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Phytonutrient intakes in relation to European fruit and vegetable consumption patterns observed in different food surveys.
Br J Nutr 2014; 112(7):1214-25BJ

Abstract

Fruit and vegetables make an important contribution to health, partly due to the composition of phytonutrients, such as carotenoids and polyphenols. The aim of the present study was to quantify the intake of fruit and vegetables across different European countries using food consumption data of increasing complexity: food balance sheets (FBS); the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) Comprehensive Database; individual food consumption data from the UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS). Across Europe, the average consumption of fruit and vegetables ranged from 192 to 824 g/d (FBS data). Based on EFSA data, nine out of fourteen countries consumed < 400 g/d (recommended by the WHO), although even in the highest-consuming countries such as Spain, 36 % did not reach the target intake. In the UK, the average consumption of fruit and vegetables was 310 g/d (NDNS data). Generally, phytonutrient intake increased in accordance with fruit and vegetable intake across all European countries with the exception of lycopene (from tomatoes), which appeared to be higher in some countries that consumed less fruit and vegetables. There were little differences in the average intake of flavanols, flavonols and lycopene in those who did or did not meet the 400 g/d recommendation in the UK. However, average intakes of carotenoid, flavanone, anthocyanidin and ellagic acid were higher in those who consumed >400 g/d of fruit and vegetables compared with those who did not. Overall, intakes of phytonutrients are highly variable, suggesting that while some individuals obtain healthful amounts, there may be others who do not gain all the potential benefits associated with phytonutrients in the diet.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Food Chemical Risk Analysis,14 St Mary's Square,BrightonBN2 1FZ,UK.Amway (UK) Limited,St Anne's House, Caldecotte Lake Drive, Caldecotte Business Park, Caldecotte,Milton KeynesMK7 8JU,UK.School of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Leeds,LeedsLS2 9JT,UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25108299

Citation

Tennant, David R., et al. "Phytonutrient Intakes in Relation to European Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Patterns Observed in Different Food Surveys." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 112, no. 7, 2014, pp. 1214-25.
Tennant DR, Davidson J, Day AJ. Phytonutrient intakes in relation to European fruit and vegetable consumption patterns observed in different food surveys. Br J Nutr. 2014;112(7):1214-25.
Tennant, D. R., Davidson, J., & Day, A. J. (2014). Phytonutrient intakes in relation to European fruit and vegetable consumption patterns observed in different food surveys. The British Journal of Nutrition, 112(7), pp. 1214-25. doi:10.1017/S0007114514001950.
Tennant DR, Davidson J, Day AJ. Phytonutrient Intakes in Relation to European Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Patterns Observed in Different Food Surveys. Br J Nutr. 2014 Oct 14;112(7):1214-25. PubMed PMID: 25108299.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Phytonutrient intakes in relation to European fruit and vegetable consumption patterns observed in different food surveys. AU - Tennant,David R, AU - Davidson,Julia, AU - Day,Andrea J, Y1 - 2014/08/11/ PY - 2014/8/11/entrez PY - 2014/8/12/pubmed PY - 2014/12/15/medline SP - 1214 EP - 25 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br. J. Nutr. VL - 112 IS - 7 N2 - Fruit and vegetables make an important contribution to health, partly due to the composition of phytonutrients, such as carotenoids and polyphenols. The aim of the present study was to quantify the intake of fruit and vegetables across different European countries using food consumption data of increasing complexity: food balance sheets (FBS); the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) Comprehensive Database; individual food consumption data from the UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS). Across Europe, the average consumption of fruit and vegetables ranged from 192 to 824 g/d (FBS data). Based on EFSA data, nine out of fourteen countries consumed < 400 g/d (recommended by the WHO), although even in the highest-consuming countries such as Spain, 36 % did not reach the target intake. In the UK, the average consumption of fruit and vegetables was 310 g/d (NDNS data). Generally, phytonutrient intake increased in accordance with fruit and vegetable intake across all European countries with the exception of lycopene (from tomatoes), which appeared to be higher in some countries that consumed less fruit and vegetables. There were little differences in the average intake of flavanols, flavonols and lycopene in those who did or did not meet the 400 g/d recommendation in the UK. However, average intakes of carotenoid, flavanone, anthocyanidin and ellagic acid were higher in those who consumed >400 g/d of fruit and vegetables compared with those who did not. Overall, intakes of phytonutrients are highly variable, suggesting that while some individuals obtain healthful amounts, there may be others who do not gain all the potential benefits associated with phytonutrients in the diet. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25108299/Phytonutrient_intakes_in_relation_to_European_fruit_and_vegetable_consumption_patterns_observed_in_different_food_surveys_ L2 - http://journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S0007114514001950 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -