Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Consumption of highly processed snacks, sugar-sweetened beverages and child feeding practices in a rural area of Nicaragua.
Matern Child Nutr. 2016 Jan; 12(1):164-76.MC

Abstract

Appropriate feeding behaviours are important for child growth and development. In societies undergoing nutrition transition, new food items are introduced that may be unfavourable for child health. Set in rural Nicaragua, the aim of this study was to describe the infant and young child feeding (IYCF) practices as well as the consumption of highly processed snack foods (HP snacks) and sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs). All households with at least one child 0- to 35-month-old (n = 1371) were visited to collect information on current IYCF practices in the youngest child as well as consumption of SSBs and HP snacks. Breastfeeding was dominant (98%) among 0- to 1-month-olds and continued to be prevalent (60%) in the second year, while only 34% of the 0- to 5-month-olds were exclusively breastfed. Complementary feeding practices were deemed acceptable for only 59% of the 6- to 11-month-old infants, with low dietary diversity reported for 50% and inadequate meal frequency reported for 30%. Consumption of HP snacks and SSBs was frequent and started early; among 6- to 8-month-olds, 42% and 32% had consumed HP snacks and SSBs, respectively. The difference between the observed IYCF behaviours and World Health Organization recommendations raises concern of increased risk of infections and insufficient intake of micronutrients that may impair linear growth. The concurrent high consumption of SSBs and HP snacks may increase the risk of displacing the recommended feeding behaviours. To promote immediate and long-term health, growth and development, there is a need to both promote recommended IYCF practices as well as discourage unfavourable feeding behaviours.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.Asociación para el Desarrollo Económico y Social de El Espino (APRODESE), Chinandega, Nicaragua.Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25134722

Citation

Contreras, Mariela, et al. "Consumption of Highly Processed Snacks, Sugar-sweetened Beverages and Child Feeding Practices in a Rural Area of Nicaragua." Maternal & Child Nutrition, vol. 12, no. 1, 2016, pp. 164-76.
Contreras M, Zelaya Blandón E, Persson LÅ, et al. Consumption of highly processed snacks, sugar-sweetened beverages and child feeding practices in a rural area of Nicaragua. Matern Child Nutr. 2016;12(1):164-76.
Contreras, M., Zelaya Blandón, E., Persson, L. Å., & Ekström, E. C. (2016). Consumption of highly processed snacks, sugar-sweetened beverages and child feeding practices in a rural area of Nicaragua. Maternal & Child Nutrition, 12(1), 164-76. https://doi.org/10.1111/mcn.12144
Contreras M, et al. Consumption of Highly Processed Snacks, Sugar-sweetened Beverages and Child Feeding Practices in a Rural Area of Nicaragua. Matern Child Nutr. 2016;12(1):164-76. PubMed PMID: 25134722.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Consumption of highly processed snacks, sugar-sweetened beverages and child feeding practices in a rural area of Nicaragua. AU - Contreras,Mariela, AU - Zelaya Blandón,Elmer, AU - Persson,Lars-Åke, AU - Ekström,Eva-Charlotte, Y1 - 2014/08/19/ PY - 2014/8/20/entrez PY - 2014/8/20/pubmed PY - 2016/12/15/medline KW - Nicaragua KW - breastfeeding KW - complementary feeding KW - dietary diversity KW - meal frequency KW - snacking SP - 164 EP - 76 JF - Maternal & child nutrition JO - Matern Child Nutr VL - 12 IS - 1 N2 - Appropriate feeding behaviours are important for child growth and development. In societies undergoing nutrition transition, new food items are introduced that may be unfavourable for child health. Set in rural Nicaragua, the aim of this study was to describe the infant and young child feeding (IYCF) practices as well as the consumption of highly processed snack foods (HP snacks) and sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs). All households with at least one child 0- to 35-month-old (n = 1371) were visited to collect information on current IYCF practices in the youngest child as well as consumption of SSBs and HP snacks. Breastfeeding was dominant (98%) among 0- to 1-month-olds and continued to be prevalent (60%) in the second year, while only 34% of the 0- to 5-month-olds were exclusively breastfed. Complementary feeding practices were deemed acceptable for only 59% of the 6- to 11-month-old infants, with low dietary diversity reported for 50% and inadequate meal frequency reported for 30%. Consumption of HP snacks and SSBs was frequent and started early; among 6- to 8-month-olds, 42% and 32% had consumed HP snacks and SSBs, respectively. The difference between the observed IYCF behaviours and World Health Organization recommendations raises concern of increased risk of infections and insufficient intake of micronutrients that may impair linear growth. The concurrent high consumption of SSBs and HP snacks may increase the risk of displacing the recommended feeding behaviours. To promote immediate and long-term health, growth and development, there is a need to both promote recommended IYCF practices as well as discourage unfavourable feeding behaviours. SN - 1740-8709 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25134722/Consumption_of_highly_processed_snacks_sugar_sweetened_beverages_and_child_feeding_practices_in_a_rural_area_of_Nicaragua_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/mcn.12144 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -