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Dietary patterns and cognitive dysfunction in a 12-year follow-up study of 70 year old men.
J Alzheimers Dis 2015; 43(1):109-19JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Adherence to dietary patterns has been associated with cognitive decline and dementia, but studies are inconsistent.

OBJECTIVE

Dietary patterns, i.e., WHO recommendations (Healthy Diet Indicator), a Mediterranean-like diet (modified Mediterranean Diet Score, mMDS), and a low carbohydrate high protein diet (LCHP), were related to incident cognitive dysfunction, as indicated by Alzheimer's disease (AD), all-type dementia, and all-type cognitive impairment, in a cohort of 1,138 elderly Swedish men.

METHODS

Dietary patterns were derived from 7-day records. Risk relations were calculated by Cox and logistic regression analyses, adjusted for potential confounders. Sensitivity analysis was performed in a subpopulation (n = 564) with energy intake according to the Goldberg cut-off.

RESULTS

During a mean follow-up of 12 years, 84, 143, and 198 men developed AD, all-type dementia, and all-type cognitive impairment, respectively. There was no association between Healthy Diet Indicator and any of the outcomes. Hazard ratios associated with 1 standard deviation (SD) increment in the LCHP score were 1.16 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.95, 1.43) for AD and 1.16 (95% CI: 0.99, 1.37) for all-type dementia. mMDS was not associated with dementia diagnosis. Odds ratio (OR)/1 SD increase for mMDS and all-type cognitive impairment was 0.82 (95% CI: 0.65, 1.05). In the subpopulation OR for mMDS and all-type cognitive impairment was 0.32 (95% CI: 0.11, 0.89).

CONCLUSION

We found no strong associations with development of cognitive dysfunction for any of the dietary patterns investigated. However, there was a potentially beneficial association for a Mediterranean-like diet on the development of cognitive dysfunction in the subpopulation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopedics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25062901

Citation

Olsson, Erika, et al. "Dietary Patterns and Cognitive Dysfunction in a 12-year Follow-up Study of 70 Year Old Men." Journal of Alzheimer's Disease : JAD, vol. 43, no. 1, 2015, pp. 109-19.
Olsson E, Karlström B, Kilander L, et al. Dietary patterns and cognitive dysfunction in a 12-year follow-up study of 70 year old men. J Alzheimers Dis. 2015;43(1):109-19.
Olsson, E., Karlström, B., Kilander, L., Byberg, L., Cederholm, T., & Sjögren, P. (2015). Dietary patterns and cognitive dysfunction in a 12-year follow-up study of 70 year old men. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease : JAD, 43(1), pp. 109-19. doi:10.3233/JAD-140867.
Olsson E, et al. Dietary Patterns and Cognitive Dysfunction in a 12-year Follow-up Study of 70 Year Old Men. J Alzheimers Dis. 2015;43(1):109-19. PubMed PMID: 25062901.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary patterns and cognitive dysfunction in a 12-year follow-up study of 70 year old men. AU - Olsson,Erika, AU - Karlström,Brita, AU - Kilander,Lena, AU - Byberg,Liisa, AU - Cederholm,Tommy, AU - Sjögren,Per, PY - 2014/7/27/entrez PY - 2014/7/27/pubmed PY - 2016/1/16/medline KW - Alzheimer's disease KW - Mediterranean diet KW - cognition disorders KW - cohort study KW - dementia KW - diet KW - dietary carbohydrates KW - dietary proteins SP - 109 EP - 19 JF - Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD JO - J. Alzheimers Dis. VL - 43 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Adherence to dietary patterns has been associated with cognitive decline and dementia, but studies are inconsistent. OBJECTIVE: Dietary patterns, i.e., WHO recommendations (Healthy Diet Indicator), a Mediterranean-like diet (modified Mediterranean Diet Score, mMDS), and a low carbohydrate high protein diet (LCHP), were related to incident cognitive dysfunction, as indicated by Alzheimer's disease (AD), all-type dementia, and all-type cognitive impairment, in a cohort of 1,138 elderly Swedish men. METHODS: Dietary patterns were derived from 7-day records. Risk relations were calculated by Cox and logistic regression analyses, adjusted for potential confounders. Sensitivity analysis was performed in a subpopulation (n = 564) with energy intake according to the Goldberg cut-off. RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 12 years, 84, 143, and 198 men developed AD, all-type dementia, and all-type cognitive impairment, respectively. There was no association between Healthy Diet Indicator and any of the outcomes. Hazard ratios associated with 1 standard deviation (SD) increment in the LCHP score were 1.16 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.95, 1.43) for AD and 1.16 (95% CI: 0.99, 1.37) for all-type dementia. mMDS was not associated with dementia diagnosis. Odds ratio (OR)/1 SD increase for mMDS and all-type cognitive impairment was 0.82 (95% CI: 0.65, 1.05). In the subpopulation OR for mMDS and all-type cognitive impairment was 0.32 (95% CI: 0.11, 0.89). CONCLUSION: We found no strong associations with development of cognitive dysfunction for any of the dietary patterns investigated. However, there was a potentially beneficial association for a Mediterranean-like diet on the development of cognitive dysfunction in the subpopulation. SN - 1875-8908 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25062901/Dietary_patterns_and_cognitive_dysfunction_in_a_12_year_follow_up_study_of_70_year_old_men_ L2 - https://content.iospress.com/openurl?genre=article&id=doi:10.3233/JAD-140867 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -