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Indoor tanning in businesses and homes and risk of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer in 2 US case-control studies.
J Am Acad Dermatol 2014; 71(5):882-7JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Indoor tanning increases skin cancer risk. Beyond early research describing melanoma and sun lamps, few recent reports describe where individuals indoor tan and whether skin cancer risk varies by location (business, home-based).

OBJECTIVE

We sought to assess where individuals tanned indoors and skin cancer risk by tanning device location.

METHODS

Multivariate logistic regression was conducted in 2 US case-control studies of melanoma (1161 cases, 1083 controls, ages 25-59 years) and early-onset basal cell carcinoma (375 cases, 382 controls, age<40 years) conducted between 2004 and 2010.

RESULTS

Most indoor tanners (86.4%-95.1%), especially younger individuals, tanned exclusively in businesses. Persons who used indoor tanning exclusively in businesses were at increased risk of melanoma (odds ratio 1.82, 95% confidence interval 1.47-2.26) and basal cell carcinoma (odds ratio 1.69, 95% confidence interval 1.15-2.48) compared with non-users. Melanoma risk was also increased in the small number who reported tanning indoors only at home relative to non-users (odds ratio 4.14, 95% confidence interval 1.75-9.78); 67.6% used sun lamps.

LIMITATIONS

Self-reported tanning and potential recall bias are limitations.

CONCLUSION

Business-only tanning, despite claims of "safe" tanning, was positively associated with a significant risk of melanoma and basal cell carcinoma. Home tanning was uncommon and mostly from sun lamps, which were rarely used by younger participants. Regardless of location, indoor tanning was associated with increased risk of skin cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut; Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, Connecticut. Electronic address: leah.ferrucci@yale.edu.Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota.Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut; Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, Connecticut.Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota; Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota.Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut; Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, Connecticut.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25062934

Citation

Ferrucci, Leah M., et al. "Indoor Tanning in Businesses and Homes and Risk of Melanoma and Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer in 2 US Case-control Studies." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, vol. 71, no. 5, 2014, pp. 882-7.
Ferrucci LM, Vogel RI, Cartmel B, et al. Indoor tanning in businesses and homes and risk of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer in 2 US case-control studies. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2014;71(5):882-7.
Ferrucci, L. M., Vogel, R. I., Cartmel, B., Lazovich, D., & Mayne, S. T. (2014). Indoor tanning in businesses and homes and risk of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer in 2 US case-control studies. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 71(5), pp. 882-7. doi:10.1016/j.jaad.2014.06.046.
Ferrucci LM, et al. Indoor Tanning in Businesses and Homes and Risk of Melanoma and Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer in 2 US Case-control Studies. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2014;71(5):882-7. PubMed PMID: 25062934.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Indoor tanning in businesses and homes and risk of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer in 2 US case-control studies. AU - Ferrucci,Leah M, AU - Vogel,Rachel Isaksson, AU - Cartmel,Brenda, AU - Lazovich,DeAnn, AU - Mayne,Susan T, Y1 - 2014/07/23/ PY - 2014/01/27/received PY - 2014/06/27/revised PY - 2014/06/28/accepted PY - 2014/7/27/entrez PY - 2014/7/27/pubmed PY - 2015/1/22/medline KW - basal cell carcinoma KW - epidemiology KW - indoor tanning KW - melanoma KW - nonmelanoma skin cancer KW - skin cancer SP - 882 EP - 7 JF - Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology JO - J. Am. Acad. Dermatol. VL - 71 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Indoor tanning increases skin cancer risk. Beyond early research describing melanoma and sun lamps, few recent reports describe where individuals indoor tan and whether skin cancer risk varies by location (business, home-based). OBJECTIVE: We sought to assess where individuals tanned indoors and skin cancer risk by tanning device location. METHODS: Multivariate logistic regression was conducted in 2 US case-control studies of melanoma (1161 cases, 1083 controls, ages 25-59 years) and early-onset basal cell carcinoma (375 cases, 382 controls, age<40 years) conducted between 2004 and 2010. RESULTS: Most indoor tanners (86.4%-95.1%), especially younger individuals, tanned exclusively in businesses. Persons who used indoor tanning exclusively in businesses were at increased risk of melanoma (odds ratio 1.82, 95% confidence interval 1.47-2.26) and basal cell carcinoma (odds ratio 1.69, 95% confidence interval 1.15-2.48) compared with non-users. Melanoma risk was also increased in the small number who reported tanning indoors only at home relative to non-users (odds ratio 4.14, 95% confidence interval 1.75-9.78); 67.6% used sun lamps. LIMITATIONS: Self-reported tanning and potential recall bias are limitations. CONCLUSION: Business-only tanning, despite claims of "safe" tanning, was positively associated with a significant risk of melanoma and basal cell carcinoma. Home tanning was uncommon and mostly from sun lamps, which were rarely used by younger participants. Regardless of location, indoor tanning was associated with increased risk of skin cancer. SN - 1097-6787 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25062934/Indoor_tanning_in_businesses_and_homes_and_risk_of_melanoma_and_nonmelanoma_skin_cancer_in_2_US_case_control_studies_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0190-9622(14)01663-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -