Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

High-resolution imaging of photoreceptors in macular microholes.
Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2014 Aug 21; 55(9):5932-43.IO

Abstract

PURPOSE

To assess photoreceptor structure in macular microholes by using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO) and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and compare with visual acuity.

METHODS

Fourteen eyes from 12 patients with macular microholes underwent a full ophthalmologic examination and imaging with a fundus camera, SD-OCT, and an original prototype AO-SLO system at each visit.

RESULTS

All eyes had a cone outer segment tip line disruption and a normal retinal pigment epithelium line on SD-OCT images. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy revealed foveal cone disruption (13 eyes, round or oval; 1 eye, T-shaped) in all eyes. Cone disruption area (mean = 14,805 ± 9120 μm(2); range, 3495-35,901 μm(2)) positively correlated with logMAR visual acuity at the first visit (P = 0.015, rs = 0.679). During the follow-up period, cone disruption area increased in two eyes, was stable in seven eyes, and decreased in five eyes. At the last visit, cone disruption area (mean = 8717 ± 7432 μm(2); range, 0-25,746 μm(2)) also positively correlated with logMAR visual acuity (P = 0.035, rs = 0.610). In one patient with bilateral microholes and no apparent vitreous traction, lesion size gradually increased. Cone disruption area decreased and visual acuity improved following oral prednisone therapy.

CONCLUSIONS

Cone disruption occurs in eyes with macular microholes and a larger cone disruption area translates into a poorer visual acuity. Macular microholes, which are commonly observed as foveal cone inner and outer segment disruptions, may occur in eyes with or without vitreofoveal traction.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan.Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan.Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan.Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan.Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan.NIDEK Co., Ltd., Gamagori, Japan.Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25146990

Citation

Ooto, Sotaro, et al. "High-resolution Imaging of Photoreceptors in Macular Microholes." Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, vol. 55, no. 9, 2014, pp. 5932-43.
Ooto S, Hangai M, Takayama K, et al. High-resolution imaging of photoreceptors in macular microholes. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2014;55(9):5932-43.
Ooto, S., Hangai, M., Takayama, K., Ueda-Arakawa, N., Makiyama, Y., Hanebuchi, M., & Yoshimura, N. (2014). High-resolution imaging of photoreceptors in macular microholes. Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, 55(9), 5932-43. https://doi.org/10.1167/iovs.13-13792
Ooto S, et al. High-resolution Imaging of Photoreceptors in Macular Microholes. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2014 Aug 21;55(9):5932-43. PubMed PMID: 25146990.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - High-resolution imaging of photoreceptors in macular microholes. AU - Ooto,Sotaro, AU - Hangai,Masanori, AU - Takayama,Kohei, AU - Ueda-Arakawa,Naoko, AU - Makiyama,Yukiko, AU - Hanebuchi,Masaaki, AU - Yoshimura,Nagahisa, Y1 - 2014/08/21/ PY - 2014/8/23/entrez PY - 2014/8/26/pubmed PY - 2014/11/19/medline KW - adaptive optics KW - macular microhole KW - optical coherence tomography KW - scanning laser ophthalmoscopy SP - 5932 EP - 43 JF - Investigative ophthalmology & visual science JO - Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. VL - 55 IS - 9 N2 - PURPOSE: To assess photoreceptor structure in macular microholes by using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO) and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and compare with visual acuity. METHODS: Fourteen eyes from 12 patients with macular microholes underwent a full ophthalmologic examination and imaging with a fundus camera, SD-OCT, and an original prototype AO-SLO system at each visit. RESULTS: All eyes had a cone outer segment tip line disruption and a normal retinal pigment epithelium line on SD-OCT images. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy revealed foveal cone disruption (13 eyes, round or oval; 1 eye, T-shaped) in all eyes. Cone disruption area (mean = 14,805 ± 9120 μm(2); range, 3495-35,901 μm(2)) positively correlated with logMAR visual acuity at the first visit (P = 0.015, rs = 0.679). During the follow-up period, cone disruption area increased in two eyes, was stable in seven eyes, and decreased in five eyes. At the last visit, cone disruption area (mean = 8717 ± 7432 μm(2); range, 0-25,746 μm(2)) also positively correlated with logMAR visual acuity (P = 0.035, rs = 0.610). In one patient with bilateral microholes and no apparent vitreous traction, lesion size gradually increased. Cone disruption area decreased and visual acuity improved following oral prednisone therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Cone disruption occurs in eyes with macular microholes and a larger cone disruption area translates into a poorer visual acuity. Macular microholes, which are commonly observed as foveal cone inner and outer segment disruptions, may occur in eyes with or without vitreofoveal traction. SN - 1552-5783 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25146990/High_resolution_imaging_of_photoreceptors_in_macular_microholes_ L2 - http://iovs.arvojournals.org/article.aspx?doi=10.1167/iovs.13-13792 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -