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Age effects on the default mode and control networks in typically developing children.
J Psychiatr Res 2014; 58:89-95JP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The investigation of neurodevelopment during late childhood and pre-adolescence has recently attracted a great deal of interest in the field of neuroimaging. One promising topic in this field is the formation of brain networks in healthy subjects. The integration between neural modules characterizes the ability of the network to process information globally. Although many fMRI-based neurodevelopment studies can be found in the literature, the analyses of very large samples (on the order of hundreds of subjects) that focus on the late childhood/pre-adolescence period and resting state fMRI are scarce, and most studies have focused solely on North American and European populations.

AIMS

In this study, we present a descriptive investigation of the developmental formation of the Default Mode Network and the Control Network based on a Brazilian, cross-sectional community sample of 447 typically developing subjects aged 7-15 years old.

METHODS

Resting state fMRI data were acquired using two MRI systems from the same manufacturer using the same acquisition parameters. We estimated the age effects on the strength of the links (between brain regions) and the network features (graph descriptors: degree and eigenvector centrality).

RESULTS

Our findings showed an increase in the antero-posterior connectivity in both studied networks during brain development. The graph analyses showed an increase in centrality with age for most regions in the Default Mode Network and the dorsal anterior and posterior cingulate, the right anterior insula and the left posterior temporal cortex in the Control Network.

CONCLUSION

We conclude that the period of 7-15 years of age is crucial for the development of both the Default Mode and Control networks, with integration between the posterior and anterior neuronal modules and an increase in the centrality measures of the hub regions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center of Mathematics, Computation and Cognition, Universidade Federal do ABC, Santo Andre, Brazil; Interdisciplinary Lab for Clinical Neurosciences (LiNC), Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, Brazil; National Institute of Developmental Psychiatry for Children and Adolescents, CNPq, Brazil. Electronic address: joao.sato@ufabc.edu.br.Department of Psychiatry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil; National Institute of Developmental Psychiatry for Children and Adolescents, CNPq, Brazil.Interdisciplinary Lab for Clinical Neurosciences (LiNC), Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, Brazil; National Institute of Developmental Psychiatry for Children and Adolescents, CNPq, Brazil.Department of Psychiatry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil; National Institute of Developmental Psychiatry for Children and Adolescents, CNPq, Brazil.Interdisciplinary Lab for Clinical Neurosciences (LiNC), Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, Brazil; National Institute of Developmental Psychiatry for Children and Adolescents, CNPq, Brazil.Bioinformatics Program, Institute of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sao Paulo, Brazil; Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo, Brazil.Interdisciplinary Lab for Clinical Neurosciences (LiNC), Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, Brazil; National Institute of Developmental Psychiatry for Children and Adolescents, CNPq, Brazil.Interdisciplinary Lab for Clinical Neurosciences (LiNC), Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, Brazil; Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo, Brazil; National Institute of Developmental Psychiatry for Children and Adolescents, CNPq, Brazil.Department of Psychiatry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil; National Institute of Developmental Psychiatry for Children and Adolescents, CNPq, Brazil.Interdisciplinary Lab for Clinical Neurosciences (LiNC), Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, Brazil; National Institute of Developmental Psychiatry for Children and Adolescents, CNPq, Brazil.Interdisciplinary Lab for Clinical Neurosciences (LiNC), Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, Brazil; National Institute of Developmental Psychiatry for Children and Adolescents, CNPq, Brazil.Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo, Brazil.Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, United Kingdom.Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, United Kingdom.Interdisciplinary Lab for Clinical Neurosciences (LiNC), Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, Brazil; National Institute of Developmental Psychiatry for Children and Adolescents, CNPq, Brazil.Department of Psychiatry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil; National Institute of Developmental Psychiatry for Children and Adolescents, CNPq, Brazil.Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo, Brazil; National Institute of Developmental Psychiatry for Children and Adolescents, CNPq, Brazil.Interdisciplinary Lab for Clinical Neurosciences (LiNC), Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, Brazil; National Institute of Developmental Psychiatry for Children and Adolescents, CNPq, Brazil.Interdisciplinary Lab for Clinical Neurosciences (LiNC), Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, Brazil; National Institute of Developmental Psychiatry for Children and Adolescents, CNPq, Brazil.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25085608

Citation

Sato, João Ricardo, et al. "Age Effects On the Default Mode and Control Networks in Typically Developing Children." Journal of Psychiatric Research, vol. 58, 2014, pp. 89-95.
Sato JR, Salum GA, Gadelha A, et al. Age effects on the default mode and control networks in typically developing children. J Psychiatr Res. 2014;58:89-95.
Sato, J. R., Salum, G. A., Gadelha, A., Picon, F. A., Pan, P. M., Vieira, G., ... Jackowski, A. P. (2014). Age effects on the default mode and control networks in typically developing children. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 58, pp. 89-95. doi:10.1016/j.jpsychires.2014.07.004.
Sato JR, et al. Age Effects On the Default Mode and Control Networks in Typically Developing Children. J Psychiatr Res. 2014;58:89-95. PubMed PMID: 25085608.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Age effects on the default mode and control networks in typically developing children. AU - Sato,João Ricardo, AU - Salum,Giovanni Abrahão, AU - Gadelha,Ary, AU - Picon,Felipe Almeida, AU - Pan,Pedro Mario, AU - Vieira,Gilson, AU - Zugman,André, AU - Hoexter,Marcelo Queiroz, AU - Anés,Mauricio, AU - Moura,Luciana Monteiro, AU - Gomes Del'Aquilla,Marco Antonio, AU - Amaro,Edson,Jr AU - McGuire,Philip, AU - Crossley,Nicolas, AU - Lacerda,Acioly, AU - Rohde,Luis Augusto, AU - Miguel,Euripedes Constantino, AU - Bressan,Rodrigo Affonseca, AU - Jackowski,Andrea Parolin, Y1 - 2014/07/18/ PY - 2014/04/08/received PY - 2014/06/30/revised PY - 2014/07/03/accepted PY - 2014/8/3/entrez PY - 2014/8/3/pubmed PY - 2015/11/4/medline KW - Brain networks KW - Graph theory KW - Healthy KW - Neurodevelopment KW - Neuroimaging KW - Typical development SP - 89 EP - 95 JF - Journal of psychiatric research JO - J Psychiatr Res VL - 58 N2 - BACKGROUND: The investigation of neurodevelopment during late childhood and pre-adolescence has recently attracted a great deal of interest in the field of neuroimaging. One promising topic in this field is the formation of brain networks in healthy subjects. The integration between neural modules characterizes the ability of the network to process information globally. Although many fMRI-based neurodevelopment studies can be found in the literature, the analyses of very large samples (on the order of hundreds of subjects) that focus on the late childhood/pre-adolescence period and resting state fMRI are scarce, and most studies have focused solely on North American and European populations. AIMS: In this study, we present a descriptive investigation of the developmental formation of the Default Mode Network and the Control Network based on a Brazilian, cross-sectional community sample of 447 typically developing subjects aged 7-15 years old. METHODS: Resting state fMRI data were acquired using two MRI systems from the same manufacturer using the same acquisition parameters. We estimated the age effects on the strength of the links (between brain regions) and the network features (graph descriptors: degree and eigenvector centrality). RESULTS: Our findings showed an increase in the antero-posterior connectivity in both studied networks during brain development. The graph analyses showed an increase in centrality with age for most regions in the Default Mode Network and the dorsal anterior and posterior cingulate, the right anterior insula and the left posterior temporal cortex in the Control Network. CONCLUSION: We conclude that the period of 7-15 years of age is crucial for the development of both the Default Mode and Control networks, with integration between the posterior and anterior neuronal modules and an increase in the centrality measures of the hub regions. SN - 1879-1379 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25085608/Age_effects_on_the_default_mode_and_control_networks_in_typically_developing_children_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-3956(14)00201-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -