Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Nocturnal enuresis: an approach to assessment and treatment.
Pediatr Rev. 2014 Aug; 35(8):327-34; quiz 335.PR

Abstract

On the basis of strong evidence, although primary monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis (PMNE) is common and most children will outgrow the condition spontaneously, the psychological effect to the child can be significant and represents the main reason for treatment of these children. On the basis of international consensus panels, treatment of PMNE should be targeted toward the specific type of bedwetting patterns the child has, using bladder diary, sleep history, and daytime elimination concerns as a guide (Table 3). On the basis of international consensus panels, it is important for the primary care physician to be able to differentiate children with PMNE from children with nonmonosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis (NMNE) and secondary nocturnal enuresis. On the basis of international consensus panels, children with NMNE should have their underlying voiding or stool problem addressed before initiation of therapy for the nocturnal enuresis. On the basis of strong evidence, both the bedwetting alarm and desmopressin are considered first-line therapy for children with PMNE.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Pediatric Urology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR.Pediatric Urology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25086164

Citation

Bayne, Aaron P., and Steven J. Skoog. "Nocturnal Enuresis: an Approach to Assessment and Treatment." Pediatrics in Review, vol. 35, no. 8, 2014, pp. 327-34; quiz 335.
Bayne AP, Skoog SJ. Nocturnal enuresis: an approach to assessment and treatment. Pediatr Rev. 2014;35(8):327-34; quiz 335.
Bayne, A. P., & Skoog, S. J. (2014). Nocturnal enuresis: an approach to assessment and treatment. Pediatrics in Review, 35(8), 327-34; quiz 335. https://doi.org/10.1542/pir.35-8-327
Bayne AP, Skoog SJ. Nocturnal Enuresis: an Approach to Assessment and Treatment. Pediatr Rev. 2014;35(8):327-34; quiz 335. PubMed PMID: 25086164.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Nocturnal enuresis: an approach to assessment and treatment. AU - Bayne,Aaron P, AU - Skoog,Steven J, PY - 2014/8/3/entrez PY - 2014/8/3/pubmed PY - 2015/10/7/medline SP - 327-34; quiz 335 JF - Pediatrics in review JO - Pediatr Rev VL - 35 IS - 8 N2 - On the basis of strong evidence, although primary monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis (PMNE) is common and most children will outgrow the condition spontaneously, the psychological effect to the child can be significant and represents the main reason for treatment of these children. On the basis of international consensus panels, treatment of PMNE should be targeted toward the specific type of bedwetting patterns the child has, using bladder diary, sleep history, and daytime elimination concerns as a guide (Table 3). On the basis of international consensus panels, it is important for the primary care physician to be able to differentiate children with PMNE from children with nonmonosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis (NMNE) and secondary nocturnal enuresis. On the basis of international consensus panels, children with NMNE should have their underlying voiding or stool problem addressed before initiation of therapy for the nocturnal enuresis. On the basis of strong evidence, both the bedwetting alarm and desmopressin are considered first-line therapy for children with PMNE. SN - 1526-3347 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25086164/Nocturnal_enuresis:_an_approach_to_assessment_and_treatment_ L2 - http://pedsinreview.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=25086164 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -