Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Dental anxiety screening practices and self-reported training needs among Australian dentists.
Aust Dent J. 2014 Dec; 59(4):464-72.AD

Abstract

BACKGROUND

It is recommended that dentists screen for dental anxiety (DA) so that fearful patients may be better managed. The main aim of this study was to determine what dentists are being taught in relation to DA as well as whether and how anxious patients are identified in the clinic.

METHODS

Two hundred and forty-six practising dentists (adjusted response rate = 40.1%), from a random sample of registered Australian dentists, completed a mailed questionnaire.

RESULTS

Dentists estimated that high DA affected 23.3% of children and 19.4% of adults seen. Only 3.7% of dentists reported using a published scale for screening DA, with the most common reason being lack of awareness (56.5%). Approximately one-half of responding dentists directly asked their patients about DA and this was more common among younger dentists (χ(2) = 7.75, p = 0.021). There were few differences in DA screening by other practitioner or practice characteristics (p > 0.05). Only one-third of dentists had received undergraduate training related to DA and only 41.7% considered this to be 'good' or better. Almost 37% of respondents expressed an interest in future training opportunities.

CONCLUSIONS

The use of formal, validated scales for screening DA is minimal. Training in anxiety management appears to be low and is an area that could be expanded upon.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Australian Research Centre for Population Oral Health, School of Dentistry, The University of Adelaide, South Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25091082

Citation

Armfield, J M., et al. "Dental Anxiety Screening Practices and Self-reported Training Needs Among Australian Dentists." Australian Dental Journal, vol. 59, no. 4, 2014, pp. 464-72.
Armfield JM, Mohan H, Luzzi L, et al. Dental anxiety screening practices and self-reported training needs among Australian dentists. Aust Dent J. 2014;59(4):464-72.
Armfield, J. M., Mohan, H., Luzzi, L., & Chrisopoulos, S. (2014). Dental anxiety screening practices and self-reported training needs among Australian dentists. Australian Dental Journal, 59(4), 464-72. https://doi.org/10.1111/adj.12211
Armfield JM, et al. Dental Anxiety Screening Practices and Self-reported Training Needs Among Australian Dentists. Aust Dent J. 2014;59(4):464-72. PubMed PMID: 25091082.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dental anxiety screening practices and self-reported training needs among Australian dentists. AU - Armfield,J M, AU - Mohan,H, AU - Luzzi,L, AU - Chrisopoulos,S, Y1 - 2014/09/17/ PY - 2014/01/29/accepted PY - 2014/8/6/entrez PY - 2014/8/6/pubmed PY - 2015/5/15/medline KW - Dental anxiety KW - education KW - fear KW - screening KW - training SP - 464 EP - 72 JF - Australian dental journal JO - Aust Dent J VL - 59 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: It is recommended that dentists screen for dental anxiety (DA) so that fearful patients may be better managed. The main aim of this study was to determine what dentists are being taught in relation to DA as well as whether and how anxious patients are identified in the clinic. METHODS: Two hundred and forty-six practising dentists (adjusted response rate = 40.1%), from a random sample of registered Australian dentists, completed a mailed questionnaire. RESULTS: Dentists estimated that high DA affected 23.3% of children and 19.4% of adults seen. Only 3.7% of dentists reported using a published scale for screening DA, with the most common reason being lack of awareness (56.5%). Approximately one-half of responding dentists directly asked their patients about DA and this was more common among younger dentists (χ(2) = 7.75, p = 0.021). There were few differences in DA screening by other practitioner or practice characteristics (p > 0.05). Only one-third of dentists had received undergraduate training related to DA and only 41.7% considered this to be 'good' or better. Almost 37% of respondents expressed an interest in future training opportunities. CONCLUSIONS: The use of formal, validated scales for screening DA is minimal. Training in anxiety management appears to be low and is an area that could be expanded upon. SN - 1834-7819 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25091082/Dental_anxiety_screening_practices_and_self_reported_training_needs_among_Australian_dentists_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -