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Microbiota-host interactions in irritable bowel syndrome: epithelial barrier, immune regulation and brain-gut interactions.
World J Gastroenterol. 2014 Jul 21; 20(27):8859-66.WJ

Abstract

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common, sometimes debilitating, gastrointestinal disorder worldwide. While altered gut motility and sensation, as well as aberrant brain perception of visceral events, are thought to contribute to the genesis of symptoms in IBS, a search for an underlying aetiology has, to date, proven unsuccessful. Recently, attention has been focused on the microbiota as a possible factor in the pathogenesis of IBS. Prompted by a number of clinical observations, such as the recognition of the de novo development of IBS following enteric infections, as well as descriptions of changes in colonic bacterial populations in IBS and supported by clinical responses to interventions, such as antibiotics and probiotics, that modify the microbiota, various approaches have been taken to investigating the microbiota-host response in IBS, as well as in animal models thereof. From such studies a considerable body of evidence has accumulated to indicate the activation or upregulation of both factors involved in bacterial engagement with the host as well host defence mechanisms against bacteria. Alterations in gut barrier function, occurring in response, or in parallel, to changes in the microbiota, have also been widely described and can be seen to play a pivotal role in generating and sustaining host immune responses both within and beyond the gut. In this manner a plausible hypothesis, based on an altered microbiota and/or an aberrant host response, for the pathogenesis, of at least some instances of IBS, can be generated.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Niall P Hyland, Eamonn MM Quigley, Elizabeth Brint, Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, University College Cork, 30 Cork, Ireland.Niall P Hyland, Eamonn MM Quigley, Elizabeth Brint, Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, University College Cork, 30 Cork, Ireland.Niall P Hyland, Eamonn MM Quigley, Elizabeth Brint, Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, University College Cork, 30 Cork, Ireland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25083059

Citation

Hyland, Niall P., et al. "Microbiota-host Interactions in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Epithelial Barrier, Immune Regulation and Brain-gut Interactions." World Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 20, no. 27, 2014, pp. 8859-66.
Hyland NP, Quigley EM, Brint E. Microbiota-host interactions in irritable bowel syndrome: epithelial barrier, immune regulation and brain-gut interactions. World J Gastroenterol. 2014;20(27):8859-66.
Hyland, N. P., Quigley, E. M., & Brint, E. (2014). Microbiota-host interactions in irritable bowel syndrome: epithelial barrier, immune regulation and brain-gut interactions. World Journal of Gastroenterology, 20(27), 8859-66. https://doi.org/10.3748/wjg.v20.i27.8859
Hyland NP, Quigley EM, Brint E. Microbiota-host Interactions in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Epithelial Barrier, Immune Regulation and Brain-gut Interactions. World J Gastroenterol. 2014 Jul 21;20(27):8859-66. PubMed PMID: 25083059.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Microbiota-host interactions in irritable bowel syndrome: epithelial barrier, immune regulation and brain-gut interactions. AU - Hyland,Niall P, AU - Quigley,Eamonn M M, AU - Brint,Elizabeth, PY - 2013/11/27/received PY - 2014/03/19/revised PY - 2014/05/12/accepted PY - 2014/8/2/entrez PY - 2014/8/2/pubmed PY - 2015/4/18/medline KW - Epithelial barrier KW - Gut-brain axis KW - Irritable bowel syndrome KW - Microbiota KW - Toll-like receptor SP - 8859 EP - 66 JF - World journal of gastroenterology JO - World J Gastroenterol VL - 20 IS - 27 N2 - Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common, sometimes debilitating, gastrointestinal disorder worldwide. While altered gut motility and sensation, as well as aberrant brain perception of visceral events, are thought to contribute to the genesis of symptoms in IBS, a search for an underlying aetiology has, to date, proven unsuccessful. Recently, attention has been focused on the microbiota as a possible factor in the pathogenesis of IBS. Prompted by a number of clinical observations, such as the recognition of the de novo development of IBS following enteric infections, as well as descriptions of changes in colonic bacterial populations in IBS and supported by clinical responses to interventions, such as antibiotics and probiotics, that modify the microbiota, various approaches have been taken to investigating the microbiota-host response in IBS, as well as in animal models thereof. From such studies a considerable body of evidence has accumulated to indicate the activation or upregulation of both factors involved in bacterial engagement with the host as well host defence mechanisms against bacteria. Alterations in gut barrier function, occurring in response, or in parallel, to changes in the microbiota, have also been widely described and can be seen to play a pivotal role in generating and sustaining host immune responses both within and beyond the gut. In this manner a plausible hypothesis, based on an altered microbiota and/or an aberrant host response, for the pathogenesis, of at least some instances of IBS, can be generated. SN - 2219-2840 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25083059/Microbiota_host_interactions_in_irritable_bowel_syndrome:_epithelial_barrier_immune_regulation_and_brain_gut_interactions_ L2 - https://www.wjgnet.com/1007-9327/full/v20/i27/8859.htm DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -