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Evaluation of various biomarkers as potential mediators of the association between coffee consumption and incident type 2 diabetes in the EPIC-Potsdam Study.
Am J Clin Nutr 2014; 100(3):891-900AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The inverse association between coffee consumption and the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is well established; however, little is known about potential mediators of this association.

OBJECTIVE

We aimed to investigate the association between coffee consumption and diabetes-related biomarkers and their potential role as mediators of the association between coffee consumption and T2D.

DESIGN

We analyzed a case-cohort study (subcohort: n = 1610; verified incident T2D cases: n = 417) nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Potsdam study involving 27,548 middle-aged participants. Habitual coffee consumption was assessed with a validated, semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire. We evaluated the association between coffee consumption and several T2D-related biomarkers, such as liver markers (reflected by γ-glutamyltransferase, fetuin-A, and sex hormone-binding globulin), markers of dyslipidemia (high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides), inflammation [C-reactive protein (CRP)], an adipokine (adiponectin), and metabolites, stratified by sex.

RESULTS

Coffee consumption was inversely associated with diacyl-phosphatidylcholine C32:1 in both sexes and with phenylalanine in men, as well as positively associated with acyl-alkyl-phosphatidylcholines C34:3, C40:6, and C42:5 in women. Furthermore, coffee consumption was inversely associated with fetuin-A (P-trend = 0.06) and CRP in women and γ-glutamyltransferase and triglycerides in men. Coffee consumption tended to be inversely associated with T2D risk in both sexes, reaching significance only in men [HR (95% CI): women: ≥4 compared with >0 to <2 cups coffee/d: 0.78 (0.46, 1.33); men: ≥5 compared with >0 to <2 cups coffee/d: 0.40 (0.19, 0.81)]. The association between coffee consumption and T2D risk in men was slightly reduced after adjustment for phenylalanine or lipid markers.

CONCLUSIONS

Coffee consumption was inversely associated with a diacyl-phosphatidylcholine and liver markers in both sexes and positively associated with certain acyl-alkyl-phosphatidylcholines in women. Furthermore, coffee consumption showed an inverse trend with CRP in women and with triglycerides and phenylalanine in men. However, these markers explained only to a small extent the inverse association between long-term coffee consumption and T2D risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the Departments of Molecular Epidemiology (SJ, JK, and MBS) and Epidemiology (A Floegel, HB, CW, and DD), German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany; Institute of Experimental Genetics, Genome Analysis Center, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany (CP and JA); Molecular Epidemiology Group, Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine Berlin-Buch, Berlin, Germany (TP); the Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetology, Nephrology, Vascular Disease, and Clinical Chemistry, University Hospital of the Eberhard Karls University, Tübingen, Germany (A Fritsche); Institute for Diabetes Research and Metabolic Diseases of the Helmholz Centre Munich at the University of Tübingen (IDM), Tübingen, Germany (A Fritsche); the Department for Clinical Chemistry and Pathobiochemistry, Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany (BI); and the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), Neuherberg, Germany (SJ, A Fritsche, JK, and MBS).From the Departments of Molecular Epidemiology (SJ, JK, and MBS) and Epidemiology (A Floegel, HB, CW, and DD), German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany; Institute of Experimental Genetics, Genome Analysis Center, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany (CP and JA); Molecular Epidemiology Group, Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine Berlin-Buch, Berlin, Germany (TP); the Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetology, Nephrology, Vascular Disease, and Clinical Chemistry, University Hospital of the Eberhard Karls University, Tübingen, Germany (A Fritsche); Institute for Diabetes Research and Metabolic Diseases of the Helmholz Centre Munich at the University of Tübingen (IDM), Tübingen, Germany (A Fritsche); the Department for Clinical Chemistry and Pathobiochemistry, Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany (BI); and the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), Neuherberg, Germany (SJ, A Fritsche, JK, and MBS).From the Departments of Molecular Epidemiology (SJ, JK, and MBS) and Epidemiology (A Floegel, HB, CW, and DD), German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany; Institute of Experimental Genetics, Genome Analysis Center, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany (CP and JA); Molecular Epidemiology Group, Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine Berlin-Buch, Berlin, Germany (TP); the Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetology, Nephrology, Vascular Disease, and Clinical Chemistry, University Hospital of the Eberhard Karls University, Tübingen, Germany (A Fritsche); Institute for Diabetes Research and Metabolic Diseases of the Helmholz Centre Munich at the University of Tübingen (IDM), Tübingen, Germany (A Fritsche); the Department for Clinical Chemistry and Pathobiochemistry, Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany (BI); and the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), Neuherberg, Germany (SJ, A Fritsche, JK, and MBS).From the Departments of Molecular Epidemiology (SJ, JK, and MBS) and Epidemiology (A Floegel, HB, CW, and DD), German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany; Institute of Experimental Genetics, Genome Analysis Center, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany (CP and JA); Molecular Epidemiology Group, Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine Berlin-Buch, Berlin, Germany (TP); the Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetology, Nephrology, Vascular Disease, and Clinical Chemistry, University Hospital of the Eberhard Karls University, Tübingen, Germany (A Fritsche); Institute for Diabetes Research and Metabolic Diseases of the Helmholz Centre Munich at the University of Tübingen (IDM), Tübingen, Germany (A Fritsche); the Department for Clinical Chemistry and Pathobiochemistry, Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany (BI); and the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), Neuherberg, Germany (SJ, A Fritsche, JK, and MBS).From the Departments of Molecular Epidemiology (SJ, JK, and MBS) and Epidemiology (A Floegel, HB, CW, and DD), German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany; Institute of Experimental Genetics, Genome Analysis Center, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany (CP and JA); Molecular Epidemiology Group, Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine Berlin-Buch, Berlin, Germany (TP); the Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetology, Nephrology, Vascular Disease, and Clinical Chemistry, University Hospital of the Eberhard Karls University, Tübingen, Germany (A Fritsche); Institute for Diabetes Research and Metabolic Diseases of the Helmholz Centre Munich at the University of Tübingen (IDM), Tübingen, Germany (A Fritsche); the Department for Clinical Chemistry and Pathobiochemistry, Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany (BI); and the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), Neuherberg, Germany (SJ, A Fritsche, JK, and MBS).From the Departments of Molecular Epidemiology (SJ, JK, and MBS) and Epidemiology (A Floegel, HB, CW, and DD), German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany; Institute of Experimental Genetics, Genome Analysis Center, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany (CP and JA); Molecular Epidemiology Group, Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine Berlin-Buch, Berlin, Germany (TP); the Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetology, Nephrology, Vascular Disease, and Clinical Chemistry, University Hospital of the Eberhard Karls University, Tübingen, Germany (A Fritsche); Institute for Diabetes Research and Metabolic Diseases of the Helmholz Centre Munich at the University of Tübingen (IDM), Tübingen, Germany (A Fritsche); the Department for Clinical Chemistry and Pathobiochemistry, Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany (BI); and the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), Neuherberg, Germany (SJ, A Fritsche, JK, and MBS).From the Departments of Molecular Epidemiology (SJ, JK, and MBS) and Epidemiology (A Floegel, HB, CW, and DD), German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany; Institute of Experimental Genetics, Genome Analysis Center, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany (CP and JA); Molecular Epidemiology Group, Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine Berlin-Buch, Berlin, Germany (TP); the Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetology, Nephrology, Vascular Disease, and Clinical Chemistry, University Hospital of the Eberhard Karls University, Tübingen, Germany (A Fritsche); Institute for Diabetes Research and Metabolic Diseases of the Helmholz Centre Munich at the University of Tübingen (IDM), Tübingen, Germany (A Fritsche); the Department for Clinical Chemistry and Pathobiochemistry, Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany (BI); and the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), Neuherberg, Germany (SJ, A Fritsche, JK, and MBS).From the Departments of Molecular Epidemiology (SJ, JK, and MBS) and Epidemiology (A Floegel, HB, CW, and DD), German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany; Institute of Experimental Genetics, Genome Analysis Center, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany (CP and JA); Molecular Epidemiology Group, Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine Berlin-Buch, Berlin, Germany (TP); the Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetology, Nephrology, Vascular Disease, and Clinical Chemistry, University Hospital of the Eberhard Karls University, Tübingen, Germany (A Fritsche); Institute for Diabetes Research and Metabolic Diseases of the Helmholz Centre Munich at the University of Tübingen (IDM), Tübingen, Germany (A Fritsche); the Department for Clinical Chemistry and Pathobiochemistry, Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany (BI); and the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), Neuherberg, Germany (SJ, A Fritsche, JK, and MBS).From the Departments of Molecular Epidemiology (SJ, JK, and MBS) and Epidemiology (A Floegel, HB, CW, and DD), German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany; Institute of Experimental Genetics, Genome Analysis Center, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany (CP and JA); Molecular Epidemiology Group, Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine Berlin-Buch, Berlin, Germany (TP); the Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetology, Nephrology, Vascular Disease, and Clinical Chemistry, University Hospital of the Eberhard Karls University, Tübingen, Germany (A Fritsche); Institute for Diabetes Research and Metabolic Diseases of the Helmholz Centre Munich at the University of Tübingen (IDM), Tübingen, Germany (A Fritsche); the Department for Clinical Chemistry and Pathobiochemistry, Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany (BI); and the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), Neuherberg, Germany (SJ, A Fritsche, JK, and MBS).From the Departments of Molecular Epidemiology (SJ, JK, and MBS) and Epidemiology (A Floegel, HB, CW, and DD), German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany; Institute of Experimental Genetics, Genome Analysis Center, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany (CP and JA); Molecular Epidemiology Group, Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine Berlin-Buch, Berlin, Germany (TP); the Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetology, Nephrology, Vascular Disease, and Clinical Chemistry, University Hospital of the Eberhard Karls University, Tübingen, Germany (A Fritsche); Institute for Diabetes Research and Metabolic Diseases of the Helmholz Centre Munich at the University of Tübingen (IDM), Tübingen, Germany (A Fritsche); the Department for Clinical Chemistry and Pathobiochemistry, Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany (BI); and the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), Neuherberg, Germany (SJ, A Fritsche, JK, and MBS).From the Departments of Molecular Epidemiology (SJ, JK, and MBS) and Epidemiology (A Floegel, HB, CW, and DD), German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany; Institute of Experimental Genetics, Genome Analysis Center, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany (CP and JA); Molecular Epidemiology Group, Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine Berlin-Buch, Berlin, Germany (TP); the Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetology, Nephrology, Vascular Disease, and Clinical Chemistry, University Hospital of the Eberhard Karls University, Tübingen, Germany (A Fritsche); Institute for Diabetes Research and Metabolic Diseases of the Helmholz Centre Munich at the University of Tübingen (IDM), Tübingen, Germany (A Fritsche); the Department for Clinical Chemistry and Pathobiochemistry, Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany (BI); and the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), Neuherberg, Germany (SJ, A Fritsche, JK, and MBS).From the Departments of Molecular Epidemiology (SJ, JK, and MBS) and Epidemiology (A Floegel, HB, CW, and DD), German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany; Institute of Experimental Genetics, Genome Analysis Center, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany (CP and JA); Molecular Epidemiology Group, Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine Berlin-Buch, Berlin, Germany (TP); the Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetology, Nephrology, Vascular Disease, and Clinical Chemistry, University Hospital of the Eberhard Karls University, Tübingen, Germany (A Fritsche); Institute for Diabetes Research and Metabolic Diseases of the Helmholz Centre Munich at the University of Tübingen (IDM), Tübingen, Germany (A Fritsche); the Department for Clinical Chemistry and Pathobiochemistry, Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany (BI); and the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), Neuherberg, Germany (SJ, A Fritsche, JK, and MBS).

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25057154

Citation

Jacobs, Simone, et al. "Evaluation of Various Biomarkers as Potential Mediators of the Association Between Coffee Consumption and Incident Type 2 Diabetes in the EPIC-Potsdam Study." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 100, no. 3, 2014, pp. 891-900.
Jacobs S, Kröger J, Floegel A, et al. Evaluation of various biomarkers as potential mediators of the association between coffee consumption and incident type 2 diabetes in the EPIC-Potsdam Study. Am J Clin Nutr. 2014;100(3):891-900.
Jacobs, S., Kröger, J., Floegel, A., Boeing, H., Drogan, D., Pischon, T., ... Schulze, M. B. (2014). Evaluation of various biomarkers as potential mediators of the association between coffee consumption and incident type 2 diabetes in the EPIC-Potsdam Study. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 100(3), pp. 891-900. doi:10.3945/ajcn.113.080317.
Jacobs S, et al. Evaluation of Various Biomarkers as Potential Mediators of the Association Between Coffee Consumption and Incident Type 2 Diabetes in the EPIC-Potsdam Study. Am J Clin Nutr. 2014;100(3):891-900. PubMed PMID: 25057154.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Evaluation of various biomarkers as potential mediators of the association between coffee consumption and incident type 2 diabetes in the EPIC-Potsdam Study. AU - Jacobs,Simone, AU - Kröger,Janine, AU - Floegel,Anna, AU - Boeing,Heiner, AU - Drogan,Dagmar, AU - Pischon,Tobias, AU - Fritsche,Andreas, AU - Prehn,Cornelia, AU - Adamski,Jerzy, AU - Isermann,Berend, AU - Weikert,Cornelia, AU - Schulze,Matthias B, Y1 - 2014/07/23/ PY - 2014/7/25/entrez PY - 2014/7/25/pubmed PY - 2015/2/11/medline SP - 891 EP - 900 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 100 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: The inverse association between coffee consumption and the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is well established; however, little is known about potential mediators of this association. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate the association between coffee consumption and diabetes-related biomarkers and their potential role as mediators of the association between coffee consumption and T2D. DESIGN: We analyzed a case-cohort study (subcohort: n = 1610; verified incident T2D cases: n = 417) nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Potsdam study involving 27,548 middle-aged participants. Habitual coffee consumption was assessed with a validated, semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire. We evaluated the association between coffee consumption and several T2D-related biomarkers, such as liver markers (reflected by γ-glutamyltransferase, fetuin-A, and sex hormone-binding globulin), markers of dyslipidemia (high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides), inflammation [C-reactive protein (CRP)], an adipokine (adiponectin), and metabolites, stratified by sex. RESULTS: Coffee consumption was inversely associated with diacyl-phosphatidylcholine C32:1 in both sexes and with phenylalanine in men, as well as positively associated with acyl-alkyl-phosphatidylcholines C34:3, C40:6, and C42:5 in women. Furthermore, coffee consumption was inversely associated with fetuin-A (P-trend = 0.06) and CRP in women and γ-glutamyltransferase and triglycerides in men. Coffee consumption tended to be inversely associated with T2D risk in both sexes, reaching significance only in men [HR (95% CI): women: ≥4 compared with >0 to <2 cups coffee/d: 0.78 (0.46, 1.33); men: ≥5 compared with >0 to <2 cups coffee/d: 0.40 (0.19, 0.81)]. The association between coffee consumption and T2D risk in men was slightly reduced after adjustment for phenylalanine or lipid markers. CONCLUSIONS: Coffee consumption was inversely associated with a diacyl-phosphatidylcholine and liver markers in both sexes and positively associated with certain acyl-alkyl-phosphatidylcholines in women. Furthermore, coffee consumption showed an inverse trend with CRP in women and with triglycerides and phenylalanine in men. However, these markers explained only to a small extent the inverse association between long-term coffee consumption and T2D risk. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25057154/Evaluation_of_various_biomarkers_as_potential_mediators_of_the_association_between_coffee_consumption_and_incident_type_2_diabetes_in_the_EPIC_Potsdam_Study_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.113.080317 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -