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The use of environmental DNA in invasive species surveillance of the Great Lakes commercial bait trade.
Conserv Biol. 2015 Apr; 29(2):430-9.CB

Abstract

Over 180 non-native species have been introduced in the Laurentian Great Lakes region, many posing threats to native species and ecosystem functioning. One potential pathway for introductions is the commercial bait trade; unknowing or unconcerned anglers commonly release unused bait into aquatic systems. Previous surveillance efforts of this pathway relied on visual inspection of bait stocks in retail shops, which can be time and cost prohibitive and requires a trained individual that can rapidly and accurately identify cryptic species. Environmental DNA (eDNA) surveillance, a molecular tool that has been used for surveillance in aquatic environments, can be used to efficiently detect species at low abundances. We collected and analyzed 576 eDNA samples from 525 retail bait shops throughout the Laurentian Great Lake states. We used eDNA techniques to screen samples for multiple aquatic invasive species (AIS) that could be transported in the bait trade, including bighead (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis) and silver carp (H. molitrix), round goby (Neogobius melanostomus), tubenose goby (Proterorhinus marmoratus), Eurasian rudd (Scardinius erythrophthalmus), and goldfish (Carassius auratus). Twenty-seven samples were positive for at least one target species (4.7% of samples), and all target species were found at least once, except bighead carp. Despite current regulations, the bait trade remains a potential pathway for invasive species introductions in the Great Lakes region. Alterations to existing management strategies regarding the collection, transportation, and use of live bait are warranted, including new and updated regulations, to prevent future introductions of invasive species in the Great Lakes via the bait trade.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute for Great Lakes Research, Department of Biology, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI, 48858, U.S.A.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25169113

Citation

Nathan, Lucas R., et al. "The Use of Environmental DNA in Invasive Species Surveillance of the Great Lakes Commercial Bait Trade." Conservation Biology : the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology, vol. 29, no. 2, 2015, pp. 430-9.
Nathan LR, Jerde CL, Budny ML, et al. The use of environmental DNA in invasive species surveillance of the Great Lakes commercial bait trade. Conserv Biol. 2015;29(2):430-9.
Nathan, L. R., Jerde, C. L., Budny, M. L., & Mahon, A. R. (2015). The use of environmental DNA in invasive species surveillance of the Great Lakes commercial bait trade. Conservation Biology : the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology, 29(2), 430-9. https://doi.org/10.1111/cobi.12381
Nathan LR, et al. The Use of Environmental DNA in Invasive Species Surveillance of the Great Lakes Commercial Bait Trade. Conserv Biol. 2015;29(2):430-9. PubMed PMID: 25169113.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The use of environmental DNA in invasive species surveillance of the Great Lakes commercial bait trade. AU - Nathan,Lucas R, AU - Jerde,Christopher L, AU - Budny,Michelle L, AU - Mahon,Andrew R, Y1 - 2014/08/28/ PY - 2014/04/08/received PY - 2014/06/15/accepted PY - 2014/8/30/entrez PY - 2014/8/30/pubmed PY - 2016/1/20/medline KW - carnada viva KW - detección molecular KW - eADN KW - eDNA KW - especies no-nativas KW - live bait KW - management KW - manejo KW - molecular detection KW - monitoreo KW - monitoring KW - nonindigenous species SP - 430 EP - 9 JF - Conservation biology : the journal of the Society for Conservation Biology JO - Conserv. Biol. VL - 29 IS - 2 N2 - Over 180 non-native species have been introduced in the Laurentian Great Lakes region, many posing threats to native species and ecosystem functioning. One potential pathway for introductions is the commercial bait trade; unknowing or unconcerned anglers commonly release unused bait into aquatic systems. Previous surveillance efforts of this pathway relied on visual inspection of bait stocks in retail shops, which can be time and cost prohibitive and requires a trained individual that can rapidly and accurately identify cryptic species. Environmental DNA (eDNA) surveillance, a molecular tool that has been used for surveillance in aquatic environments, can be used to efficiently detect species at low abundances. We collected and analyzed 576 eDNA samples from 525 retail bait shops throughout the Laurentian Great Lake states. We used eDNA techniques to screen samples for multiple aquatic invasive species (AIS) that could be transported in the bait trade, including bighead (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis) and silver carp (H. molitrix), round goby (Neogobius melanostomus), tubenose goby (Proterorhinus marmoratus), Eurasian rudd (Scardinius erythrophthalmus), and goldfish (Carassius auratus). Twenty-seven samples were positive for at least one target species (4.7% of samples), and all target species were found at least once, except bighead carp. Despite current regulations, the bait trade remains a potential pathway for invasive species introductions in the Great Lakes region. Alterations to existing management strategies regarding the collection, transportation, and use of live bait are warranted, including new and updated regulations, to prevent future introductions of invasive species in the Great Lakes via the bait trade. SN - 1523-1739 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25169113/The_use_of_environmental_DNA_in_invasive_species_surveillance_of_the_Great_Lakes_commercial_bait_trade_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/cobi.12381 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -