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Musculoskeletal disorders among nurses compared with two other occupational groups.
Occup Med (Lond). 2014 Dec; 64(8):601-7.OM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

There is a high incidence of low back pain (LBP) among nurses. However, few longitudinal studies have investigated musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) at other anatomical sites in nurses.

AIMS

To describe the cumulative incidence and persistence/recurrence of MSDs of the low back, neck, shoulder, elbow, wrist/hand and knee among New Zealand nurses, to investigate the impact of MSDs on work and functional tasks and to compare findings for nurses with those in postal workers and office workers.

METHODS

Participants completed a postal survey at baseline and again 1 year later. Information was collected about MSDs in the previous 1 month and 12 months and about the ability to attend work, undertake work duties and perform functional tasks.

RESULTS

Among nurses, the low back was the site with the highest cumulative incidence and highest prevalence of persistent/recurrent, work-disabling and functional-task-disabling pain. Work-disabling LBP was more prevalent among nurses and postal workers than office workers (P < 0.001). Nurses had a substantial prevalence of work-disabling shoulder pain (10%) and functional-task-disabling knee (19%) and wrist/hand pain (16%). With the exception of the elbow, each occupational group had a high prevalence of persistent/recurrent MSDs at all anatomical sites.

CONCLUSIONS

LBP continues to have a substantial impact among nurses. Other less commonly considered MSDs, such as shoulder, wrist/hand and knee pain, also made work or functional tasks difficult, suggesting that primary and secondary prevention efforts should consider MSDs at other anatomical sites as well as the low back.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Musculoskeletal Outcomes Research, Department of Surgical Sciences, Dunedin School of Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand, Injury Prevention Research Unit, Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Dunedin School of Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand, helen.harcombe@otago.ac.nz.Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Dunedin School of Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand.Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Dunedin School of Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand.Injury Prevention Research Unit, Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Dunedin School of Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand, Health, Disability and Rehabilitation Studies, School of Health and Social Services, Massey University, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25149117

Citation

Harcombe, H, et al. "Musculoskeletal Disorders Among Nurses Compared With Two Other Occupational Groups." Occupational Medicine (Oxford, England), vol. 64, no. 8, 2014, pp. 601-7.
Harcombe H, Herbison GP, McBride D, et al. Musculoskeletal disorders among nurses compared with two other occupational groups. Occup Med (Lond). 2014;64(8):601-7.
Harcombe, H., Herbison, G. P., McBride, D., & Derrett, S. (2014). Musculoskeletal disorders among nurses compared with two other occupational groups. Occupational Medicine (Oxford, England), 64(8), 601-7. https://doi.org/10.1093/occmed/kqu117
Harcombe H, et al. Musculoskeletal Disorders Among Nurses Compared With Two Other Occupational Groups. Occup Med (Lond). 2014;64(8):601-7. PubMed PMID: 25149117.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Musculoskeletal disorders among nurses compared with two other occupational groups. AU - Harcombe,H, AU - Herbison,G P, AU - McBride,D, AU - Derrett,S, Y1 - 2014/08/22/ PY - 2014/8/24/entrez PY - 2014/8/26/pubmed PY - 2015/11/12/medline KW - Incidence KW - longitudinal studies KW - musculoskeletal pain KW - nurses KW - occupational disease KW - occupational exposure KW - office workers KW - pain KW - postal workers. SP - 601 EP - 7 JF - Occupational medicine (Oxford, England) JO - Occup Med (Lond) VL - 64 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: There is a high incidence of low back pain (LBP) among nurses. However, few longitudinal studies have investigated musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) at other anatomical sites in nurses. AIMS: To describe the cumulative incidence and persistence/recurrence of MSDs of the low back, neck, shoulder, elbow, wrist/hand and knee among New Zealand nurses, to investigate the impact of MSDs on work and functional tasks and to compare findings for nurses with those in postal workers and office workers. METHODS: Participants completed a postal survey at baseline and again 1 year later. Information was collected about MSDs in the previous 1 month and 12 months and about the ability to attend work, undertake work duties and perform functional tasks. RESULTS: Among nurses, the low back was the site with the highest cumulative incidence and highest prevalence of persistent/recurrent, work-disabling and functional-task-disabling pain. Work-disabling LBP was more prevalent among nurses and postal workers than office workers (P < 0.001). Nurses had a substantial prevalence of work-disabling shoulder pain (10%) and functional-task-disabling knee (19%) and wrist/hand pain (16%). With the exception of the elbow, each occupational group had a high prevalence of persistent/recurrent MSDs at all anatomical sites. CONCLUSIONS: LBP continues to have a substantial impact among nurses. Other less commonly considered MSDs, such as shoulder, wrist/hand and knee pain, also made work or functional tasks difficult, suggesting that primary and secondary prevention efforts should consider MSDs at other anatomical sites as well as the low back. SN - 1471-8405 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25149117/Musculoskeletal_disorders_among_nurses_compared_with_two_other_occupational_groups_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/occmed/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/occmed/kqu117 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -