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Intestinal microbiota in pathophysiology and management of irritable bowel syndrome.
World J Gastroenterol. 2014 Jul 21; 20(27):8886-97.WJ

Abstract

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder without any structural or metabolic abnormalities that sufficiently explain the symptoms, which include abdominal pain and discomfort, and bowel habit changes such as diarrhea and constipation. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial: visceral hypersensitivity, dysmotility, psychosocial factors, genetic or environmental factors, dysregulation of the brain-gut axis, and altered intestinal microbiota have all been proposed as possible causes. The human intestinal microbiota are composed of more than 1000 different bacterial species and 10(14) cells, and are essential for the development, function, and homeostasis of the intestine, and for individual health. The putative mechanisms that explain the role of microbiota in the development of IBS include altered composition or metabolic activity of the microbiota, mucosal immune activation and inflammation, increased intestinal permeability and impaired mucosal barrier function, sensory-motor disturbances provoked by the microbiota, and a disturbed gut-microbiota-brain axis. Therefore, modulation of the intestinal microbiota through dietary changes, and use of antibiotics, probiotics, and anti-inflammatory agents has been suggested as strategies for managing IBS symptoms. This review summarizes and discusses the accumulating evidence that intestinal microbiota play a role in the pathophysiology and management of IBS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Kang Nyeong Lee, Oh Young Lee, Department of Internal Medicine, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul 133-791, South Korea.Kang Nyeong Lee, Oh Young Lee, Department of Internal Medicine, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul 133-791, South Korea.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25083061

Citation

Lee, Kang Nyeong, and Oh Young Lee. "Intestinal Microbiota in Pathophysiology and Management of Irritable Bowel Syndrome." World Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 20, no. 27, 2014, pp. 8886-97.
Lee KN, Lee OY. Intestinal microbiota in pathophysiology and management of irritable bowel syndrome. World J Gastroenterol. 2014;20(27):8886-97.
Lee, K. N., & Lee, O. Y. (2014). Intestinal microbiota in pathophysiology and management of irritable bowel syndrome. World Journal of Gastroenterology, 20(27), 8886-97. https://doi.org/10.3748/wjg.v20.i27.8886
Lee KN, Lee OY. Intestinal Microbiota in Pathophysiology and Management of Irritable Bowel Syndrome. World J Gastroenterol. 2014 Jul 21;20(27):8886-97. PubMed PMID: 25083061.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intestinal microbiota in pathophysiology and management of irritable bowel syndrome. AU - Lee,Kang Nyeong, AU - Lee,Oh Young, PY - 2014/02/09/received PY - 2014/04/02/revised PY - 2014/06/14/accepted PY - 2014/8/2/entrez PY - 2014/8/2/pubmed PY - 2015/4/18/medline KW - Immunity KW - Irritable bowel syndrome KW - Microbiota KW - Permeability KW - Probiotics SP - 8886 EP - 97 JF - World journal of gastroenterology JO - World J Gastroenterol VL - 20 IS - 27 N2 - Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder without any structural or metabolic abnormalities that sufficiently explain the symptoms, which include abdominal pain and discomfort, and bowel habit changes such as diarrhea and constipation. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial: visceral hypersensitivity, dysmotility, psychosocial factors, genetic or environmental factors, dysregulation of the brain-gut axis, and altered intestinal microbiota have all been proposed as possible causes. The human intestinal microbiota are composed of more than 1000 different bacterial species and 10(14) cells, and are essential for the development, function, and homeostasis of the intestine, and for individual health. The putative mechanisms that explain the role of microbiota in the development of IBS include altered composition or metabolic activity of the microbiota, mucosal immune activation and inflammation, increased intestinal permeability and impaired mucosal barrier function, sensory-motor disturbances provoked by the microbiota, and a disturbed gut-microbiota-brain axis. Therefore, modulation of the intestinal microbiota through dietary changes, and use of antibiotics, probiotics, and anti-inflammatory agents has been suggested as strategies for managing IBS symptoms. This review summarizes and discusses the accumulating evidence that intestinal microbiota play a role in the pathophysiology and management of IBS. SN - 2219-2840 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25083061/Intestinal_microbiota_in_pathophysiology_and_management_of_irritable_bowel_syndrome_ L2 - https://www.wjgnet.com/1007-9327/full/v20/i27/8886.htm DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -