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Prevalence of metabolic syndrome among Hispanics/Latinos of diverse background: the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.
Diabetes Care. 2014 Aug; 37(8):2391-9.DC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Approximately one-third of the adult U.S. population has the metabolic syndrome. Its prevalence is the highest among Hispanic adults, but variation by Hispanic/Latino background is unknown. Our objective was to quantify the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among men and women 18-74 years of age of diverse Hispanic/Latino background.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS

Two-stage area probability sample of households in four U.S. locales, yielding 16,319 adults (52% women) who self-identified as Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, Central American, or South American. The metabolic syndrome was defined according to the American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute 2009 Joint Scientific Statement. The main outcome measures were age-standardized prevalence of the metabolic syndrome per the harmonized American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute definition and its component abnormalities.

RESULTS

The metabolic syndrome was present in 36% of women and 34% of men. Differences in the age-standardized prevalence were seen by age, sex, and Hispanic/Latino background. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among those 18-44, 45-64, and 65-74 years of age was 23%, 50%, and 62%, respectively, among women; and 25%, 43%, and 55%, respectively, among men. Among women, the metabolic syndrome prevalence ranged from 27% in South Americans to 41% in Puerto Ricans. Among men, prevalences ranged from 27% in South Americans to 35% in Cubans. In those with the metabolic syndrome, abdominal obesity was present in 96% of the women compared with 73% of the men; more men (73%) than women (62%) had hyperglycemia.

CONCLUSIONS

The burden of cardiometabolic abnormalities is high in Hispanic/Latinos but varies by age, sex, and Hispanic/Latino background. Hispanics/Latinos are thus at increased, but modifiable, predicted lifetime risk of diabetes and its cardiovascular sequelae.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC gerardo_heiss@unc.edu.Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC.Department of Biostatistics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC.Department of Psychology and Behavioral Medicine Research Center, University of Miami, Miami, FL.Department of Psychology and Behavioral Medicine Research Center, University of Miami, Miami, FL.National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.Preventive Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL.Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY.Preventive Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL.Department of Psychology, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA.Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC.Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25061141

Citation

Heiss, Gerardo, et al. "Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome Among Hispanics/Latinos of Diverse Background: the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos." Diabetes Care, vol. 37, no. 8, 2014, pp. 2391-9.
Heiss G, Snyder ML, Teng Y, et al. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome among Hispanics/Latinos of diverse background: the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. Diabetes Care. 2014;37(8):2391-9.
Heiss, G., Snyder, M. L., Teng, Y., Schneiderman, N., Llabre, M. M., Cowie, C., Carnethon, M., Kaplan, R., Giachello, A., Gallo, L., Loehr, L., & Avilés-Santa, L. (2014). Prevalence of metabolic syndrome among Hispanics/Latinos of diverse background: the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. Diabetes Care, 37(8), 2391-9. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc13-2505
Heiss G, et al. Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome Among Hispanics/Latinos of Diverse Background: the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. Diabetes Care. 2014;37(8):2391-9. PubMed PMID: 25061141.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence of metabolic syndrome among Hispanics/Latinos of diverse background: the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. AU - Heiss,Gerardo, AU - Snyder,Michelle L, AU - Teng,Yanping, AU - Schneiderman,Neil, AU - Llabre,Maria M, AU - Cowie,Catherine, AU - Carnethon,Mercedes, AU - Kaplan,Robert, AU - Giachello,Aida, AU - Gallo,Linda, AU - Loehr,Laura, AU - Avilés-Santa,Larissa, PY - 2014/7/26/entrez PY - 2014/7/26/pubmed PY - 2015/6/18/medline SP - 2391 EP - 9 JF - Diabetes care JO - Diabetes Care VL - 37 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Approximately one-third of the adult U.S. population has the metabolic syndrome. Its prevalence is the highest among Hispanic adults, but variation by Hispanic/Latino background is unknown. Our objective was to quantify the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among men and women 18-74 years of age of diverse Hispanic/Latino background. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Two-stage area probability sample of households in four U.S. locales, yielding 16,319 adults (52% women) who self-identified as Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, Central American, or South American. The metabolic syndrome was defined according to the American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute 2009 Joint Scientific Statement. The main outcome measures were age-standardized prevalence of the metabolic syndrome per the harmonized American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute definition and its component abnormalities. RESULTS: The metabolic syndrome was present in 36% of women and 34% of men. Differences in the age-standardized prevalence were seen by age, sex, and Hispanic/Latino background. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among those 18-44, 45-64, and 65-74 years of age was 23%, 50%, and 62%, respectively, among women; and 25%, 43%, and 55%, respectively, among men. Among women, the metabolic syndrome prevalence ranged from 27% in South Americans to 41% in Puerto Ricans. Among men, prevalences ranged from 27% in South Americans to 35% in Cubans. In those with the metabolic syndrome, abdominal obesity was present in 96% of the women compared with 73% of the men; more men (73%) than women (62%) had hyperglycemia. CONCLUSIONS: The burden of cardiometabolic abnormalities is high in Hispanic/Latinos but varies by age, sex, and Hispanic/Latino background. Hispanics/Latinos are thus at increased, but modifiable, predicted lifetime risk of diabetes and its cardiovascular sequelae. SN - 1935-5548 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25061141/Prevalence_of_metabolic_syndrome_among_Hispanics/Latinos_of_diverse_background:_the_Hispanic_Community_Health_Study/Study_of_Latinos_ L2 - http://care.diabetesjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=25061141 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -