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Disparity in diabetes risk across Native Hawaiians and different Asian groups: the multiethnic cohort.
Asia Pac J Public Health 2015; 27(4):375-84AP

Abstract

We evaluated the impact of body mass index (BMI) and lifestyle risk factors on ethnic disparity in diabetes incidence among 89 198 Asian, Native Hawaiian, and white participants of the Multiethnic Cohort who completed multiple questionnaires. After 12 years of follow-up, 11 218 new cases were identified through self-report and health plan linkages. BMI was lowest in Chinese/Koreans, Japanese, and Filipinos (22.4, 23.5, and 23.9 kg/m(2)). Using Cox regression, the unadjusted hazard ratios were 1.9 (Chinese/Korean), 2.1 (Japanese, Mixed-Asian), 2.2 (Filipino), 2.5 (Native Hawaiian), and 2.6 (part-Asian) as compared with whites. With BMI added, the risk for Japanese, Filipinos, Chinese/Koreans, and mixed-Asians increased (8%-42%) but declined in part-Asians and Native Hawaiians (17%-31%). When lifestyle and dietary factors were also included, the risk was attenuated in all groups (6%-14%). Despite their lower BMI, Asian Americans have a higher diabetes risk than whites, but dietary and lifestyle factors do not account for the excess risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI, USA gertraud@cc.hawaii.edu.German Institute of Human Nutrition, Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Germany.University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI, USA.University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI, USA.German Institute of Human Nutrition, Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Germany.Office of Public Health Studies, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25164594

Citation

Maskarinec, Gertraud, et al. "Disparity in Diabetes Risk Across Native Hawaiians and Different Asian Groups: the Multiethnic Cohort." Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health, vol. 27, no. 4, 2015, pp. 375-84.
Maskarinec G, Jacobs S, Morimoto Y, et al. Disparity in diabetes risk across Native Hawaiians and different Asian groups: the multiethnic cohort. Asia Pac J Public Health. 2015;27(4):375-84.
Maskarinec, G., Jacobs, S., Morimoto, Y., Chock, M., Grandinetti, A., & Kolonel, L. N. (2015). Disparity in diabetes risk across Native Hawaiians and different Asian groups: the multiethnic cohort. Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health, 27(4), pp. 375-84. doi:10.1177/1010539514548757.
Maskarinec G, et al. Disparity in Diabetes Risk Across Native Hawaiians and Different Asian Groups: the Multiethnic Cohort. Asia Pac J Public Health. 2015;27(4):375-84. PubMed PMID: 25164594.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Disparity in diabetes risk across Native Hawaiians and different Asian groups: the multiethnic cohort. AU - Maskarinec,Gertraud, AU - Jacobs,Simone, AU - Morimoto,Yukiko, AU - Chock,Marci, AU - Grandinetti,Andrew, AU - Kolonel,Laurence N, Y1 - 2014/08/27/ PY - 2014/8/29/entrez PY - 2014/8/29/pubmed PY - 2016/2/3/medline KW - Filipinos KW - Japanese KW - Native Hawaiians KW - disparity KW - ethnicity KW - incidence KW - risk factors KW - type 2 diabetes mellitus SP - 375 EP - 84 JF - Asia-Pacific journal of public health JO - Asia Pac J Public Health VL - 27 IS - 4 N2 - We evaluated the impact of body mass index (BMI) and lifestyle risk factors on ethnic disparity in diabetes incidence among 89 198 Asian, Native Hawaiian, and white participants of the Multiethnic Cohort who completed multiple questionnaires. After 12 years of follow-up, 11 218 new cases were identified through self-report and health plan linkages. BMI was lowest in Chinese/Koreans, Japanese, and Filipinos (22.4, 23.5, and 23.9 kg/m(2)). Using Cox regression, the unadjusted hazard ratios were 1.9 (Chinese/Korean), 2.1 (Japanese, Mixed-Asian), 2.2 (Filipino), 2.5 (Native Hawaiian), and 2.6 (part-Asian) as compared with whites. With BMI added, the risk for Japanese, Filipinos, Chinese/Koreans, and mixed-Asians increased (8%-42%) but declined in part-Asians and Native Hawaiians (17%-31%). When lifestyle and dietary factors were also included, the risk was attenuated in all groups (6%-14%). Despite their lower BMI, Asian Americans have a higher diabetes risk than whites, but dietary and lifestyle factors do not account for the excess risk. SN - 1941-2479 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25164594/Disparity_in_diabetes_risk_across_Native_Hawaiians_and_different_Asian_groups:_the_multiethnic_cohort_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1010539514548757?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -