0456 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25051304/Zinc_bioaccumulation_and_ionoregulatory_impacts_in_Fundulus_heteroclitus_exposed_to_sublethal_waterborne_zinc_at_different_salinities_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1532-0456(14)00090-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -