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[Elizabethkingia meningosepticum bacteremia in a patient with Bardet-Biedl syndrome and chronic renal failure].
Mikrobiyol Bul. 2014 Jul; 48(3):495-500.MB

Abstract

Elizabethkingia meningosepticum, a gram-negative opportunistic pathogen may cause life-threatening nosocomial infections especially in newborns and immunosuppressive patients. This bacterium has a peculiar antibiotic resistance profile. It is resistant to most of the antibiotics against gram-negative bacteria and susceptible to antibiotics that are used to treat gram-positive bacteria, such as vancomycin and trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole (SXT). For this reason appropriate treatment of E.meningosepticum infections are based on the proper identification of bacteria. In this report, a case of catheter-related E.meningosepticum bacteremia in a patient with chronic renal failure due to Bardet-Biedl syndrome, a genetic disorder characterized by multiorgan dysfunction, was presented. A 25-year-old male patient with Bardet-Biedl syndrome was admitted to the emergency room with the complaints of high fever with shivers that started the day before. The patient had a femoral dialysis catheter. Venous blood samples drawn at the time of administration were cultured immediately. Two days later, blood cultures which yielded positive signals were passaged onto blood and MacConkey agar plates and after incubation at 37°C for 16 hours, wet-raised colonies with clear margin, gray colour and large size similar to gram-negative bacterial colonies were detected on blood agar medium. No growth was observed on MacConkey agar plate at the end of five days. The isolate was found positive for KOH, oxidase, catalase, urease, esculine and MOI (Motility Indole Ornithine) tests, whereas it was citrate negative. Gram staining revealed faintly stained thin gram-negative bacilli. The isolate was identified as E.meningosepticum by Vitek® 2 system (bioMérieux, USA), and confirmed by sequence analysis of 16S RNA gene region amplified with PCR method. The antibiotic susceptibility profile of the strain was detected by the Vitek 2 system, while vancomycin susceptibility was investigated by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. The isolate was found resistant to ampicillin/sulbactam, piperacillin/tazobactam, ceftazidime, cefepime, meropenem, imipenem, amikacin, gentamicin, netilmicin, levofloxacin, tetracycline, colistin and rifampicin; intermediate to tigecyclin and tetracyclin; susceptible to cefoperazone/sulbactam, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, SXT and vancomycin. One gram vancomycin once every four days was administered to the patient, however on the ninth day of the treatment he developed fever again. Blood cultures obtained again yielded E.meningosepticum. After changing his dialysis catheter and extending the vancomycin treatment to 15 days, the patient was discharged with cure. In conclusion, clinicians should consider E.meningosepticum as a possible causative agent of bacteremia non-responsive to the empirical antibiotic regimens and when gram-negative bacteria are isolated from the blood cultures of such patients with underlying diseases. Accurate and prompt identification of E.meningosepticum will allow immediate administration of the specific antibiotic treatment, thereby decreasing the mortality and morbidity rates.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Istanbul Educational and Research Hospital, Department of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology, Istanbul, Turkey. burcubayrak85@gmail.com.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
English Abstract
Journal Article

Language

tur

PubMed ID

25052117

Citation

Bayrak, Burcu, et al. "[Elizabethkingia Meningosepticum Bacteremia in a Patient With Bardet-Biedl Syndrome and Chronic Renal Failure]." Mikrobiyoloji Bulteni, vol. 48, no. 3, 2014, pp. 495-500.
Bayrak B, Fıncanci M, Bınay UD, et al. [Elizabethkingia meningosepticum bacteremia in a patient with Bardet-Biedl syndrome and chronic renal failure]. Mikrobiyol Bul. 2014;48(3):495-500.
Bayrak, B., Fıncanci, M., Bınay, U. D., Çımen, C., & Özkantar Ünlügüneş, G. U. (2014). [Elizabethkingia meningosepticum bacteremia in a patient with Bardet-Biedl syndrome and chronic renal failure]. Mikrobiyoloji Bulteni, 48(3), 495-500.
Bayrak B, et al. [Elizabethkingia Meningosepticum Bacteremia in a Patient With Bardet-Biedl Syndrome and Chronic Renal Failure]. Mikrobiyol Bul. 2014;48(3):495-500. PubMed PMID: 25052117.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Elizabethkingia meningosepticum bacteremia in a patient with Bardet-Biedl syndrome and chronic renal failure]. AU - Bayrak,Burcu, AU - Fıncanci,Muzaffer, AU - Bınay,Umut Devrim, AU - Çımen,Cansu, AU - Özkantar Ünlügüneş,Gülay Ulkü, PY - 2014/7/24/entrez PY - 2014/7/24/pubmed PY - 2014/11/14/medline SP - 495 EP - 500 JF - Mikrobiyoloji bulteni JO - Mikrobiyol Bul VL - 48 IS - 3 N2 - Elizabethkingia meningosepticum, a gram-negative opportunistic pathogen may cause life-threatening nosocomial infections especially in newborns and immunosuppressive patients. This bacterium has a peculiar antibiotic resistance profile. It is resistant to most of the antibiotics against gram-negative bacteria and susceptible to antibiotics that are used to treat gram-positive bacteria, such as vancomycin and trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole (SXT). For this reason appropriate treatment of E.meningosepticum infections are based on the proper identification of bacteria. In this report, a case of catheter-related E.meningosepticum bacteremia in a patient with chronic renal failure due to Bardet-Biedl syndrome, a genetic disorder characterized by multiorgan dysfunction, was presented. A 25-year-old male patient with Bardet-Biedl syndrome was admitted to the emergency room with the complaints of high fever with shivers that started the day before. The patient had a femoral dialysis catheter. Venous blood samples drawn at the time of administration were cultured immediately. Two days later, blood cultures which yielded positive signals were passaged onto blood and MacConkey agar plates and after incubation at 37°C for 16 hours, wet-raised colonies with clear margin, gray colour and large size similar to gram-negative bacterial colonies were detected on blood agar medium. No growth was observed on MacConkey agar plate at the end of five days. The isolate was found positive for KOH, oxidase, catalase, urease, esculine and MOI (Motility Indole Ornithine) tests, whereas it was citrate negative. Gram staining revealed faintly stained thin gram-negative bacilli. The isolate was identified as E.meningosepticum by Vitek® 2 system (bioMérieux, USA), and confirmed by sequence analysis of 16S RNA gene region amplified with PCR method. The antibiotic susceptibility profile of the strain was detected by the Vitek 2 system, while vancomycin susceptibility was investigated by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. The isolate was found resistant to ampicillin/sulbactam, piperacillin/tazobactam, ceftazidime, cefepime, meropenem, imipenem, amikacin, gentamicin, netilmicin, levofloxacin, tetracycline, colistin and rifampicin; intermediate to tigecyclin and tetracyclin; susceptible to cefoperazone/sulbactam, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, SXT and vancomycin. One gram vancomycin once every four days was administered to the patient, however on the ninth day of the treatment he developed fever again. Blood cultures obtained again yielded E.meningosepticum. After changing his dialysis catheter and extending the vancomycin treatment to 15 days, the patient was discharged with cure. In conclusion, clinicians should consider E.meningosepticum as a possible causative agent of bacteremia non-responsive to the empirical antibiotic regimens and when gram-negative bacteria are isolated from the blood cultures of such patients with underlying diseases. Accurate and prompt identification of E.meningosepticum will allow immediate administration of the specific antibiotic treatment, thereby decreasing the mortality and morbidity rates. SN - 0374-9096 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25052117/[Elizabethkingia_meningosepticum_bacteremia_in_a_patient_with_Bardet_Biedl_syndrome_and_chronic_renal_failure]_ L2 - http://www.mikrobiyolbul.org/linkout.aspx?pmid=25052117 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -