Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Bacterial gasotransmitters: an innate defense against antibiotics.
Curr Opin Microbiol. 2014 Oct; 21:13-7.CO

Abstract

In recent decades, there has been growing interest in the field of gasotransmitters, endogenous gaseous signaling molecules (NO, H2S, and CO), as regulators of a multitude of biochemical pathways and physiological processes. Most of the concerted effort has been on eukaryotic gasotransmitters until the subsequent discovery of bacterial counterparts. While the fundamental aspects of bacterial gasotransmitters remain undefined and necessitate further research, we will discuss a known specific role they play in defense against antibiotics. Considering the current dilemma of multidrug-resistant bacteria we consider it particularly prudent to exploring novel targets and approaches, of which the bacterial gasotransmitters, nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide represent.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA.Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA. Electronic address: evgeny.nudler@nyumc.org.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25078319

Citation

Luhachack, Lyly, and Evgeny Nudler. "Bacterial Gasotransmitters: an Innate Defense Against Antibiotics." Current Opinion in Microbiology, vol. 21, 2014, pp. 13-7.
Luhachack L, Nudler E. Bacterial gasotransmitters: an innate defense against antibiotics. Curr Opin Microbiol. 2014;21:13-7.
Luhachack, L., & Nudler, E. (2014). Bacterial gasotransmitters: an innate defense against antibiotics. Current Opinion in Microbiology, 21, 13-7. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mib.2014.06.017
Luhachack L, Nudler E. Bacterial Gasotransmitters: an Innate Defense Against Antibiotics. Curr Opin Microbiol. 2014;21:13-7. PubMed PMID: 25078319.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bacterial gasotransmitters: an innate defense against antibiotics. AU - Luhachack,Lyly, AU - Nudler,Evgeny, Y1 - 2014/07/30/ PY - 2014/04/25/received PY - 2014/06/20/revised PY - 2014/06/29/accepted PY - 2014/8/1/entrez PY - 2014/8/1/pubmed PY - 2015/8/22/medline SP - 13 EP - 7 JF - Current opinion in microbiology JO - Curr Opin Microbiol VL - 21 N2 - In recent decades, there has been growing interest in the field of gasotransmitters, endogenous gaseous signaling molecules (NO, H2S, and CO), as regulators of a multitude of biochemical pathways and physiological processes. Most of the concerted effort has been on eukaryotic gasotransmitters until the subsequent discovery of bacterial counterparts. While the fundamental aspects of bacterial gasotransmitters remain undefined and necessitate further research, we will discuss a known specific role they play in defense against antibiotics. Considering the current dilemma of multidrug-resistant bacteria we consider it particularly prudent to exploring novel targets and approaches, of which the bacterial gasotransmitters, nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide represent. SN - 1879-0364 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25078319/Bacterial_gasotransmitters:_an_innate_defense_against_antibiotics_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1369-5274(14)00087-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -