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Tracking the time course of multi-word noun phrase production with ERPs or on when (and why) cat is faster than the big cat.
Front Psychol. 2014; 5:586.FP

Abstract

Words are rarely produced in isolation. Yet, our understanding of multi-word production, and especially its time course, is still rather poor. In this research, we use event-related potentials to examine the production of multi-word noun phrases in the context of overt picture naming. We track the processing costs associated with the production of these noun phrases as compared with the production of bare nouns, from picture onset to articulation. Behavioral results revealed longer naming latencies for French noun phrases with determiners and pre-nominal adjectives (D-A-N, the big cat) than for noun phrases with a determiner (D-N, the cat), or bare nouns (N, cat). The spatio-temporal analysis of the ERPs revealed differences in the duration of stable global electrophysiological patterns as a function of utterance format in two time windows, from ~190 to 300 ms after picture onset, and from ~530 ms after picture onset to 100 ms before articulation. These findings can be accommodated in the following model. During grammatical encoding (here from ~190 to 300 ms), the noun and adjective lemmas are accessed in parallel, followed by the selection of the gender-agreeing determiner. Phonological encoding (after ~530 ms) operates sequentially. As a consequence, the phonological encoding process is longer for longer utterances. In addition, when determiners are repeated across trials, their phonological encoding can be anticipated or primed, resulting in a shortened encoding process.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratory of Experimental Psycholinguistics, Faculty of Psychology, University of Geneva Geneva, Switzerland ; Methodology & Data Analysis, Faculty of Psychology, University of Geneva Geneva, Switzerland.Laboratory of Experimental Psycholinguistics, Faculty of Psychology, University of Geneva Geneva, Switzerland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25071615

Citation

Bürki, Audrey, and Marina Laganaro. "Tracking the Time Course of Multi-word Noun Phrase Production With ERPs or On when (and Why) Cat Is Faster Than the Big Cat." Frontiers in Psychology, vol. 5, 2014, p. 586.
Bürki A, Laganaro M. Tracking the time course of multi-word noun phrase production with ERPs or on when (and why) cat is faster than the big cat. Front Psychol. 2014;5:586.
Bürki, A., & Laganaro, M. (2014). Tracking the time course of multi-word noun phrase production with ERPs or on when (and why) cat is faster than the big cat. Frontiers in Psychology, 5, 586. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00586
Bürki A, Laganaro M. Tracking the Time Course of Multi-word Noun Phrase Production With ERPs or On when (and Why) Cat Is Faster Than the Big Cat. Front Psychol. 2014;5:586. PubMed PMID: 25071615.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Tracking the time course of multi-word noun phrase production with ERPs or on when (and why) cat is faster than the big cat. AU - Bürki,Audrey, AU - Laganaro,Marina, Y1 - 2014/07/01/ PY - 2014/01/03/received PY - 2014/05/26/accepted PY - 2014/7/30/entrez PY - 2014/7/30/pubmed PY - 2014/7/30/medline KW - ERPs (event-related potentials) KW - grammatical encoding KW - language production KW - noun phrase production KW - phonological encoding SP - 586 EP - 586 JF - Frontiers in psychology JO - Front Psychol VL - 5 N2 - Words are rarely produced in isolation. Yet, our understanding of multi-word production, and especially its time course, is still rather poor. In this research, we use event-related potentials to examine the production of multi-word noun phrases in the context of overt picture naming. We track the processing costs associated with the production of these noun phrases as compared with the production of bare nouns, from picture onset to articulation. Behavioral results revealed longer naming latencies for French noun phrases with determiners and pre-nominal adjectives (D-A-N, the big cat) than for noun phrases with a determiner (D-N, the cat), or bare nouns (N, cat). The spatio-temporal analysis of the ERPs revealed differences in the duration of stable global electrophysiological patterns as a function of utterance format in two time windows, from ~190 to 300 ms after picture onset, and from ~530 ms after picture onset to 100 ms before articulation. These findings can be accommodated in the following model. During grammatical encoding (here from ~190 to 300 ms), the noun and adjective lemmas are accessed in parallel, followed by the selection of the gender-agreeing determiner. Phonological encoding (after ~530 ms) operates sequentially. As a consequence, the phonological encoding process is longer for longer utterances. In addition, when determiners are repeated across trials, their phonological encoding can be anticipated or primed, resulting in a shortened encoding process. SN - 1664-1078 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25071615/Tracking_the_time_course_of_multi_word_noun_phrase_production_with_ERPs_or_on_when__and_why__cat_is_faster_than_the_big_cat_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00586 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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