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Endothelial dysfunction and hyperhomocysteinemia in Parkinson's disease: flow-mediated dilation study.
Mov Disord. 2014 Oct; 29(12):1551-5.MD

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Levodopa (l-dopa) therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD) increases serum homocysteine levels because of its metabolism via catechol O-methyltransferase, which may lead to endothelial dysfunction.

METHOD

We enrolled 40 PD patients treated with l-dopa, 33 PD patients treated with l-dopa/entacapone, 22 untreated PD and 30 controls, and compared the flow-mediated dilation in these subjects.

RESULTS

The flow-mediated dilation was significantly lower in PD patients with l-dopa (6.0 ± 1.8%) than in those with l-dopa/entacapone (7.2 ± 1.1%, P = 0.03), untreated PD patients (7.8 ± 1.2%, P < 0.05), and controls (8.5 ± 2.9%, P < 0.05). The homocysteine level was significantly higher in PD patients with l-dopa than in other groups. In a multivariate logistic regression model, the uppermost homocysteine quartile was an independent predictor of the lowest tertile of flow-mediated dilation (odds ratio, 6.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.61-26.65; P = 0.012).

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings indicate that endothelial dysfunction may be associated with chronic l-dopa treatment in patients with PD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, South Korea.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25154960

Citation

Yoon, Jung Han, et al. "Endothelial Dysfunction and Hyperhomocysteinemia in Parkinson's Disease: Flow-mediated Dilation Study." Movement Disorders : Official Journal of the Movement Disorder Society, vol. 29, no. 12, 2014, pp. 1551-5.
Yoon JH, Lee JS, Yong SW, et al. Endothelial dysfunction and hyperhomocysteinemia in Parkinson's disease: flow-mediated dilation study. Mov Disord. 2014;29(12):1551-5.
Yoon, J. H., Lee, J. S., Yong, S. W., Hong, J. M., & Lee, P. H. (2014). Endothelial dysfunction and hyperhomocysteinemia in Parkinson's disease: flow-mediated dilation study. Movement Disorders : Official Journal of the Movement Disorder Society, 29(12), 1551-5. https://doi.org/10.1002/mds.26005
Yoon JH, et al. Endothelial Dysfunction and Hyperhomocysteinemia in Parkinson's Disease: Flow-mediated Dilation Study. Mov Disord. 2014;29(12):1551-5. PubMed PMID: 25154960.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Endothelial dysfunction and hyperhomocysteinemia in Parkinson's disease: flow-mediated dilation study. AU - Yoon,Jung Han, AU - Lee,Jin Soo, AU - Yong,Seok Woo, AU - Hong,Ji Man, AU - Lee,Phil Hyu, Y1 - 2014/08/22/ PY - 2013/12/18/received PY - 2014/07/24/revised PY - 2014/07/30/accepted PY - 2014/8/27/entrez PY - 2014/8/27/pubmed PY - 2015/6/4/medline KW - Parkinson's disease KW - endothelial dysfunction KW - flow-mediated dilation KW - hyperhomocysteinemia SP - 1551 EP - 5 JF - Movement disorders : official journal of the Movement Disorder Society JO - Mov Disord VL - 29 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: Levodopa (l-dopa) therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD) increases serum homocysteine levels because of its metabolism via catechol O-methyltransferase, which may lead to endothelial dysfunction. METHOD: We enrolled 40 PD patients treated with l-dopa, 33 PD patients treated with l-dopa/entacapone, 22 untreated PD and 30 controls, and compared the flow-mediated dilation in these subjects. RESULTS: The flow-mediated dilation was significantly lower in PD patients with l-dopa (6.0 ± 1.8%) than in those with l-dopa/entacapone (7.2 ± 1.1%, P = 0.03), untreated PD patients (7.8 ± 1.2%, P < 0.05), and controls (8.5 ± 2.9%, P < 0.05). The homocysteine level was significantly higher in PD patients with l-dopa than in other groups. In a multivariate logistic regression model, the uppermost homocysteine quartile was an independent predictor of the lowest tertile of flow-mediated dilation (odds ratio, 6.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.61-26.65; P = 0.012). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that endothelial dysfunction may be associated with chronic l-dopa treatment in patients with PD. SN - 1531-8257 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25154960/Endothelial_dysfunction_and_hyperhomocysteinemia_in_Parkinson's_disease:_flow_mediated_dilation_study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/mds.26005 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -