Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Agent Orange exposure and cancer incidence in Korean Vietnam veterans: a prospective cohort study.
Cancer. 2014 Dec 01; 120(23):3699-706.C

Abstract

BACKGROUND

During the Vietnam War, US and allied military sprayed approximately 77 million liters of tactical herbicides including Agent Orange, contaminated with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin. To the authors' knowledge, few studies to date have examined the association between Agent Orange exposure and cancer incidence among Korean veterans who were exposed to Agent Orange during the Vietnam War.

METHODS

An Agent Orange exposure index, based on the proximity of the veteran's military unit to the area that was sprayed with Agent Orange, was developed using a geographic information system-based model. Cancer incidence was followed for 180,251 Vietnam veterans from 1992 through 2003.

RESULTS

After adjustment for age and military rank, high exposure to Agent Orange was found to significantly increase the risk of all cancers combined (adjusted hazards ratio [aHR], 1.08). Risks for cancers of the mouth (aHR, 2.54), salivary glands (aHR, 6.96), stomach (aHR, 1.14), and small intestine (aHR, 2.30) were found to be significantly higher in the high-exposure group compared with the low-exposure group. Risks for cancers of all sites combined (aHR, 1.02) and for cancers of the salivary glands (aHR, 1.47), stomach (aHR, 1.03), small intestine (aHR, 1.24), and liver (aHR, 1.02) were elevated with a 1-unit increase in the exposure index.

CONCLUSIONS

Exposure to Agent Orange several decades earlier may increase the risk of cancers in all sites combined, as well as several specific cancers, among Korean veterans of the Vietnam War, including some cancers that were not found to be clearly associated with exposure to Agent Orange in previous cohort studies primarily based on Western populations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Catholic Kwandong University College of Medicine, Gangneung, Gangwon-do, Republic of Korea.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25103108

Citation

Yi, Sang-Wook, and Heechoul Ohrr. "Agent Orange Exposure and Cancer Incidence in Korean Vietnam Veterans: a Prospective Cohort Study." Cancer, vol. 120, no. 23, 2014, pp. 3699-706.
Yi SW, Ohrr H. Agent Orange exposure and cancer incidence in Korean Vietnam veterans: a prospective cohort study. Cancer. 2014;120(23):3699-706.
Yi, S. W., & Ohrr, H. (2014). Agent Orange exposure and cancer incidence in Korean Vietnam veterans: a prospective cohort study. Cancer, 120(23), 3699-706. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.28961
Yi SW, Ohrr H. Agent Orange Exposure and Cancer Incidence in Korean Vietnam Veterans: a Prospective Cohort Study. Cancer. 2014 Dec 1;120(23):3699-706. PubMed PMID: 25103108.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Agent Orange exposure and cancer incidence in Korean Vietnam veterans: a prospective cohort study. AU - Yi,Sang-Wook, AU - Ohrr,Heechoul, Y1 - 2014/08/07/ PY - 2014/03/01/received PY - 2014/05/01/revised PY - 2014/05/21/accepted PY - 2014/8/9/entrez PY - 2014/8/12/pubmed PY - 2015/1/17/medline KW - Agent Orange KW - Korea KW - cancer KW - cohort studies KW - dioxins KW - herbicides KW - incidence KW - veterans SP - 3699 EP - 706 JF - Cancer JO - Cancer VL - 120 IS - 23 N2 - BACKGROUND: During the Vietnam War, US and allied military sprayed approximately 77 million liters of tactical herbicides including Agent Orange, contaminated with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin. To the authors' knowledge, few studies to date have examined the association between Agent Orange exposure and cancer incidence among Korean veterans who were exposed to Agent Orange during the Vietnam War. METHODS: An Agent Orange exposure index, based on the proximity of the veteran's military unit to the area that was sprayed with Agent Orange, was developed using a geographic information system-based model. Cancer incidence was followed for 180,251 Vietnam veterans from 1992 through 2003. RESULTS: After adjustment for age and military rank, high exposure to Agent Orange was found to significantly increase the risk of all cancers combined (adjusted hazards ratio [aHR], 1.08). Risks for cancers of the mouth (aHR, 2.54), salivary glands (aHR, 6.96), stomach (aHR, 1.14), and small intestine (aHR, 2.30) were found to be significantly higher in the high-exposure group compared with the low-exposure group. Risks for cancers of all sites combined (aHR, 1.02) and for cancers of the salivary glands (aHR, 1.47), stomach (aHR, 1.03), small intestine (aHR, 1.24), and liver (aHR, 1.02) were elevated with a 1-unit increase in the exposure index. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to Agent Orange several decades earlier may increase the risk of cancers in all sites combined, as well as several specific cancers, among Korean veterans of the Vietnam War, including some cancers that were not found to be clearly associated with exposure to Agent Orange in previous cohort studies primarily based on Western populations. SN - 1097-0142 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25103108/Agent_Orange_exposure_and_cancer_incidence_in_Korean_Vietnam_veterans:_a_prospective_cohort_study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.28961 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -