Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Ambient air pollution exposure and incident adult asthma in a nationwide cohort of U.S. women.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2014 Oct 15; 190(8):914-21.AJ

Abstract

RATIONALE

Limited prior data suggest an association between traffic-related air pollution and incident asthma in adults. No published studies assess the effect of long-term exposures to particulate matter less than 2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5) on adult incident asthma.

OBJECTIVES

To estimate the association between ambient air pollution exposures (PM2.5 and nitrogen dioxide, NO2) and development of asthma and incident respiratory symptoms.

METHODS

The Sister Study is a U.S. cohort study of risk factors for breast cancer and other health outcomes (n = 50,884) in sisters of women with breast cancer (enrollment, 2003-2009). Annual average (2006) ambient PM2.5 and NO2 concentrations were estimated at participants' addresses, using a national land-use/kriging model incorporating roadway information. Outcomes at follow-up (2008-2012) included incident self-reported wheeze, chronic cough, and doctor-diagnosed asthma in women without baseline symptoms.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS

Adjusted analyses included 254 incident cases of asthma, 1,023 of wheeze, and 1,559 of chronic cough. For an interquartile range (IQR) difference (3.6 μg/m(3)) in estimated PM2.5 exposure, the adjusted odds ratio (aOR) was 1.20 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.99-1.46, P = 0.063) for incident asthma and 1.14 (95% CI = 1.04-1.26, P = 0.008) for incident wheeze. For NO2, there was evidence for an association with incident wheeze (aOR = 1.08, 95% CI = 1.00-1.17, P = 0.048 per IQR of 5.8 ppb). Neither pollutant was significantly associated with incident cough (PM2.5: aOR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.88-1.03, P = 0.194; NO2: aOR = 1.00, 95% CI = 0.93-1.07, P = 0.939).

CONCLUSIONS

Results suggest that PM2.5 exposure increases the risk of developing asthma and that PM2.5 and NO2 increase the risk of developing wheeze, the cardinal symptom of asthma, in adult women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1 Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25172226

Citation

Young, Michael T., et al. "Ambient Air Pollution Exposure and Incident Adult Asthma in a Nationwide Cohort of U.S. Women." American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, vol. 190, no. 8, 2014, pp. 914-21.
Young MT, Sandler DP, DeRoo LA, et al. Ambient air pollution exposure and incident adult asthma in a nationwide cohort of U.S. women. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2014;190(8):914-21.
Young, M. T., Sandler, D. P., DeRoo, L. A., Vedal, S., Kaufman, J. D., & London, S. J. (2014). Ambient air pollution exposure and incident adult asthma in a nationwide cohort of U.S. women. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 190(8), 914-21. https://doi.org/10.1164/rccm.201403-0525OC
Young MT, et al. Ambient Air Pollution Exposure and Incident Adult Asthma in a Nationwide Cohort of U.S. Women. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2014 Oct 15;190(8):914-21. PubMed PMID: 25172226.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ambient air pollution exposure and incident adult asthma in a nationwide cohort of U.S. women. AU - Young,Michael T, AU - Sandler,Dale P, AU - DeRoo,Lisa A, AU - Vedal,Sverre, AU - Kaufman,Joel D, AU - London,Stephanie J, PY - 2014/8/31/entrez PY - 2014/8/31/pubmed PY - 2014/12/17/medline KW - NO2 KW - PM2.5 KW - asthma incidence KW - nitrogen dioxide KW - particulate matter SP - 914 EP - 21 JF - American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine JO - Am J Respir Crit Care Med VL - 190 IS - 8 N2 - RATIONALE: Limited prior data suggest an association between traffic-related air pollution and incident asthma in adults. No published studies assess the effect of long-term exposures to particulate matter less than 2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5) on adult incident asthma. OBJECTIVES: To estimate the association between ambient air pollution exposures (PM2.5 and nitrogen dioxide, NO2) and development of asthma and incident respiratory symptoms. METHODS: The Sister Study is a U.S. cohort study of risk factors for breast cancer and other health outcomes (n = 50,884) in sisters of women with breast cancer (enrollment, 2003-2009). Annual average (2006) ambient PM2.5 and NO2 concentrations were estimated at participants' addresses, using a national land-use/kriging model incorporating roadway information. Outcomes at follow-up (2008-2012) included incident self-reported wheeze, chronic cough, and doctor-diagnosed asthma in women without baseline symptoms. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Adjusted analyses included 254 incident cases of asthma, 1,023 of wheeze, and 1,559 of chronic cough. For an interquartile range (IQR) difference (3.6 μg/m(3)) in estimated PM2.5 exposure, the adjusted odds ratio (aOR) was 1.20 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.99-1.46, P = 0.063) for incident asthma and 1.14 (95% CI = 1.04-1.26, P = 0.008) for incident wheeze. For NO2, there was evidence for an association with incident wheeze (aOR = 1.08, 95% CI = 1.00-1.17, P = 0.048 per IQR of 5.8 ppb). Neither pollutant was significantly associated with incident cough (PM2.5: aOR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.88-1.03, P = 0.194; NO2: aOR = 1.00, 95% CI = 0.93-1.07, P = 0.939). CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that PM2.5 exposure increases the risk of developing asthma and that PM2.5 and NO2 increase the risk of developing wheeze, the cardinal symptom of asthma, in adult women. SN - 1535-4970 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25172226/Ambient_air_pollution_exposure_and_incident_adult_asthma_in_a_nationwide_cohort_of_U_S__women_ L2 - https://www.atsjournals.org/doi/10.1164/rccm.201403-0525OC?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -