Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Enterically transmitted non-A, non-B hepatitis: recovery of virus-like particles from an epidemic in south Delhi and transmission studies in rhesus monkeys.

Abstract

An epidemic of viral hepatitis, serologically characterized as due to non-A, non-B hepatitis, occurred in a village of South Delhi, India, in December, 1986, through January, 1987. Water contaminated with fecal matter was the apparent source of infection. Disease-associated virus-like particles were detected by immune electron microscopy in the feces of three patients within 5 days of illness. The virus-like particles were agglutinated by autologous acute-phase serum but not by convalescent serum. Rhesus monkeys inoculated with particle-containing fecal suspensions developed biochemical and morphologic features of acute, self-limited hepatitis. The findings in the present study and in earlier investigations of sporadic non-A, non-B hepatitis suggest that (i) the epidemic form and a proportion of sporadic cases of this infection in India may be related, both being enterically transmitted and associated with infection by a 27- to 32-nm virus-like particle, (ii) antibody responses to this virus occur early in disease and are transient and (iii) the rhesus monkey may prove to be a suitable model for studies of epidemic non-A, non-B hepatitis.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Pathology, All-India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi.

    , , ,

    Source

    Hepatology (Baltimore, Md.) 10:4 1989 Oct pg 466-72

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Alanine Transaminase
    Animals
    Aspartate Aminotransferases
    Child
    Disease Outbreaks
    Feces
    Female
    Hepatitis C
    Hepatitis, Viral, Human
    Humans
    India
    Liver
    Macaca mulatta
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Virion
    Water Microbiology

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    2506121

    Citation

    Panda, S K., et al. "Enterically Transmitted non-A, non-B Hepatitis: Recovery of Virus-like Particles From an Epidemic in South Delhi and Transmission Studies in Rhesus Monkeys." Hepatology (Baltimore, Md.), vol. 10, no. 4, 1989, pp. 466-72.
    Panda SK, Datta R, Kaur J, et al. Enterically transmitted non-A, non-B hepatitis: recovery of virus-like particles from an epidemic in south Delhi and transmission studies in rhesus monkeys. Hepatology. 1989;10(4):466-72.
    Panda, S. K., Datta, R., Kaur, J., Zuckerman, A. J., & Nayak, N. C. (1989). Enterically transmitted non-A, non-B hepatitis: recovery of virus-like particles from an epidemic in south Delhi and transmission studies in rhesus monkeys. Hepatology (Baltimore, Md.), 10(4), pp. 466-72.
    Panda SK, et al. Enterically Transmitted non-A, non-B Hepatitis: Recovery of Virus-like Particles From an Epidemic in South Delhi and Transmission Studies in Rhesus Monkeys. Hepatology. 1989;10(4):466-72. PubMed PMID: 2506121.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Enterically transmitted non-A, non-B hepatitis: recovery of virus-like particles from an epidemic in south Delhi and transmission studies in rhesus monkeys. AU - Panda,S K, AU - Datta,R, AU - Kaur,J, AU - Zuckerman,A J, AU - Nayak,N C, PY - 1989/10/1/pubmed PY - 1989/10/1/medline PY - 1989/10/1/entrez SP - 466 EP - 72 JF - Hepatology (Baltimore, Md.) JO - Hepatology VL - 10 IS - 4 N2 - An epidemic of viral hepatitis, serologically characterized as due to non-A, non-B hepatitis, occurred in a village of South Delhi, India, in December, 1986, through January, 1987. Water contaminated with fecal matter was the apparent source of infection. Disease-associated virus-like particles were detected by immune electron microscopy in the feces of three patients within 5 days of illness. The virus-like particles were agglutinated by autologous acute-phase serum but not by convalescent serum. Rhesus monkeys inoculated with particle-containing fecal suspensions developed biochemical and morphologic features of acute, self-limited hepatitis. The findings in the present study and in earlier investigations of sporadic non-A, non-B hepatitis suggest that (i) the epidemic form and a proportion of sporadic cases of this infection in India may be related, both being enterically transmitted and associated with infection by a 27- to 32-nm virus-like particle, (ii) antibody responses to this virus occur early in disease and are transient and (iii) the rhesus monkey may prove to be a suitable model for studies of epidemic non-A, non-B hepatitis. SN - 0270-9139 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2506121/Enterically_transmitted_non_A_non_B_hepatitis:_recovery_of_virus_like_particles_from_an_epidemic_in_south_Delhi_and_transmission_studies_in_rhesus_monkeys_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0270-9139&date=1989&volume=10&issue=4&spage=466 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -