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Early-life bisphenol a exposure and child body mass index: a prospective cohort study.
Environ Health Perspect. 2014 Nov; 122(11):1239-45.EH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Early-life exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) may increase childhood obesity risk, but few prospective epidemiological studies have investigated this relationship.

OBJECTIVE

We sought to determine whether early-life exposure to BPA was associated with increased body mass index (BMI) at 2-5 years of age in 297 mother-child pairs from Cincinnati, Ohio (HOME Study).

METHODS

Urinary BPA concentrations were measured in samples collected from pregnant women during the second and third trimesters and their children at 1 and 2 years of age. BMI z-scores were calculated from weight/height measures conducted annually from 2 through 5 years of age. We used linear mixed models to estimate BMI differences or trajectories with increasing creatinine-normalized BPA concentrations.

RESULTS

After confounder adjustment, each 10-fold increase in prenatal (β = -0.1; 95% CI: -0.5, 0.3) or early-childhood (β = -0.2; 95% CI: -0.6, 0.1) BPA concentrations was associated with a modest and nonsignificant reduction in child BMI. These inverse associations were suggestively stronger in girls than in boys [prenatal effect measure modification (EMM) p-value = 0.30, early-childhood EMM p-value = 0.05], but sex-specific associations were imprecise. Children in the highest early-childhood BPA tercile had lower BMI at 2 years (difference = -0.3; 95% CI: -0.6, 0.0) and larger increases in their BMI slope from 2 through 5 years (BMI increase per year = 0.12; 95% CI: 0.07, 0.18) than children in the lowest tercile (BMI increase per year = 0.07; 95% CI: 0.01, 0.13). All associations were attenuated without creatinine normalization.

CONCLUSIONS

Prenatal and early-childhood BPA exposures were not associated with increased BMI at 2-5 years of age, but higher early-childhood BPA exposures were associated with accelerated growth during this period.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, Brown University School of Public Health, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25073184

Citation

Braun, Joseph M., et al. "Early-life Bisphenol a Exposure and Child Body Mass Index: a Prospective Cohort Study." Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 122, no. 11, 2014, pp. 1239-45.
Braun JM, Lanphear BP, Calafat AM, et al. Early-life bisphenol a exposure and child body mass index: a prospective cohort study. Environ Health Perspect. 2014;122(11):1239-45.
Braun, J. M., Lanphear, B. P., Calafat, A. M., Deria, S., Khoury, J., Howe, C. J., & Venners, S. A. (2014). Early-life bisphenol a exposure and child body mass index: a prospective cohort study. Environmental Health Perspectives, 122(11), 1239-45. https://doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408258
Braun JM, et al. Early-life Bisphenol a Exposure and Child Body Mass Index: a Prospective Cohort Study. Environ Health Perspect. 2014;122(11):1239-45. PubMed PMID: 25073184.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Early-life bisphenol a exposure and child body mass index: a prospective cohort study. AU - Braun,Joseph M, AU - Lanphear,Bruce P, AU - Calafat,Antonia M, AU - Deria,Sirad, AU - Khoury,Jane, AU - Howe,Chanelle J, AU - Venners,Scott A, Y1 - 2014/07/29/ PY - 2014/02/10/received PY - 2014/07/25/accepted PY - 2014/7/30/entrez PY - 2014/7/30/pubmed PY - 2015/7/21/medline SP - 1239 EP - 45 JF - Environmental health perspectives JO - Environ. Health Perspect. VL - 122 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: Early-life exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) may increase childhood obesity risk, but few prospective epidemiological studies have investigated this relationship. OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine whether early-life exposure to BPA was associated with increased body mass index (BMI) at 2-5 years of age in 297 mother-child pairs from Cincinnati, Ohio (HOME Study). METHODS: Urinary BPA concentrations were measured in samples collected from pregnant women during the second and third trimesters and their children at 1 and 2 years of age. BMI z-scores were calculated from weight/height measures conducted annually from 2 through 5 years of age. We used linear mixed models to estimate BMI differences or trajectories with increasing creatinine-normalized BPA concentrations. RESULTS: After confounder adjustment, each 10-fold increase in prenatal (β = -0.1; 95% CI: -0.5, 0.3) or early-childhood (β = -0.2; 95% CI: -0.6, 0.1) BPA concentrations was associated with a modest and nonsignificant reduction in child BMI. These inverse associations were suggestively stronger in girls than in boys [prenatal effect measure modification (EMM) p-value = 0.30, early-childhood EMM p-value = 0.05], but sex-specific associations were imprecise. Children in the highest early-childhood BPA tercile had lower BMI at 2 years (difference = -0.3; 95% CI: -0.6, 0.0) and larger increases in their BMI slope from 2 through 5 years (BMI increase per year = 0.12; 95% CI: 0.07, 0.18) than children in the lowest tercile (BMI increase per year = 0.07; 95% CI: 0.01, 0.13). All associations were attenuated without creatinine normalization. CONCLUSIONS: Prenatal and early-childhood BPA exposures were not associated with increased BMI at 2-5 years of age, but higher early-childhood BPA exposures were associated with accelerated growth during this period. SN - 1552-9924 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25073184/Early_life_bisphenol_a_exposure_and_child_body_mass_index:_a_prospective_cohort_study_ L2 - https://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/doi/full/10.1289/ehp.1408258?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -