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Microbiological profile of bacterial pathogens from diabetic foot infections in tertiary care hospitals, Salem.
Diabetes Metab Syndr. 2014 Jul-Sep; 8(3):129-32.DM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Worldwide, diabetic foot infections are one of the most serious complications resulting in long term hospitalization among the diabetic patients.

AIM

The aim of this study was to determine the microbial profile and the antibiogram pattern of the patients with diabetic foot infections.

METHODS

Pus samples were taken from 50 patients presenting with diabetic foot infections over a period of 10 months. The samples were processed by standard microbiological methods.

RESULTS

A total of 51 bacterial isolates were obtained from 50 patients with diabetic foot infections. The age group of these patients ranged from 30 to 80 years and the maximum number of patients were in the age group of 51-60 years. Gram negative (51%) were more prevalent than Gram positive (49%) organisms in this study. The commonest isolate was Staphylococcus aureus (41%) followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (35%), Enterococcus spp., (4%), Escherichia coli, (4%), Salmonella spp., (4%), Bacillus spp., (4%), Micrococcus spp., (2%), Listeria spp., (2%), Shigella spp., (2%) and Proteus spp., (2%). The antibiotic sensitivity pattern showed Meropenem, Piperacillin, Cefoperazone/Sulbactam, Piperacillin/Tazobactam and Amikacin as the most effective antimicrobial agents for the gram positive and Gram negative bacterial species. In this study, 8(44%) isolates of Gram negative bacilli were ESBL producers and 4 (19%) isolates were MRSA strains.

CONCLUSION

The results of the study indicate that effective planning of therapy is very essential for the prevention of drug resistant organisms.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Medical Microbiology Laboratory, Department of Microbiology, Periyar University, Salem 636 011, Tamil Nadu, India.Medical Microbiology Laboratory, Department of Microbiology, Periyar University, Salem 636 011, Tamil Nadu, India. Electronic address: medicalmicro2012@gmail.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25087885

Citation

Sugandhi, P, and D Arvind Prasanth. "Microbiological Profile of Bacterial Pathogens From Diabetic Foot Infections in Tertiary Care Hospitals, Salem." Diabetes & Metabolic Syndrome, vol. 8, no. 3, 2014, pp. 129-32.
Sugandhi P, Prasanth DA. Microbiological profile of bacterial pathogens from diabetic foot infections in tertiary care hospitals, Salem. Diabetes Metab Syndr. 2014;8(3):129-32.
Sugandhi, P., & Prasanth, D. A. (2014). Microbiological profile of bacterial pathogens from diabetic foot infections in tertiary care hospitals, Salem. Diabetes & Metabolic Syndrome, 8(3), 129-32. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dsx.2014.07.004
Sugandhi P, Prasanth DA. Microbiological Profile of Bacterial Pathogens From Diabetic Foot Infections in Tertiary Care Hospitals, Salem. Diabetes Metab Syndr. 2014 Jul-Sep;8(3):129-32. PubMed PMID: 25087885.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Microbiological profile of bacterial pathogens from diabetic foot infections in tertiary care hospitals, Salem. AU - Sugandhi,P, AU - Prasanth,D Arvind, Y1 - 2014/07/31/ PY - 2014/8/5/entrez PY - 2014/8/5/pubmed PY - 2015/6/16/medline KW - Antimicrobial susceptibility KW - Bacterial profile KW - Diabetic foot ulcer KW - Staphylococcus aureus KW - Wagner's grade SP - 129 EP - 32 JF - Diabetes & metabolic syndrome JO - Diabetes Metab Syndr VL - 8 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Worldwide, diabetic foot infections are one of the most serious complications resulting in long term hospitalization among the diabetic patients. AIM: The aim of this study was to determine the microbial profile and the antibiogram pattern of the patients with diabetic foot infections. METHODS: Pus samples were taken from 50 patients presenting with diabetic foot infections over a period of 10 months. The samples were processed by standard microbiological methods. RESULTS: A total of 51 bacterial isolates were obtained from 50 patients with diabetic foot infections. The age group of these patients ranged from 30 to 80 years and the maximum number of patients were in the age group of 51-60 years. Gram negative (51%) were more prevalent than Gram positive (49%) organisms in this study. The commonest isolate was Staphylococcus aureus (41%) followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (35%), Enterococcus spp., (4%), Escherichia coli, (4%), Salmonella spp., (4%), Bacillus spp., (4%), Micrococcus spp., (2%), Listeria spp., (2%), Shigella spp., (2%) and Proteus spp., (2%). The antibiotic sensitivity pattern showed Meropenem, Piperacillin, Cefoperazone/Sulbactam, Piperacillin/Tazobactam and Amikacin as the most effective antimicrobial agents for the gram positive and Gram negative bacterial species. In this study, 8(44%) isolates of Gram negative bacilli were ESBL producers and 4 (19%) isolates were MRSA strains. CONCLUSION: The results of the study indicate that effective planning of therapy is very essential for the prevention of drug resistant organisms. SN - 1878-0334 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25087885/Microbiological_profile_of_bacterial_pathogens_from_diabetic_foot_infections_in_tertiary_care_hospitals_Salem_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1871-4021(14)00066-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -