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High prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency in adolescent inpatients diagnosed with eating disorders.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Previous studies assessing vitamin D status in adolescents with eating disorders showed inconsistent results. The aim of the current study was to assess vitamin D status in a large cohort of adolescent inpatients with eating disorders and its relation to bone mineral density (BMD) and depression.

METHOD

25-Hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD), calcium, phosphorus, and alkaline phosphatase levels as well as BMD and depression were assessed on admission in 87 inpatients (aged 16 ± 2 years, females = 81) with eating disorders [anorexia nervosa (AN) = 64; bulimia nervosa (BN) = 5; eating disorders not otherwise specified-binge/purge type (EDNOS-B/P) = 18].

RESULTS

Mean 25OHD levels were 24.1 ± 7.5 ng/ml (25.0 ± 7.6, 25.4 ± 9.9, and 22.0 ± 9.9 ng/ml in patients with AB, BN, and EDNOS-B/P, respectively). Vitamin D deficiency (<15 ng/ml) was found in 7.8% of the patients, and insufficiency (15-20 ng/ml) in 22.2%. Only 16.7% had levels >32 ng/ml, considered optimal by some experts. No associations were found between 25OHD levels and BMD or comorbid depression. 25OHD levels during winter were significantly lower than summer levels (p < .001). Mean lumbar spine BMD z-score in patients with AN and EDNOS-B/P type was low (-1.5 ± 1.1) and correlated with body mass index standard deviation score (p = .03).

DISCUSSION

Adolescents with eating disorders show a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency. Given the risk of osteoporosis in this population, 25OHD levels found in this group may not offer optimal bone protection. Vitamin D levels should be routinely checked and supplementation should be administered as required.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Pediatric Endcrinology Unit, The Edmond and Lily Safra Children's Hospital, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, Ramat-Gan, 52621, Israel. The Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, 69978, Israel.

    ,

    Pediatric Endcrinology Unit, The Edmond and Lily Safra Children's Hospital, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, Ramat-Gan, 52621, Israel. The Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, 69978, Israel.

    ,

    Pediatric Endcrinology Unit, The Edmond and Lily Safra Children's Hospital, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, Ramat-Gan, 52621, Israel. The Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, 69978, Israel.

    ,

    Pediatric Psychosomatic Department, The Edmond and Lily Safra Children's Hospital, The Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, Ramat Gan, 52621, Israel.

    ,

    Pediatric Psychosomatic Department, The Edmond and Lily Safra Children's Hospital, The Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, Ramat Gan, 52621, Israel.

    ,

    Institute of Endocrinology, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, Ramat-Gan, Israel.

    The Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, 69978, Israel. Pediatric Psychosomatic Department, The Edmond and Lily Safra Children's Hospital, The Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, Ramat Gan, 52621, Israel.

    Source

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Anorexia Nervosa
    Body Mass Index
    Cohort Studies
    Feeding and Eating Disorders
    Female
    Humans
    Inpatients
    Male
    Prevalence
    Vitamin D
    Vitamin D Deficiency

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    25130505

    Citation

    Modan-Moses, Dalit, et al. "High Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency and Insufficiency in Adolescent Inpatients Diagnosed With Eating Disorders." The International Journal of Eating Disorders, vol. 48, no. 6, 2015, pp. 607-14.
    Modan-Moses D, Levy-Shraga Y, Pinhas-Hamiel O, et al. High prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency in adolescent inpatients diagnosed with eating disorders. Int J Eat Disord. 2015;48(6):607-14.
    Modan-Moses, D., Levy-Shraga, Y., Pinhas-Hamiel, O., Kochavi, B., Enoch-Levy, A., Vered, I., & Stein, D. (2015). High prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency in adolescent inpatients diagnosed with eating disorders. The International Journal of Eating Disorders, 48(6), pp. 607-14. doi:10.1002/eat.22347.
    Modan-Moses D, et al. High Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency and Insufficiency in Adolescent Inpatients Diagnosed With Eating Disorders. Int J Eat Disord. 2015;48(6):607-14. PubMed PMID: 25130505.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - High prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency in adolescent inpatients diagnosed with eating disorders. AU - Modan-Moses,Dalit, AU - Levy-Shraga,Yael, AU - Pinhas-Hamiel,Orit, AU - Kochavi,Brigitte, AU - Enoch-Levy,Adi, AU - Vered,Iris, AU - Stein,Daniel, Y1 - 2014/08/18/ PY - 2014/04/23/received PY - 2014/07/23/revised PY - 2014/07/23/accepted PY - 2014/8/19/entrez PY - 2014/8/19/pubmed PY - 2016/3/8/medline KW - anorexia nervosa KW - bone density KW - depression KW - eating disorders KW - vitamin D SP - 607 EP - 14 JF - The International journal of eating disorders JO - Int J Eat Disord VL - 48 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Previous studies assessing vitamin D status in adolescents with eating disorders showed inconsistent results. The aim of the current study was to assess vitamin D status in a large cohort of adolescent inpatients with eating disorders and its relation to bone mineral density (BMD) and depression. METHOD: 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD), calcium, phosphorus, and alkaline phosphatase levels as well as BMD and depression were assessed on admission in 87 inpatients (aged 16 ± 2 years, females = 81) with eating disorders [anorexia nervosa (AN) = 64; bulimia nervosa (BN) = 5; eating disorders not otherwise specified-binge/purge type (EDNOS-B/P) = 18]. RESULTS: Mean 25OHD levels were 24.1 ± 7.5 ng/ml (25.0 ± 7.6, 25.4 ± 9.9, and 22.0 ± 9.9 ng/ml in patients with AB, BN, and EDNOS-B/P, respectively). Vitamin D deficiency (<15 ng/ml) was found in 7.8% of the patients, and insufficiency (15-20 ng/ml) in 22.2%. Only 16.7% had levels >32 ng/ml, considered optimal by some experts. No associations were found between 25OHD levels and BMD or comorbid depression. 25OHD levels during winter were significantly lower than summer levels (p < .001). Mean lumbar spine BMD z-score in patients with AN and EDNOS-B/P type was low (-1.5 ± 1.1) and correlated with body mass index standard deviation score (p = .03). DISCUSSION: Adolescents with eating disorders show a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency. Given the risk of osteoporosis in this population, 25OHD levels found in this group may not offer optimal bone protection. Vitamin D levels should be routinely checked and supplementation should be administered as required. SN - 1098-108X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25130505/full_citation L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/eat.22347 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -