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Evaluation and diagnosis of the hair loss patient: part I. History and clinical examination.
J Am Acad Dermatol. 2014 Sep; 71(3):415.e1-415.e15.JA

Abstract

Hair loss (alopecia) is a common problem and is often a major source of distress for patients. The differential diagnosis of alopecia includes both scarring and nonscarring alopecias. In addition, many hair shaft disorders can produce hair shaft fragility, resulting in different patterns of alopecia. Therefore, an organized and systematic approach is needed to accurately address patients' complaints to achieve the correct diagnosis. Part 1 of this 2-part continuing medical education article on alopecia describes history taking and the clinical examination of different hair loss disorders. It also provides an algorithmic diagnostic approach based on the most recent knowledge about different types of alopecia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Al Imam Muhammad Ibn Saud Islamic University, Department of Dermatology, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland; Department of Neuropeptides, Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Warsaw, Poland.Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland.Department of Dermatology and Skin Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Department of Dermatology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, New York. Electronic address: jerry.shapiro@vch.ca.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25128118

Citation

Mubki, Thamer, et al. "Evaluation and Diagnosis of the Hair Loss Patient: Part I. History and Clinical Examination." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, vol. 71, no. 3, 2014, pp. 415.e1-415.e15.
Mubki T, Rudnicka L, Olszewska M, et al. Evaluation and diagnosis of the hair loss patient: part I. History and clinical examination. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2014;71(3):415.e1-415.e15.
Mubki, T., Rudnicka, L., Olszewska, M., & Shapiro, J. (2014). Evaluation and diagnosis of the hair loss patient: part I. History and clinical examination. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 71(3), e1-e15. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2014.04.070
Mubki T, et al. Evaluation and Diagnosis of the Hair Loss Patient: Part I. History and Clinical Examination. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2014;71(3):415.e1-415.e15. PubMed PMID: 25128118.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Evaluation and diagnosis of the hair loss patient: part I. History and clinical examination. AU - Mubki,Thamer, AU - Rudnicka,Lidia, AU - Olszewska,Malgorzata, AU - Shapiro,Jerry, PY - 2014/03/17/received PY - 2014/04/19/revised PY - 2014/04/24/accepted PY - 2014/8/17/entrez PY - 2014/8/17/pubmed PY - 2015/1/23/medline KW - alopecia areata KW - androgenetic alopecia KW - discoid lupus erythematosus KW - dissecting cellulitis KW - hair KW - lichen planopilaris KW - patterned hair loss KW - telogen effluvium KW - trichoscopy SP - 415.e1 EP - 415.e15 JF - Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology JO - J Am Acad Dermatol VL - 71 IS - 3 N2 - Hair loss (alopecia) is a common problem and is often a major source of distress for patients. The differential diagnosis of alopecia includes both scarring and nonscarring alopecias. In addition, many hair shaft disorders can produce hair shaft fragility, resulting in different patterns of alopecia. Therefore, an organized and systematic approach is needed to accurately address patients' complaints to achieve the correct diagnosis. Part 1 of this 2-part continuing medical education article on alopecia describes history taking and the clinical examination of different hair loss disorders. It also provides an algorithmic diagnostic approach based on the most recent knowledge about different types of alopecia. SN - 1097-6787 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25128118/Evaluation_and_diagnosis_of_the_hair_loss_patient:_part_I__History_and_clinical_examination_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -