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Fetal growth in relation to gestational weight gain in women with type 2 diabetes: an observational study.
Diabet Med. 2014 Dec; 31(12):1681-9.DM

Abstract

AIMS

To evaluate fetal growth in relation to gestational weight gain in women with Type 2 diabetes.

METHODS

A retrospective cohort study of 142 consecutive pregnancies in 28 women of normal weight, 39 overweight women and 75 obese women with Type 2 diabetes (pre-pregnancy BMI < 25, 25-29.9, ≥ 30 kg/m2, respectively). Gestational weight gain was categorized as excessive (exceeding the US Institute of Medicine recommendations) or as non-excessive (within or below the Institute of Medicine recommendations).

RESULTS

Excessive and non-excessive gestational weight gain were seen in 61 (43%) and 81 women (57%) with a median (range) gestational weight gain of 14.3 (9-32) vs. 7.0 (-5-16) kg (P < 0.001), respectively. Infants of women with excessive gestational weight gain were characterized by higher birth weight (3712 vs. 3258 g; P = 0.001), birth weight z-score (1.14 vs. -0.01, P = 0.001) and prevalence of large-for-gestational-age infants (48 vs. 20%; P < 0.001). In normal weight, overweight and obese women with non-excessive gestational weight gain, the median weight gain in the first half of pregnancy was 371, 114 and 81 g/week, and in the second half of pregnancy 483, 427 and 439 g/week, respectively. In multiple linear regression analysis, gestational weight gain was associated with a higher infant birth weight z-score independent of pre-pregnancy BMI, smoking, HbA1c and insulin dose at last visit, ethnicity and parity [β=0.1 (95% CI 0.06-0.14), P < 0.001].

CONCLUSIONS

Infant birth weight was almost 0.5 kg higher in women with Type 2 diabetes and excessive gestational weight gain than in women with Type 2 diabetes and non-excessive weight gain.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Pregnant Women with Diabetes, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Endocrinology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Observational Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25081349

Citation

Parellada, C B., et al. "Fetal Growth in Relation to Gestational Weight Gain in Women With Type 2 Diabetes: an Observational Study." Diabetic Medicine : a Journal of the British Diabetic Association, vol. 31, no. 12, 2014, pp. 1681-9.
Parellada CB, Asbjörnsdóttir B, Ringholm L, et al. Fetal growth in relation to gestational weight gain in women with type 2 diabetes: an observational study. Diabet Med. 2014;31(12):1681-9.
Parellada, C. B., Asbjörnsdóttir, B., Ringholm, L., Damm, P., & Mathiesen, E. R. (2014). Fetal growth in relation to gestational weight gain in women with type 2 diabetes: an observational study. Diabetic Medicine : a Journal of the British Diabetic Association, 31(12), 1681-9. https://doi.org/10.1111/dme.12558
Parellada CB, et al. Fetal Growth in Relation to Gestational Weight Gain in Women With Type 2 Diabetes: an Observational Study. Diabet Med. 2014;31(12):1681-9. PubMed PMID: 25081349.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fetal growth in relation to gestational weight gain in women with type 2 diabetes: an observational study. AU - Parellada,C B, AU - Asbjörnsdóttir,B, AU - Ringholm,L, AU - Damm,P, AU - Mathiesen,E R, Y1 - 2014/08/26/ PY - 2014/07/30/accepted PY - 2014/8/2/entrez PY - 2014/8/2/pubmed PY - 2015/7/15/medline SP - 1681 EP - 9 JF - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association JO - Diabet. Med. VL - 31 IS - 12 N2 - AIMS: To evaluate fetal growth in relation to gestational weight gain in women with Type 2 diabetes. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study of 142 consecutive pregnancies in 28 women of normal weight, 39 overweight women and 75 obese women with Type 2 diabetes (pre-pregnancy BMI < 25, 25-29.9, ≥ 30 kg/m2, respectively). Gestational weight gain was categorized as excessive (exceeding the US Institute of Medicine recommendations) or as non-excessive (within or below the Institute of Medicine recommendations). RESULTS: Excessive and non-excessive gestational weight gain were seen in 61 (43%) and 81 women (57%) with a median (range) gestational weight gain of 14.3 (9-32) vs. 7.0 (-5-16) kg (P < 0.001), respectively. Infants of women with excessive gestational weight gain were characterized by higher birth weight (3712 vs. 3258 g; P = 0.001), birth weight z-score (1.14 vs. -0.01, P = 0.001) and prevalence of large-for-gestational-age infants (48 vs. 20%; P < 0.001). In normal weight, overweight and obese women with non-excessive gestational weight gain, the median weight gain in the first half of pregnancy was 371, 114 and 81 g/week, and in the second half of pregnancy 483, 427 and 439 g/week, respectively. In multiple linear regression analysis, gestational weight gain was associated with a higher infant birth weight z-score independent of pre-pregnancy BMI, smoking, HbA1c and insulin dose at last visit, ethnicity and parity [β=0.1 (95% CI 0.06-0.14), P < 0.001]. CONCLUSIONS: Infant birth weight was almost 0.5 kg higher in women with Type 2 diabetes and excessive gestational weight gain than in women with Type 2 diabetes and non-excessive weight gain. SN - 1464-5491 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25081349/Fetal_growth_in_relation_to_gestational_weight_gain_in_women_with_type_2_diabetes:_an_observational_study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/dme.12558 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -